Lightroom: Wrong star rating assigned to exported jpeg files

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  • Updated 2 years ago
  • (Edited)
When I export to jpeg, sometimes the star rating in the jpeg metadata does not match that in Lightroom v6.5.1.  Here is some information that may be relevant in debugging:

- source files are raw (NEF) files from a Nikon D7000
- I think, but am unsure, that this error occurs only when the star rating have been changed from a previously assigned value
- The file history never shows changes in star ratings
- The 3 cases I explored in detail all had "synchronize settings" in their history as well as subsequent adjustments to settings.
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Scott

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Posted 2 years ago

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Sunil Bhaskaran, Official Rep

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Tom,
Are you able to reproduce this issue on the files you tested?

Thanks,
Sunil
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Scott

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Sunil,
Yes, I am able to reproduce the issue.
--Scott
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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Select one of the raw files that has the problem and do Metadata > Save Metadata To File. Then upload the raw file and its .xmp sidecar file to Dropbox (or similar) and post the link here.  We'll see if we can reproduce the problem and perhaps suggest a workaround.
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Scott

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John,

In reviewing the metadata in the sidecar file, I noticed a few additional lines in the files that had erroneous jpeg star ratings when exported:
xmlns:MicrosoftPhoto="http://ns.microsoft.com/photo/1.0/"
MicrosoftPhoto:Rating="50" (or "75" or "3")
xmp:CreatorTool="ViewNX 2.10 W"

The files also had the same line other files had:
xmp:Rating="2" (or whatever rating)

This seems a likely candidate, although Lightroom should probably use the xmp:rating field rather than others.

I don't recall editing any of these in Nikon's View NX2 software. I may have viewed some files in Microsoft Photo (comes with Windows 10). I'm pretty confident I did not assign star ratings to photos in either application.

I welcome any insights you have, and can put files on dropzone if that is deemed helpful.

Thanks,
Scott
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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LR only adds or modifies the XMP:Rating field.  Those other fields were added by ViewNX and Microsoft Photo at some point.  In accordance with the standard, LR will preserve any XMP fields it doesn't modify.
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Scott

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I now recall that, prior to purchasing LR, I reviewed all of the photos in Nikon's free View NX2 software and assigned some star ratings. It was months later when I got LR and did all the post processing. I still have not figured out how Microsoft Photo ratings got in the metadata. At any rate, the source of the issue has been identified. I agree that LR should preserve metadata it does not modify, but it still to me that it should use the star rating metadata that it wrote into the file, rather than metadata from other applications, when exporting. Would an Adobe employee please reply acknowledging creating of a change request, or if not, with a rationale for not doing so.

It would also be nice if LR, only when opening a file without the xmp:Rating, looked in other rating metatdata fields and then wrote that star rating in the xmp:Rating field. Maybe LR already does that.
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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"it should use the star rating metadata that it wrote into the file, rather than metadata from other applications, when exporting."

I think there may be something else going on. If you upload one of the problem photos and its .xmp sidecar to Dropbox or similar, I can put them under the microscope to see what's going on.
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Scott

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Here is the xmp file:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/79yk0vk1b91...
I tried 4 times to upload the NEF file, but it failed every time. I'll try again another day.
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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That .xmp looks vanilla enough.  However, it's important to get the corresponding .nef as well.  There are circumstances in which LR follows the standard and ignores fields in the .xmp field in favor of corresponding fields in the raw.
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Scott

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I have not yet figured out how to get the NEF to successfully load to dropbox. I'll keep trying.
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Scott

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I can load smaller jpeg files on Dropbox, but the ~15 MB nef files will not load.  Do you have an e-mail to which I can send a 15 MB file?
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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A 15 MB file will be too large for my mail service, unfortunately.  What happens when you try to upload to Dropbox?
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Scott

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At first it says it will take 1 minute to load, then that increases,and the progress bar decreases.  Eventually it fails with an error message to check my connection. When I try the basic uploader, it just never loads.  I've waited hours.
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Try www.wetransfer.com - you can send it to yourself and post the download link or send it straight to John.
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Scott

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Cool.  Thanks for the tip, Victoria.  Here is the link to the NEF:
https://we.tl/fVN24cC7O2
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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I think you're observing confusion from the fact that there are two different rating fields in the .nef and .xmp, one standard (written by LR) and one non-standard (written by Microsoft software).    Windows File Explorer will show you the non-standard field, whereas LR is (correctly) manipulating the standard field.  Most commercial photo software and Web serviers will ignore the non-standard field.

Thus, my advice is to ignore what Windows File Explorer or other Windows programs say about the rating.

Details

The .nef contains these fields:

[XMP]           Rating Percent                  : 1
[XMP]           Rating                          : 1

The former is the non-standard Microsoft field, the latter is the industry-standard field.

The .xmp contains these fields:

[XMP]           Rating Percent                  : 1
[XMP]           Rating                          : 2

When I import the .nef into my LR CC 2015.6, LR correctly reads the industry-standard rating from the second field of the .xmp and displays 2 stars in the Metadata panel.  When LR exports a JPEG, the exported JPEG also contains:

[XMP]           Rating Percent                  : 1
[XMP]           Rating                          : 2

LR copied the non-standard RatingPercent field as per the XMP standard -- programs should preserve all XMP metadata fields that they don't change.

Programs that conform with the industry standards read the XMP:Rating field from the JPEG and ignore the Microsoft-specific XMP:RatingPercent.  Nearly all photo programs will behave that way.

Microsoft software however doesn't confirm with this part of the standard, however, and it will read XMP:RatingPercent.   That's why Windows File Explorer shows the JPEG with 1 star, while LR and other photo software show it with 2 stars.  
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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By the way, Microsoft initiated the latest relevant industry standard, the Metadata Working Group, which was also supported by Apple, Adobe, Canon, Nokia, and Sony.   I have no idea why Microsoft Windows 10 doesn't conform with the standards.
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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Also, you could use the free Exiftool to remove XMP:RatingPercent from all of your files.  Once you do that, Windows File Explorer will read the industry standard XMP:Rating.  (But don't modify the rating with Windows File Explorer -- it will write XMP:RatingPercent.)
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Scott

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Thanks for the insight; Microsoft does not conform to the industry standard.  Probably it should not be a surprise, but it is still a bummer.