What application will let me work with CMYK files?

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I've been using Elements 6.0 for a really long time and I love it. Don't want to upgrade because I'm afraid I'll be surprised by a completely different environment that I'll have to learn all over again. However, I've taken on a client who wants me to change his company's quarter-page ad in the local Homes Magazine -in the next 8 days, and they require CMYK. What do I upgrade to that will be the least expensive, least foreign to my already honed Elements skillset, and will have CMYK? Does Elements 10 have it? Lightroom? CS5?
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eteallthetime

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Posted 7 years ago

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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Official Response
The only product that does CMYK is Photoshop CS5. If you purchase on Adobe.com and choose "Upgrade" for version, and select Elements 6.0 you will get $100 of the full price.
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Andrew Rodney

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You absolutely do NOT want to be supplying CMYK data unless you really know what you are doing, have a profile for the proper conversions. It isn’t as simple as clicking CMYK. The wrong conversion will make an awful output on press which is VERY expensive. Tell the client you want to send them RGB (I’d recommend you send them the data in ColorMatch RGB or maybe sRGB) and have the printer handle the conversion. Let them be responsible.

This too might help:http://www.ppmag.com/reviews/200703_r...
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TonyL

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My printers would like CMYK files of my photos for printing but it would seem Adobe Lightroom 3.4 is unable to do this. Do I have to reprocess the RAW images in Adobe Photoshop to end up with a CMYK file I can then send?

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Help with CMYK.
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john beardsworth

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Yes. You can record an action to do it, then save it as a droplet. The droplet can then be specified as an external editor in Lightroom - so you would just go Edit With > My CMYK Droplet.
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Sharon Weeks

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Frustrated! A printer that I use is now requesting CMYK and Elements 10 doesn't support this. It has created a problem for me. All large printing jobs with this company in the past were color perfect. Now that they require CMYK everything was awful. So FRUSTRATED!
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Do you need it often? If it's a one-off, a one month subscription for Photoshop might work for you - or even just the trial version temporarily.
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Sharon Weeks

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No, I haven't had a need for it often. Actually this is the first time. Was hoping there would be an add-on for Elements. Thank you for your response.
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john beardsworth

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If you're on a Mac, can't you use the ColorSync utility to do the conversion? Open the picture in it, choose Apply Profile / Output / CMYK.

Ask the printer for a CMYK profile to which you should convert. If they don't supply one, you're shooting in the dark.
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Andrew Rodney

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Yes, ColorSync will work without however Black Point Compensation (not a huge big deal). Also the free Little CMS is cross platform and will do CMYK conversions.
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john beardsworth

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Thanks Andrew. You know so much more than I about this area, so would you share my view about requesting a profile?
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Andrew Rodney

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I’d only request and use the profile if I knew for a fact it described the actual printing (or contract proofing) conditions**. Problem is, lots of people will simply send you a generic CMYK profile which may or may not define the print conditions. The last thing anyone wants to do is be at a press check and see a $5000 per hour cost of operation trying to fix a bad separation. Someone would have to put a gun to most people’s heads before they should undertake this kind of responsibility. I’d provide tagged RGB and depending on how savvy I suspect they are, maybe just ColorMatch RGB or sRGB and let them take the heat.

**Even with awesome contract proofs (what most call Matchprints), short of going to the press check and having customer control, who knows what will come off the press. I have dead-on perfect contract proofs from a custom profile I made from my book. The printing, done overseas without my ability to have any control over the process look butt ugly and nothing like the proofs. At least I didn’t have to pay to print it!

There is a reason many call CMYK the devils color space .

Or the old saying: God made RGB, Man made CMYK. What would you rather use?
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john beardsworth

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Thanks, that "hopefully actual" rather than generic profile was what I meant. I find when people ask the printer for an actual profile, as often as not the response is that RGB would be OK after all.