This whole 'let the cloud always keep you up to date' thing is starting to sound like a bogus marketing gimmick and a broken promise

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I recently took the plunge and subscribed to Adobe CC. It's more than I've ever spent on software, but one of the things that convinced me was the much vaunted promise that the Creative Cloud and seamless updating will put an end to the disruptions caused by updating things the old fashioned way.

So it has really annoyed me that, barely a few months in, this seamlessness has already been broken. Today when I launched Photoshop, it asked me if I want to migrate my settings from Photoshop CC. Seriously? You're upgrading me from Photoshop CC to....Photoshop CC, and you need to ask me whether or not I want to throw all my previous settings down the toilet? What do you think?!

Anyway, the silliness of that popup aside, it would have been all fine. But it turns out that after pressing "yes", Photoshop didn't actually manage to transfer my settings properly. My panel locations are ok (after manually selecting my workspace again), and my keyboard shortcuts seem fine too.

But many of the settings I spent hours perfecting to my particular workflow have been reset to defaults, such as my general preferences, tool options, and panel options.

For example, suddenly, my rulers are in cm instead of pixels, the ugly pixel grid is back, the direct selection tool only selects active layers, popups appear asking questions I've already told Photoshop not to bother me with, my layers and channels palettes look different to how I set them, flick panning is back, my scratch disks are no longer set to my fast SSDs, etc. etc.

Sure, these are all small things, but when you add them all up, they amount to a large succession of interruptions to my workflow. Every time something works differently to how I expect it to, I have to stop what I'm doing, figure out what's wrong, and figure out where to change the setting, before going back to my work. Avoiding these nuisances was why I forked out for the Creative Cloud in the first place: the promise of your software *just working*, with the mess inherent in updating being taken care of on your end for once, rather than mine.

Could you really not figure out how to migrate settings properly from the relatively minor version change of Photoshop CC 14.2 to Photoshop CC 2014? Even when it's the same installation of Creative Cloud on the same computer, using the same Adobe ID?

Am I going to have to go through the B.S. of re-applying all my global settings every time you make a couple of little additions to Photoshop?
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David Bleja

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Posted 4 years ago

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Chris Cox

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No, you upgraded from Photoshop CC (version 14) to Photoshop CC 2014 (version 15). No different from installing a new version before the cloud.
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David Bleja

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"No different from installing a new version before the cloud."

That's precisely the problem. It should be different.

I'll be surprised if you can provide me with a compelling technical reason why Adobe was able to migrate some settings but unable to migrate others. Just because someone arbitrarily decided to call this "15.0" instead of "14.3" is not a good enough excuse for doing a half-arsed job of migrating settings.

Users don't *want* Photoshop CC 2014 15.0. We just want Photoshop.

We want one Creative Cloud version that is always kept up to date with a trickle of regular updates. You have us bound to endless subscription plans now, so the days of trying to compel us to make upgrades are over. I can't believe you would choose to revert to the behaviour of that old model, where the user experience is uprooted with every major update.

On a similar note, why has CC left the old, out-of-date versions of most Adobe products installed on my PC once it installed the 2014 versions? Redundant doubling-up is one of the cardinal sins for any cloud application, since it's exactly this type of clutter that cloud computing is supposed to eliminate. I know you're still learning as you go, but it just seems like Adobe is being half-arsed at the moment.

Unlike many people , I've been an enthusiastic supprter of the Creative Cloud approach, despite it costing me more. But that was because I assumed you would actually deliver on your promise of doing it right.
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Chris Cox

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No, it really should not be any different - you still need new major versions from time to time.

And it is not arbitrary - major version changes mean that there are changes to the file formats, compatibility changes, etc. Those are just a few of the technical reasons why it is a new major version, and why it is installed separately from the previous major version.

You have Photoshop. But you have a new version, not much different from installing Photoshop 5 and then Photoshop 6, Photoshop 7, etc. The only significant differences are that then you got new boxes and paid for each box, and now you pay by subscription and download the software.

I'm sorry that you seem to be expecting something that was not promised or implied anywhere.
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David Bleja

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You still haven't really addressed either of my criticisms:

(1) Why is Adobe able to sync keyboard shortcuts and panel locations perfectly, while it is unable to sync something as simple as the status of a checkbox on the direct selection tool, or what size thumbnails are used in the layers pallette? It's Without a concrete answer proving otherwise, it's hard to imagine that this is at all technically impossible.

(2) Why is Adobe still using an outdated installation model that installs new versions alongside each other, rather than taking full advantage of the cloud model, and replacing old versions with new versions? Adobe is in the minority with this approach. Most cloud-based software (eg. Steam client, Steam games, EA Origin, Google Drive, Google Chrome, etc.) knows how to properly clean up after itself after a major update, rather than leaving detritus around for the user to deal with.
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Chris Cox

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We can sync all of your preferences (within the same version), but we cannot migrate all of your preferences from previous versions yet. We're trying to get there, but it isn't as easy as it sounds under the hood.

As I already explained, it is not outdated - it is a necessity. A new major version is a new application that needs to go in a different directory, maintain separate preferences, etc.

Again, you seem to be expecting things that have no reason to be expected.
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David Bleja

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I was a bit abrasive on this thread last year. I wanted to come back and say that I've just updated from CC2014 to CC2015, and the process was much smoother this time. Almost all settings so far seemed to have synced seamlessly, including the ones I complained about last time, and unlike last time, the old CC2014 files have been deleted.

You've obviously done a lot of work to clean up the transition process since last time, and I'm very grateful for that. I'm not deluding myself in thinking I was the catalyst for this, but I wanted to say thanks anyway.

There's another issue that I didn't explicitly mention last time, but which I also think (not 100% sure) has been improved: this time around: I felt I was made more explicitly aware of the major version change.

I think that was the most annoying part of the process last time: I barely even realised that I was updating the software, yet I was being told that I should have treated it just like a pre-cloud retail upgrade.

I never had a problem with the disruptive process of a retail upgrade, because I was psychologically prepared for it: I paid a lot of money for a big heavy box, I put the discs in myself, I uninstalled the previous version manually....I knew what I was getting myself in for. But when the cloud switched me from CC to CC2014, all it took was a few clicks....I wasn't prepared for the process to be as disruptive as it was.

I get the feeling you've made some UI changes this time around to better reflect the significance of the change from CC2014 to CC2015 (even though the transition is actually much cleaner than ever). So this time, I was actually psychologically prepared for the worst this time, which is better (and ultimately I was pleasantly surprised at how smooth the process was)

I really love the sound of some of the new features, too.

Thanks Chris Cox et al.