X-t2 (Fujifil) raw files (raf extension) not readable by CS6 (desktop version, not cloud)

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  • Updated 2 years ago
I am upset - As a photographer I do all of my edits in the creative suite. A couple of years ago that was a huge investment. I recently switched from Canon to Fuji (x t1) and had serious problems opening their raf-raw files with CS6. That was rectified with a Camera Raw update. Now I have bought the X t2 and the same thing is happening.
Why??
When is an update coming that does not force me to download Photoshop in the Cloud? I work on lots of photographs and need that update so that the X t2's raf files can be read bij camera raw. Are there any solutions you have to offer?
I downloaded all recent updates. 7.9 for raw however does not work with my CS6 (13.0.6). Update 9.1.1. also does not do the trick.
I urgently need to work on the results of a shoot I did yesterday - any ideas?
For lack of other options I have downloaded the trial for CC and it works there, it is just that I am forced to do all edits one by one and not as I usually do in batched. That is a pain in the behind and will take me all day, but at least I can revert to JPGs.
If the updates are not coming soon can you tell me if I can use CC and do it on a monthly basis? As soon as the CS6 update comes out, I want to leave the cloud. I do not want to be forced to use it!
I hope to hear back soon.
If you have a phone # I am happy to give you a call so we can discuss. My own # is 1-905-466-3907
Please HELP!
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Nicky

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Posted 2 years ago

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Chris Castleberry, Camera Raw Engineer

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Hi Nicky, 

Download/install the free DNG Converter (link below), convert your RAF files to DNG and you can open them in ACR 9.1.1.

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/digital-negative.html

Regards,

- Chris
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Nicky

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Hi Chris,
The previous time I did that through Lightroom I had huge loss of quality. Is there a risk of that happening again? Do you expect an update for Raw in the foreseeable future?

Thanks,
Nicky
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Nicky

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I appreciate your attention to this issue. I have the same settings as you indicate in your message. Can you send me a private email address to send the two files to? I usually use WeTransfer if that is OK?
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Chris Castleberry, Camera Raw Engineer

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WeTranser is fine.

My email is ccastleb@adobe.com

Enjoy your weekend,

- Chris
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Gerd Grimm

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Hi there, I am going to buy a x-t2 within the next 3 months. How did the comparison between fuji compressed files and dng compressed files turn out? How large are fuji compressed files? Thank you in advance. I am running lightroom 6.6
Gerd
(Edited)
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Vaughn Sills

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I just purchased an XT2 (two months ago) and can't look at the raw files in Photoshop CS6. I see the problem described in previous emails, and am quite concerned -- I do not use Light room (don't want to, thanks, I'm happy with Photoshop) And I don't want to pay a monthly fee. 

Is there a solution? 
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Nicky

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Hey Gerd and Vaughn,

There is a solution without having to buy into Photoshop Cloud. There is a Adobe DNG converter available on the Adobe site. Just google it and you can download for free. It works well and I did many comparisons and there is no loss in quality of the raw files. Just make sure to adhere to what Chris said about the settings in the earlier posting.

Gerd, I am not sure about lightroom. I do not use it because it just has a bare minimum of Photoshop functionalities. If I have JPG shots that need editing, I prefer to have the full toolset of Photoshop at my disposal.

RAF files from the XT-2 are around 50mb and the DNGs are 2/3rds of that. So between 30 and 35mb. Depending on the lens you use and the detail of the shot, the original JPGs from the camera are between 10 and 25mb.

This is my current workflow, that works best for me:

1. Create two folders on a secure archive location (remote disk or second hard drive in your computer. One is for the RAF files, the other is for the converted DNGs

2. Within those two folders, create 12 subfolders - one for each month. If you adhere to the syntax 01_jan, 02_feb etc. you can easily sort them.

3. Dump your new RAF files from the card into the parent folder of the RAF folder

4. Open Adobe DNG converter and point to the parent folder of the RAF

5. Choose the relevant calendar subfolder in the DNG parent folder as the destination, so that the DNGs are created in the right place right away

6. After you are done, move the RAF files in their own relevant calendar subfolder

Takes some time to set up, but once it is in place it works well (for me).
I create these separate folder-duos for each year.

I do this so that I have a minimum of changes to make each time I choose to use the converter. The source folder will stay the same the next time you open it until you change to a new year. The destination folder only has to be changed when you proceed into the next month of the current year.

After the convert, you can now open the DNGs in the camera RAW editor that comes with Photoshop.

I have a same type of archive for resulting JPGs. They are basically just work files. I use them to show and share the images and I have them on my main disk AND in a separate archive location.

Now, here is another suggestion.

I currently photograph in RAF and in JPG. We have 2 memory cards in the new FUJI, so space is not an issue. This means I always have two versions of the images I make. I initially use the JPGs on computer to select which shots are worth keeping. If you play with all the different JPG options (type of colour, sharpness, contrast) you will eventually find the settings that you are happy with. Those JPGs, especially if they are more a snapshot than a piece of art, are often good enough for sharing.

You will find that you have to get to know the camera by taking lots of shots in different conditions, using different settings. Sharpness and contrast are something that require a one-off change. But then you need to experiment with the use of the different colour profiles. If you think you are never going to work with JPGs straight from the camera than disregards these remarks, as they are applied only to the JPGs on camera. You can see this clearly when you compare a converted RAF with the JPG from the camera. The DNG image will not have the typical FUJI hues and offer a neutral point to start your edits.

These days I only convert the RAFs to DNG when the shot is really good and/or I don't like what the JPG engine in the camera give me. I find that the camera is a wonderful travel companion, I don't leave the house often without taking it. Because of that you will probably have a lot of snapshots. It is quick and easy to copy them to your computer and share those.

It is when you start doing more artsy and/or complicated stuff that you really do need the raw images. For instance, the FUJI performs well in low light situations. Even though it gives me a totally different result from my Canon shots, one thing is clear: there is incredibly little noise in the darker parts of a long exposure shot. And even if you go to a higher ISO, the noise is still impressively low. So, once you find that out, you can do a lot of nice experiments and it will give you unique results; unique to FUJI.

Anyway.... I hope this helps!


Have fun and keep shooting!
Nicky