WHY is it so hard to find/figure out

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Im new to the whole photo/edit world. I have found that I love it, but once I get into Photoshop CC and Lightroom on the desktop I'm SOOOOOOOOOOOO friggin overwhelmed. I've watched the video that comes with it but really have you watched and looked at it as if you have NEVER seen or used the software in your life? I'm not sure if you make those for noobies or not ... maybe you can add a section beginners, advanced, and NOOBIE.  I'm so lost once I open either one those programs I just spend 5 mins before I have 10 things open that I have NO idea what they do or why they got opened the fist place. I have more success with the phone apps and I'm paying for the desktop 10 bucks a month and for an unemployed single father, that's a lot. I gave up Netflix and Hulu and trust me  I went through hell from my teenaged daughter!!!!! I hope that someone reads this and make a change in the software to make or merge the simplicity of the phone app to the software and maybe as you grow you can unlock some of the more advanced things but as of now you open and there are 10,000.000 tools and key commands. well, im about to go a cook for my baby girl how asks me why we don't have Netflix and why I'm not using the computer to edit ???  
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Jean Seldon

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  • overwhelmed

Posted 1 year ago

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John Maguire

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My thoughts for you would be to go to youtube and find a video that explains what layers are and how they're used as that is the main advantage of photoshop. Once you get that figured out move on to masks and go from there
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Beverly Parks

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In my opinion, Lightroom is way easier to learn and use than Photoshop.  Unless you need to use layers and masks or do photo composites, I'd suggest concentrating on learning Lightroom first before moving on to Photoshop.

I'm still learning Photoshop myself, but a tip I might provide for Photoshop is to know what you want to do (such as combine or blend two photos into one) and search YouTube for tutorials on THAT procedure.  Don't try to tackle everything at once with Photoshop, you'll go crazy.
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Steve Gandy

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This is good advice! Check out the Lightroom Queen's ebooks. She has a free quick start guide and a full manual (that has the newbie track). 
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Owen Moore

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There's a group of books called the WOW books.
Look for Photoshop Wow and follow the directions carefully. You will be thrilled.
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Cristen Gillespie

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As one of the authors of the last of the Photoshop WOW books, I'm very pleased to hear you enjoyed them and thank you for the praise, but they are no longer being produced. The information in them is still relevant, but they don't cover newer features.
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Johnny Seldon

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One of the more resent Photoshop job..... soooo hard lol took all of four of app time and 5 min of Photoshop on the desktop.
(Edited)
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Carl Douthit

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These programs, along with the so-called "help" files, seem to be infested with circular reasoning: If you already know how to use them, the explanations of how to use them will make sense.

But if you don't already know how to use them, then there are so many unfamiliar terms used in the explanations that it is nearly impossible to figure out how to use them from the explanations.

A couple of days ago a friend helped me out with something that I had spent hours on trying to figure out -- he gave me simple directions on how to make something work without using the special definitions to words that Adobe seems to like. It wasn't that hard to do. I can't help but wonder if Adobe takes pride at having a program that is extremely noobie unfriendly as some type of bragging rights.

Thirty-plus years ago, I used a database program that was labeled, in published reviews, as "User Vicious". Hmmmm
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Beverly Parks

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Carl, are you related to Mick Douthit? 
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Carl Douthit

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No, I don't know who Mick Douthit is.
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Beverly Parks

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OK, thanks.  He's a friend of mine and it's not a common name, so I thought you might be related.

Have a good night!
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Bruce Williams

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Hi Jean,

Can I suggest your try the 10 day trial on KelbyOne?  These folks have many different training videos, all related to the Adobe suite and to photography/videography.  I've used them for years, and find it VERY helpful.  Like you, I'm on a budget, but I think the value of KelbyOne is tremendous.  Good luck my friend!
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Johnny Seldon

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Thank you... Please its Johhny, and anymorebinfo You can give its needed lol
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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If you're already on a tight-budget there are plenty of "free" tutorials and help available right on Adobe.com. You'll find both beginners and advanced level assistance here:

https://helpx.adobe.com/support/lightroom.html

https://helpx.adobe.com/support/photoshop.html

https://helpx.adobe.com/creative-cloud/tutorials-photography-jumpstart.html

I suggest focusing on learning Lightroom and only moving to the Photoshop tutorials once you feel comfortable using Lightroom. The Lightroom Queen's eBooks are also a great way to learn and the Lightroom Quick Start guide is free:

https://www.lightroomqueen.com/

If you get "stuck" at any point during the learning process the best place to get a quick answer is in the Adobe Lightroom forum. Use the online help resources and the 'Find Answers' search tool here:

https://forums.adobe.com/community/lightroom

...and remember Lightroom Rule #5: Enjoy! 
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Daniel Presedo, Employee

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I began thinking about this about a year ago on my YouTube channel. It's definitely something that is on my radar:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0Uu4N67GZGxje6zHkyPnbuvInOF6uAGT

If it's something you would find useful let me know.
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Carl Douthit

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I'm glad that it is on someone's radar. The third-party (paid and free) resources are usually helpful, depending on the knowledge and quality.

But I consider it an admission of its failure on Adobe's part that something as essential as how to get started on Photoshop and in what order learn things is left to third-party resources.

Yes, I understand that it is a program with lots of depth and complexity and I've found the tutorials to be very helpful. But my frustration is that when I get to a tutorial through the Help dialog, they sometimes are often in the middle of a series of tutorials. So there are references to "based on what you already know", which presumes that I've worked through the previous tutorials -- and I have no idea what those are, where they are found, and in what order I should learn things.

I would find it very helpful if Photoshop beginners had the following resources (if they already exist, then please make finding them MUCH easier):

1. A list which gives a basic order of skills and resources to learn. This might start with something like how to open and close a file, how to decide which format to save a photo in, etc.

2. A basic glossary with simple-language definitions. For example, it might include "Masks: Masks hide ______________".

3. A list order of tutorials and the skills/resources. That way, if I need to know about something I can also see what prerequisite skills are already assumed by that tutorial and can make sure that I know them.

and so on.
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Cristen Gillespie

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Wow that's a big ask. I use the Help files all the time to write about features or create questions and and answers, and I'd be happy if they simply got the whole app indexed. That is time-consuming, but fairly straightforward.

What you're asking for is 1) someone to determine the workflow every user needs (kind of unknown there); 2) someone to make that index for the online Help, PDF manual, and Search function inside PS, that they appear not to have the manpower to do; 3) someone (or more likely a committee of someone's) to evaluate all the tutorials they offer, and ranking them beyond what they already do (Beginner/Experienced), including a description of the set of skills you need before you view the tutorial? (Frankly, considering where they started with this a few years ago, I'm rather impressed by how much better the Learn section has gotten.)

They could perhaps start beginners off with the workspace. It doesn't seem to be first on their list of beginner tutorials in Learn and Support. But they've done a pretty good job of dividing up tutorials according to experience (even though that's rather more broad than granular), and type of interest that brings you to PS —photography, design, etc.

I'm not trying to be snarky here. I appreciate why you want all this, and in an ideal world, Adobe could provide it— but I think that puts Adobe squarely in the education business, producing courses, rather than mere "help" files and videos, something that is considerably more involved. Designing a course is not the same thing as providing snippets of videos and some pages of help for features.

Possibly the online Help could have a little more assistance by providing a list of links just for beginners, but after acquainting them with the workspace, how is Adobe to know what you want to learn next?

Those manuals, btw, were among the best in the business, and they also produced Classroom in a Book tutorials—btw, if they still publish those through Pearson/Peachpit, those are helpful for beginners and provide a walk-through of essential features.  It's as close to Adobe satisfying 1 on your list as it gets.

Apart from that, Adobe has always relied upon 3rd party folk, and many still are in the business of education. There are terrific video courses out there, and there are still some excellent books. But it's not free. It wouldn't be "free" to Adobe to hire the people to do what you want, so how are they to justify those resources? At some point, somewhere, we pay for our education. Most community colleges these days seem to offer courses for very little, as well.

There are plenty of resources for Photoshop. Too many, it sometimes seems, but unless you want it all for free, setting a budget and asking around can help direct the learning process without needing Adobe to do more than provide a thoroughly good Manual, online and PDF, which they've still to do, but they're inching towards it.
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Cristen Gillespie

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A series of beginner tutorials on YouTube that have an order to them would always be welcome. The main trouble with learning from YouTube and other self-contained tutorials is the brand new user has no direction on what to learn first, what's next, and so one. There used to be plenty of books that started at the beginning and went on to the end, but the bigger Photoshop got and the more the internet supplanted book sales, the more difficult it became to produce such books. I find that if you have considerable  self-discipline, even a one month subscription to lynda.com and taking Deke's essential course in Photoshop is a great start, appropriately geared to brand new users, but it can get expensive if you don't push yourself through in that month.
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Johnny Seldon

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Thank you all so much.... Please note the all my shots are from a #Note5 and I've been a Chef for 24+ years. So here a excressise for me .... I'm going post and before and then the after all I ask is look at it and tell me if the edits where close or im way off in left Feild.