Lightroom Classic: Use embedded JPEG as a starting point for RAW conversion

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I wonder if it would be possible, that lightroom analyzes the embedded / sidecar JPEG and derives necessary settings from it to apply to the RAW to mimic the same look. This would be a great starting point for my processing - when I fine tune my picture style on my camera, and import the photographs to Lightroom, the original look is gone, once lightroom processes it's own previews. And a lot of times its hard for me to get at least close ot the look of the JPEG, as processed by camera.
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Jan Votava

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Posted 3 months ago

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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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The embedded JPEG was produced by the camera, so with another RAW engine. Lightroom won't be able to match that, and the new Auto Tone is probably better anyway. And why do you shoot in RAW in the first place, if all you want to do is match the camera JPEG? You could shoot in RAW + JPEG and only use the raw if there's a problem with the JPEG. Or you could just shoot in JPEG...
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Jan Votava

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Hi Johan, I am still post processing the picture, that's why I use RAW, because it gives me more flexibility without compromising the quality. But often I like the rendered JPEG as a good starting point for the desired look. That's why I think to have a feature, that does analyze your embedded / sidecar JPEG and applies whatever settings needed in lightroom to get close to the JPEG rendering. 
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Tom Mickow

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You can also get an approximation by choosing one of the "Camera ..." profiles rather than the "Adobe Standard" profile in the Camera Calibration panel.

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Todd Shaner, Champion

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In realty you should be able to achieve BETTER rendering than the in-camera JPEG using the raw file.

The beauty of shooting raw file format is that you don't have to make camera setting changes to get a specific image rendering. Do this with LR's Develop controls as post-processing to achieve a specific rendering. Set your camera to shoot raw + JPEG, use 'Reference View (SHIFT + R) to drag the JPEG next to the selected raw file, and then start by selecting the Camera Calibration> Profile that matches the JPEG. Add Vibrance, Saturation, and Tone Curve settings to get the rendering even closer. Create a Develop preset with just these settings checked and apply as needed. Create as many Develop presets as you need. After applying a preset adjust the image using the Basic panel Tone controls as normally do or simply click on 'Auto' tone.
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Jan Votava

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Hi Todd, thanks. This works, +/-. But, why this process cannot be performed automatically by lightroom by analyzing the JPEG?
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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Please read Andrew Rodney's post below. The raw file contains the in-camera proprietary settings, which are different for every camera model and make. Adobe would have to "reverse-engineer" each camera model to determine the required settings in LR to emulate ALL of those settings. This is a huge task that also probably violates camera  manufacturer's patents and copyrights. In short–It will never happen! What Adobe has done is to create Camera Profiles that closely emulate the camera manufacturer's picture styles with their "default settings." This should get you pretty close except for in-camera changes made to the picture style's color, sharpening, and tone settings.
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Andrew Rodney

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The JPEG which results from the raw (a raw is always produced if not saved) in the camera is proprietary processing. Just like Lightroom's processing is different and proprietary. You can attempt to get 'close' but an exact match isn't in the cards and if you insist on that rendering, shoot JPEG. Here's another reason however, many shoot raw: to render the image which is a major part of photography:
http://www.lumita.com/site_media/work/whitepapers/files/pscs3_rendering_image.pdf
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Harrison Clark

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I presume your in-camera "fine tuned picture style" is the one you always use. i.e., you apply it to every photo you take and want to avoid any additional editing in LR for most of your photos.  Todd's method should do that.  Apply the preset to the RAW files automatically upon importing.  Remove it later from any photos where it did not work so well.  Or make additional changes.  This should streamline your workflow and give you the look you are after (and got in-camera). 
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Jan Votava

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Hi Harrison, thanks for reply. Unfortunately, that's not exactly the case. I use multiple picture styles, sometimes I also tweak them (mainly contrast) to suit my current situation. This is to achieve the best possible rendering in-camera. Why? Because then I do not have to spend so much time in post processing in computer. So the lightroom formula is not always the same and to achieve the original look - AS A STARTING POINT - it not always easy to achieve. Someone asked why I shoot in RAW, when I want JPEG look. Reason is, I want to be still flexible in my post processing, e.g. with fine color adjustments, highlight / shadow recovery and dodging and burning and still not compromise the picture quality as much as possible. And there Lightroom is a great tool. But I wonder if it is for the engineers such a hard task to take the embedded / sidecar JPEG, analyze it and derive the necessary settings and maybe even custom camera profile from it. That would be my feature request.
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Harrison Clark

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I've never used Canon's DPP image processor, but I seem to recall some do use it as the first processing step for one reason or another.  I vaguely recall reading that it will apply your in-camera settings to your RAW image.  That would be a significant extra step but still might be the work-around you are looking for.  I only skimmed this, but there might be other benefits to going through DPP before importing in LR.  Using DPP might be feasible if there is some automation in DPP to reduce the time spent there.  http://www.eos-magazine.com/articles/dpp/index.html
(Edited)
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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"But I wonder if it is for the engineers such a hard task to take the embedded / sidecar JPEG, analyze it and derive the necessary settings and maybe even custom camera profile from it. That would be my feature request."

They already did that. Camera profiles like 'Camera Landscape' and 'Camera Neutral' are based on picture styles in the camera, so on the embedded jpeg. And the new Auto Tone in Lightroom Classic is superb to get a good starting point for your edits.