Why call it 'Classic' ?

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Why confuse things by calling what used to be Lightroom CC 'Classic' and calling the new version by the 'old' name? Why not Lightroom Mobile & Lightroom or Lightroom Pro. Calling it 'Classic' suggests it's an old version you no longer want to support.

Can't say I have much interest if any in the 'new' Lightroom CC and I'm not sure who it's really aimed at other than mobile phone snappers who are unlikely to need such sophistication or want to pay for it?
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Les Cornwell

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Posted 9 months ago

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Rick Spaulding, Champion

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Julieanne Kost says it better than I ever could. Give this video a look and it may help explain things:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDhzGtwNCGg&feature=youtu.be

Cheers!
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Les Cornwell

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Thanks Rick, I've already seen the video. Call me a cynic but I'm still not convinced that Adobe will support LR 'Classic' for the long term...
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Simon Chen, Principal Computer Scientist

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Paul Parkinson

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+1 from me on the use of Classic - it smacks of end of life, TBH. If they are trying to differentiate the two products, why not make it Lightroom Pro or Lightroom Desktop for the old LR CC, and something zingy for the new version. 

I've had a look at the new CC and I will use it on my day job PC with shared collections from my main machines. There is no need to use the web for my work in this way. I'm double backed up (2 x Drobo plus online via OpenDrive) so I won't be using Adobe's service. 

I think it would be very useful, very comforting, to get a statement from Adobe about their long term plans for Lightroom. 

If "Classic" is just an expectation setting exercise as they move everything to be web focused, I won't be happy.
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Simon Chen, Principal Computer Scientist

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It is not about EOL. It is about serving the needs of all customer segments https://feedback.photoshop.com/photoshop_family/topics/why-two-ligtrooms-adobe .
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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"It is not about [end-of-life]".  

That may well be Adobe's intention, but it's becoming clear that many people (myself included) think that the name "Classic" connotes end-of-life, reduced priorities, etc.  If indeed many customers and potential customers perceive that connotation, changing that perception is an uphill marketing battle that most marketers would simply have avoided in the first place by choosing some other naming.   It's unfortunate that this new name was introduced on the same day that perpetual licenses were ended -- not a great way to build trust with the existing users who are most likely to continue using Classic.  (I'm a longtime user of CC and very satisfied with the subscription model.)
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Gary Rowe

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Absolutely spot on
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Ronald Byram

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why Not Lightroom (desktop) and Lightroom CC or Cloud?
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Paul Parkinson

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It may not be about end of life but the naming is clumsy at best. Classic does denote "something old, venerated but old". To give the Desktop product this name whilst at the same time introducing something with the old products name indicates a REPLACEMENT not an ADDITIONAL product. 

I think the Adobe marketing team need to get their skates on here.
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Brian Zwit

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Reminds me of Classic Coke and New Coke and we all know how that turned out.
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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Actually quite good. Classic is the one that survived...
(Edited)
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Brian Zwit

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My point exactly.
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Paul Parkinson

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Yes, New Coke vs Classic Coke but in the end, they dropped Classic and went back to Coke!
It's all in the name. Lightroom Professional is MUCH better.
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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It's incredible what a difference just one word can make. There are lots of negative comments here and in other forums, and all of those comments were totally predictable. If Lightroom Classic would have been called Lightroom Professional, most of these comments would have been positive...
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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"It's incredible what a difference just one word can make."  

Fully agree. That's why marketers sweat over naming. I think many LR users intuitively assume Adobe, as a big company with a presumably competent marketing department, would have sweated over the choice of "Classic", and they conclude that its obvious (to them) connotations of end-of-life must reflect Adobe's internal thinking over the long-term direction of LR.  

Heinlein's razor may apply here: "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity, but don't rule out malice."
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eartho

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Competent and Marketers: Two words which should never be used together.
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Paul Parkinson

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^^ I agree completely - I think Lightroom Professional is a FAR better name. Even when abbreviated -  LR Pro, LRP - it trips off the tongue far more easily!

"Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic CC" <- Nope...
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George Theodore

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I agree - Lightroom Professional would give me a sense of permanence. Classic says “old”, “traditional “ and on its way out.
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Cristen Gillespie

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> would have sweated over the choice of "Classic", and they conclude that its obvious (to them) connotations of end-of-life must reflect Adobe's internal thinking over the long-term direction of LR. >

Can't say I like the naming, either, since it seems obvious to me that keeping Lightroom CC and adding in Lightroom Cloud, or some such, would work to avoid a lot of confusion.

But for all everyone says Classic means "end of life," I can think of how it's a very positive term. We often say "it's a classic," meaning "it's a keeper it's so good, and has survived the test of time and fads, and kept its relevance to us." Think of fashion, old cars shown at Concourses, Roman architecture, books, and on and on. The new is not always desirable, or even functional,  just because it's on the bleeding edge.

So I suspect that like many who name things (a job I'd never want), they found the meaning they wanted and went with it, instead of their research turning up the fact that a lot of people would evidently see something new as a "replacement" and fear or hate the word "classic" to apply to the older model.
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Lee Jay

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Shear stupidity.

Imagine if Toyota renamed the 2018 Camry to "Corolla" and named their new small pickup "Camry". Think that would cause any confusion?
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Søren Langkilde Madsen

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The Lr CC is renamed to Lr Classic, the kind-of-new cloud is named Lr CC :-)

Why not just name the new Lr Cloud?

The Classic name sounds like:
Classic = nice name for Old = Close to end of life for this prduct.

The rationale must be:
Within a year or so everybody is using phones only, Nikon, Canon will stop selling cameras :-)
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Lr Cloud would suggest it will always stay entirely cloudy... perhaps there are plans to allow non-cloud use in future too?
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eartho

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Victoria, all that does is reinforce the idea that Adobe will be eol'ing "Classic" LR.

I'm not yet sold on the idea that they will, but this whole name-change is pure marketing stupidity. You don't change the name of an app which people have been using for a decade to align with a stripped down version of itself and not expect people to be confused and upset.
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Yes, maybe some years the line. We can't see the future, but I wrote up my thoughts here: Is Lightroom Classic end-of-life?
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Lee Jay

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Victoria - you've nailed my thoughts well.

LR Classic will be kept going for a while, but it's always been buggy, fragile and slow.  So they started over with a cloud version and stole LR's name for it.  Once it reaches approximate feature parity with "Classic", and can also do local storage instead of the cloud, they'll just kill off the old, slow, buggy code and everyone will be happy to have a fast, modern version that works better.
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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"Once it reaches approximate feature parity ... they'll just kill off the old, slow, buggy code"

...and replace it with the new, slow, buggy code. :->
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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"Classic" has a wide range of meaning, and it often means traditional, elegant, revered, etc. But in the context of software and the Web, it is very often used to connote end-of-life, superseded by a newer product, outdated, old fashioned, no longer available, legacy technology, supported but no more improvements, hard to use, not the preferred product, etc. -- as just a little time spent with Google reveals.  Why would marketers choose a name fraught with such connotations?  

Examples:

Adobe Acrobat Classic
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adobe_Acrobat  
"Updates for the Classic track are released quarterly, and do not include new features..."

Google Classic Maps
https://techforluddites.com/classy-gmap-update/
"Last year when Google killed off their Classic Maps program and replaced it with a much less user-friendly option missing a bunch of key features..."

https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-to-shut-down-classic-google-maps-will-introduce-new-lite-...
"Google to Shut Down Classic Google Maps, Will Introduce New Lite Version"

Google Classic Sites
https://www.lifewire.com/brief-guide-google-web-hosting-3473732
"Google launched Google Sites in 2008 to serve as a free web hosting solution for Google users, similar to Wordpress.com, Blogger and other free blogging platforms. The company received criticism regarding the difficulty of working with the original Sites interface and as a result, in late 2016, Google's overhauled Google Sites went live with a redesign. The web pages created under the original Sites design are designated as Classic Google Sites, while the sites created under the redesigned Google Sites are identified as New Google Sites.
 
"Both are fully functional, with Google promising to support Classic Google Sites web pages at least through 2018."

"The new redesigned interface promises to be much easier to work with. Although you can still work with the Classic site for a couple of years, and Google is promising a migration option for moving from Classic to New, if you are planning a new website with Google, it makes sense to use the redesigned New Google Sites."

Microsoft Classic ASP
https://classicasp.site/classic-asp-support/do-you-need-support-for-your-older-legacy-software-and-w...
"Legacy website support such as Classic ASP, Umbraco 4 and 6..."

Classic Mac OS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classic_Mac_OS
"The 'Classic' Mac OS[4] is a graphical user interface-based operating system developed by Apple Inc. for its Macintosh family of personal computers from 1984 until 2001"

Desktop App Converter
https://thenextweb.com/apps/2016/04/08/microsofts-releases-tool-converting-legacy-software-modern-wi...
At Build 2016, Microsoft announced the Desktop App Converter, a tool that would allow developers to convert classic Windows programs into modern Universal Windows Platform(UWP) apps. ... While the tool won’t magically make legacy apps look like modern ones...

Novagem Solutions
http://www.novagemsolutions.com/en-us/services/moveyourclassicdesktopoperationonweb.aspx
We move your classic desktop application on Web. Novagem Solutions allows companies to revalue their investments ... even if these are based on legacy desktop platform.

Windows Mobile 6
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Mobile
"It comes in three different versions: 'Windows Mobile 6 Standard'for Smartphones (phones without touchscreens), 'Windows Mobile 6 Professional' for Pocket PCs with phone functionality, and 'Windows Mobile 6 Classic' for Pocket PCs without cellular radios"

Basecamp
https://basecamp.com/help/2/guides/account/switch-classic
"When you're ready, it's easy for you to move your Classic projects into the new and improved version of Basecamp."

BlueNote Communicator Classic
http://www.bluenotesoftware.com/news/lights/
"Classic has all of its class; it is just not the 'flagship' product any more."

Dynix Classic
https://librarytechnology.org/repository/item.pl?id=12736
"...it came to be accepted as a strong alternative for public libraries that were moving away from their aging Dynix Classic systems."

Loch Ness Productions
https://www.lochnessproductions.com/legacy.html
"Legacy / Classic: Loch Ness Productions got its start in the traditional (now "classic") planetarium medium. ... But, the bits and bytes of computer technology eventually rendered the old slide projector and film equipment passé."

Prezi Classic
https://prezi.com/support/article/steps/prezi-classic/
Times change, and so does technology. That’s why Prezi is now Prezi Classic to make room for our newest software, Prezi Next. We’ve streamlined the best elements of Prezi Classic and added a host of new capabilities so you can create next-level presentations that visually pop and captivate your audience. While you can still use the same version of Prezi that revolutionized the way the world does presentations, we would like to introduce the next big thing in presenting.

Infosphere Classic Federation Server
http://www.lookupmainframesoftware.com/soft_detail/dispsoft/1764
"Categories: Legacy Application/Data Access + Databases...Access mainframe databases"

Salesforce Classic
https://automationchampion.com/2017/09/13/migrating-from-salesforce-classic-to-lightning-experience/
"The Lightning interface provides a more natural user experience than the familiar Salesforce Classic. ... Indeed, with every release, Lightning Experience is getting better and better."

Paypal Classic Site
https://www.google.com/search?biw=1280&bih=1265&q=paypal+classic+site+&oq=paypal+classic...
Anyone who has used Paypal for accepting business payments has experienced the horror of watching Paypal remove useful functionality...
(Edited)
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Tom Mickow

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I help teach a local Lr user group and last night we had our first meeting since the new product announcements.  In all the time I've been helping, I've never seen the group more confused about basic product names, terminology & licensing/subscriptions.  The entire meeting was spent tripping over ourselves about which "Lightroom" we were using/talking about.  It bordered on comical.

Hopefully it will iron itself out with time, but the branding is confusing and certainly leaves something to be desired.  It's hard to image the folks at Adobe couldn't see this coming and find a better way to convey their message/vision for the products.  Of course, if the intention is to eventually kill off "Classic", giving away the Lr CC name to the shiny new product actually makes some sense...
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Carlos Cardona

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Lightroom Desktop!
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Rob Rippengale

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Lightroom naming.

No, it's not very convenient and it doesn't help with Google and Bing (etc) web searches.

Last year I paid good money for a thick book on Lightroom. Most of the text still applies to the new "Classic" version but this book is now worthless for resale. Stores, warehouses, authors and publishers will be stuck with unsold copies. Adobe cost a lot of people real money.

I can't imagine any good reason to steal the name "Lightroom" except to trick people into thinking that all the commendations Lightroom has received over the years somehow apply to this new image-gathering database.

Again I request that Adobe revert the situation. Name the new product something unique to indicate its area of expertise and give us back our famous Lightroom. Please.

Note: This conversation was created from a reply on: Lightroom: How to search for specific program issues?.
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Steve Gandy

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How about Lr Anywhere or Lr Everywhere
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Alan Harper

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Adobe, your naming and version conventions are driving us crazy!.

There have been, it seems, hundreds of (deserved, IMO) complaints on these discussions about Adobe's renaming Lightroom CC to Lightroom Classic CC. But beyond that, why can't Adobe just come up with consistent names for their programs and versions so we can easily follow what is happening?

Today I see a notice from Melissa Rios saying that "Lightroom Classic 7.1" is available. My first thought is "What is 'Lightroom Classic'?" I know about a Lightroom Classic CC, a Lightroom CC, and the old version of Lightroom CC which was renamed LR Classic CC. Has Adobe introduced yet another version called "Lightroom Classic"?

My second question is, What version am I currently running? I go to the program in the Finder and hit Get Info, and I see that I am running "Adobe Lightroom Classic [1142117]". Again no "CC". And the version number doesn't correspond to the 7.0, 7.0.1, 7.1 series.

Next, I fire up Creative Collection, and I see that there is also an update for "Photoshop CC." Is this the program known as "Photoshop CC 2018" on my computer? Or is there a different version of Photoshop which doesn't have a year attached to it? (Oh, and Photoshop CC 2018, Photoshop CC 2017, Photoshop 2015.5, and Photoshop 2015 are known as versions 19, 18, 17, and 16 when you do a Get Info in the Finder.)

And, finally, when I click on "What's new?" for the update for Lightroom Classic CC I go to a page that tells me "We've been busy" and then describes the changes for the Oct 18, 2017 update. I'm pretty sure that this page is describing the version before today's update, but there is nothing on that page that tells us which versions of Lightroom it is referring to, but only uses the release date.

I really think that a bunch of drunk monkeys could come up with a better scheme than what Adobe is using:
  • The same name for different programs, 
  • two (in the case of Photoshop) or three (Lightroom Classic CC) systems of version numbers, 
  • using version numbers some places and release dates elsewhere, 
  • a bunch of "shortcut" names used by staff and Creative Collection that don't correspond to the names of the programs on my computer, 
  • and the web pages are not updated at the same time that new versions are released.
Grr!
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Cristen Gillespie

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<Melissa Rios saying that "Lightroom Classic 7.1" is available>

I think we're all assuming that the folks at Adobe know what their apps are called. By now, I suspect most of them are as confused as we are. LOL

As I recall, they originally delineated between versions to help prevent confusion from consumers when authors and other educators offered version-specific instruction. They decided it should be easily spotted by the consumers, and went with the year, but didn't release on the year they named it for.

I wonder why they decided this wouldn't be confusing? The year not matching release was confusing to some all by itself. No separation between versions is proving even more confusing. It's good that I open PS and it says what version it is, well, broadly speaking, but then the Creative Cloud app doesn't follow suit.<sigh>
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Rob Rippengale

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On my Win10 system, my desktop non-cloudy Lightroom title bar label says

  Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic

but the Help > About panel calls it

  Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic CC
  7.1 Release

and the title bar for that About panel is labelled simply

  Lightroom

which is what I prefer to call it.

The cloud image database should be given a new name and Lightroom should mean the desktop program as it always has. There could be a new Library module to access Cloud Storage via a new program with a unique name. Then Photoshop could also be allowed to access cloud storage via the new program rather than inventing a new Photoshop and demoting the desktop version to the realm of Classic. Inventing a new Lightroom just to access cloud storage was silly. Giving it the name of the famous Lightroom is theft. If I were Adobe, I would sue Adobe for this disruption.
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Katie Oliveras

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I was also confused by the introduction of "Lightroom Classic" and initially assumed it was a sign that it would no longer be supported. I agree with others that something like "Lightroom Professional" vs. "Lightroom Cloud" would have made more sense—and better signaled that these can, in fact, work together as part of an integrated workflow. 

That said, I acknowledge: Naming things is hard.