Your new app icons and the misaligned text on them

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 2 weeks ago
I just have a single question... who, at Adobe, let this happen?

Let’s ignore the legibility and differentiation issues everyone has now with your new icons, who let THIS happen?



I remember a whole thing about the team having “A new design system at Adobe!” and then...none of the text icons are aligned? And this is not just about “overshooting” in typography, no, this is the fact that when you draw thin guides, nothing is aligned.

My red line here is too thick for you to see, but if you blow the icons up, you’ll see it too clearly. And I noticed this from a far when I updated my icons, Lightroom is just straight up in the air.

This may be a small thing, but this IS the canary in the coal mine, and with no more careful quality control, where could your “Design system” go...

And ps. just because you can do flat design, everything goes to a certain extent:)

Photo of Konstantin

Konstantin

  • 28 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like

Posted 2 weeks ago

  • 1
Photo of Dave Grainger

Dave Grainger

  • 404 Posts
  • 72 Reply Likes
Are you trying to use Lightroom on an iPhone???
Photo of Konstantin

Konstantin

  • 28 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
That’s a 12.9” iPad Pro
Photo of Nicolas Picard

Nicolas Picard

  • 29 Posts
  • 10 Reply Likes
This is sick! I've been looking for the favicon of Adobe Stock during 5 minutes in my favbar.... What's wrong with you guys....??????
Photo of Joel Weisbrod

Joel Weisbrod

  • 204 Posts
  • 128 Reply Likes
Really! Who cares about this? I just want the software to do what it is supposed to do. I do not have time to draw lines and measure the Adobe icons. Very silly to post this!
Photo of Konstantin

Konstantin

  • 26 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
WHO CARES ABOUT THIS? A company that introduced a new DESIGN SYSTEM and months later ruined the design of all icons. Every designer cares about even the smallest detail. I do not even know why you’re using Adobe software in the first place.
Photo of Keith Anderson

Keith Anderson

  • 57 Posts
  • 22 Reply Likes

Sorry to be disagreeable but I disagree with Joel Weisbrod. 

It is a bit like the joke about air travel.  It is a bit hard to trust that the plane has been well maintained if the tray table falls down spontaneously. 

I'm a bit thingy about alignment and Photoshop has tools to align things.  I'm also thingy about good and bad software design.  Good design would have an Icon drawing procedure with appropriate parameters.  If that procedure has a flaw, every icon will have a flaw; when it has no flaws, no icon will be flawed.  Evidently Photoshop isn't designed like that and each icon is its own entity.  This maximises effort and minimises reliability.  If this design philosophy pervades the whole program, it is little wonder that it is a haven for bugs. 

Photo of Konstantin

Konstantin

  • 27 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Exactly! This is what I meant by “ this IS the canary in the coal mine ”.
Photo of Johan Elzenga

Johan Elzenga, Champion

  • 2896 Posts
  • 1246 Reply Likes
Fortunately, the people who design icons are not involved in coding the applications.
Photo of Dave Grainger

Dave Grainger

  • 389 Posts
  • 67 Reply Likes
Canary? No. This thread is more reminiscent of the time I saw a tourist stop to look at a magnificent orange grove who then complained that the irrigation ditches were not straight.
Photo of Konstantin

Konstantin

  • 27 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
I’m sorry Dave, but there is nothing magnificent about the new icons.
Photo of Dave Grainger

Dave Grainger

  • 389 Posts
  • 67 Reply Likes
My analogy was that Photoshop = the orange grove and that the tourist = disgruntled users who focus on a tiny bit of little consequence.
Photo of Keith Anderson

Keith Anderson

  • 57 Posts
  • 22 Reply Likes

It depends a bit on what product Adobe wants Photoshop to be.  Konstantin and I think Adobe like to think it is a world leading product.  I think they like to think they are the experts and provide the examples of how things should be done when they are done right.  Maybe we are wrong.  Maybe Adobe is repositioning Photoshop to become their bargain basement product and want us to use something more expensive, not necessarily something Adobe sells. 


I think the comment by Johan provides a clue.  If the people who design icons are doing what I think they do, then they are working harder, not smarter, and the result is wonky icons.  Maybe they are working harder because the programmers haven't provided the tools to allow them to work smarter. 


I think we have not just one canary, but a whole cage of them, warning us that Adobe needs to look into this more deeply to discover why a world leading product is losing its way.  We aren't complaining about a few bends in an irrigation ditch, we're complaining that things that should be aligned aren't.  Imagine how well Word would sell if text didn't align properly on the baseline.  Imagine how popular baseball would be if the diamond had a kink in the line from second base to third base, making it a pentagon. 


Photo of Konstantin

Konstantin

  • 28 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Amazing comment, Keith. 
Couldn’t agree more.

I Love Adobe. As a user who started using Photoshop when I was 7, and mastered most of the tools & techniques by the time I was 12, Photoshop is at the end of the day a tool I will always come back to because — it’s nostalgia. 

Even tho more affordable, and in some ways — better — tools are out there, I will always be a Photoshop user... And I just hate to see the incredible top-notch quality slowly drift away. (Take a look at the fall of stability in Premiere, the bugs of “Creative sync” and the pricing greed with the introduction of Creative Cloud).

I hope that somewhere, deep inside Adobe, there are developers who have the same deep love for what Photoshop fundamentally stands for. 

And instead of having money-hungry people like the managers and the CEO talk about the meaning of creativity — I’d like for those developers to show it to us — with great, high quality software. Because money and bureaucracy hasn’t brought anything good to the creative side of Adobe, it has just slown it down exponentially.

But who knows, maybe those Sneak-peeks from Adobe Max will one day show up in our apps, and maybe Adobe is secretly working on a ground-breaking update. But this is just how it currently seems to many users, this is feedback.
(Edited)
Photo of Dave Grainger

Dave Grainger

  • 403 Posts
  • 72 Reply Likes
Doing the math here, I deduce that you are still very young , but have achieved a lot!

re what you termed as "pricing greed with the introduction of Creative Cloud" : you apparently are not aware of the strategic corporate move that was. Apple revolutionized the way the public views how "apps" are distributed and priced. Adobe could not have survived with the old license and then re-license updates model, as Adobe would have been way out of sync with public perceptions of value. Secondly, the move was a way to smooth out and obtain predictable cash flow (in order to continue to employ people, BTW) as opposed to having unpredictable cash and then only when a client decides whether to upgrade.

That was NOT greed, it was smart management.
(Edited)
Photo of Konstantin

Konstantin

  • 28 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Well if 20 is very young, thanks ! :)

There are apps like Affinity that have 96% of the feature set of Adobe, and they are improving their apps at lightning speed. I encourage you to check DaVinci Ressolve even now it’s really light years ahead of Premiere.

They somehow survive without the subscription? Imagine how good would Adobe do because they have such a huge reputation... No, they won’t do $11 billion good, but certainly good enough to have a constant need to make their apps better. Certainly good enough to not go bankrupt, if these little guys didn’t. But they will be driven to innovate more, that’s for sure.

And I think that the current “perception of value” is way out of touch with the consumer. $60/month? I think all consumers are smart enough to know that they would be cheaper off if they bought the $399 app in the long run.

Again, some people are in it for more and more money, other ones are for the pure love of doing it. That’s what I meant by “money didn’t bring anything good to the creative side of Adobe”, because creativity, contradictory to popular belief, is never accelerated by money