Camera RAW - Unwrap RAW to HDR for mirrored ball

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 4 years ago
  • (Edited)
Can the latest version of RAW unwrap a mirror ball and remove artifacts out of the image following by, which I believe can be done turn the RAW file into, not a pseudo HDR image, rather a true HDR image ? Some of the tools from the past that did this, which were free have gone defunct.
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes

Posted 4 years ago

  • 1
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2668 Posts
  • 343 Reply Likes
What you are talking about: "unwrap a mirror ball", "pseudo HDR", "true HDR"?
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
Pseudo HDR whereas you turn a JPEG into a HDR compared to using exposures making a true HDR.
Photo of Chris Cox

Chris Cox

  • 20280 Posts
  • 829 Reply Likes
That's not "pseudo" - that's just not HDR.
HDR is High Dynamic Range - which needs special cameras or multiple exposures.
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
That is what I meant by Pseudo when you take a JPEG and try to make it a HDR as you can do in Photoshop.
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2668 Posts
  • 343 Reply Likes
I think you mean storing LDR data (the JPG) into an HDR-capable format like a 32-bit TIF where you can't really tell that it's LDR data, anymore.

Anyway ACR 9 will combine exposures to make "true HDR" data that is stored in a floating point DNG.
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
That is what I wanted to know, except I didn't mention the use of LDR for JPEG in my question.

What is the best EV for DNG when creating HDR from DNG ?
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2668 Posts
  • 343 Reply Likes
JPGs can only contain LDR data so you didn't have to specify this.

There is no "best EV" for the original exposures. It depends on the brightness range of the scene. Generally you want an exposure that is dark enough to show detail in the brightest area (like the clouds) and another exposure that is bright enough to show detail in the darkest shadows, then one or more in between that give detail to the midtone areas.

The complication is that the more photos you take and combine the more chance there'll be some mismatch between them due to subject movement like people walking or plants blowing in the breeze or even your camera position changing slightly if you're shooting handheld.

And we're not creating HDR from DNG, we're creating HDR from raw files and the result is stored in the DNG. What makes this DNG different than normal DNGs is that the pixel values are floating point (decimal number) rather than integers (whole numbers) like normal raw files and DNGs and JPGs have.
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2668 Posts
  • 343 Reply Likes
ACR 9 can create an HDR linearized-DNG from multiple raw files at different exposures that retains the raw capabilities of absolute white-balance and camera profiles. This HDR-DNG has 16-bit floating point numbers for the RGB values at each pixel position.
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
A DNG/RAW file can contain different exposures, why do you need multiple RAW files ?
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2668 Posts
  • 343 Reply Likes
I'm not sure what you're talking about, now--multiple exposures in a raw/DNG.

ACR 9's HDR function can combine several LDR (low-dynamic-range) raw exposures into a single HDR-DNG raw image file that can have more range on the light and dark ends than any of the LDR exposures. This assumes that the scene, itself, contains a wide brightness range so either the shadows or the highlights or both would be clipped in a single LDR raw of the same scene.
Photo of Chris Cox

Chris Cox

  • 20280 Posts
  • 830 Reply Likes
A single DNG/RAW file can only contain a single exposure, until you convert multiple exposures into an HDR image.
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
What I mean is; what Exposure range do you recommend for DNG ?
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
I didn't know a DNG only contains single exposure. You have to take a picture of the source multiple times and adjust ... ?
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2668 Posts
  • 343 Reply Likes
Are you asking what HDR is?
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2668 Posts
  • 343 Reply Likes
You might want to review this Adobe tutorial about creating HDRs in ACR 9:
http://blogs.adobe.com/jkost/2015/04/...
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
What setting bracket settings to use when you want to create a HDR from DNG ?
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2668 Posts
  • 343 Reply Likes
It depends on the scene, what the bright-to-dark range is. You'll just have to experiment to figure this out.
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
How many images do you personally take ?
Photo of Chris Cox

Chris Cox

  • 20280 Posts
  • 830 Reply Likes
It depends on the scene. Sometimes 3 (with a 1-2 stop difference) is good enough, and sometimes you need 25 to cover the entire range.
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
I found my camera can merge the exposures automatically then output to RAW, although that depends whether I use the standard program or another program.
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2668 Posts
  • 343 Reply Likes
Multiple-exposures is different than HDR exposures. My 7D Mark II will do both, and outputs a raw in multi-exposure mode but a JPG in HDR mode.
Photo of Christopher Rotter

Christopher Rotter

  • 185 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
Some camera / smart phones are limited to JPEG in HDR, all depends on the make and model.