Camera Raw: Texture slider not shown in Photoshop 19.1.7 also with my Lightroom Classic 7.5

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Texture slider not shown in Camera raw on Adobe Photoshop cc 2018 version 19.1.7 also my Lightroom CC Version 7.5
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Goms Mac

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Posted 2 months ago

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Bill

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Didn't exist back then, you need to update your software. 

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Steve Kenny

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I am not sure exactly when the Texture slider was added to ACR, but I am quite sure that it was NOT available in PS CC 2018. I do not use LR, so have nothing to offer regarding that.
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Dave Grainger

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I think you should update to the current version of CC2020; cost is no different.
 Unless, of course, your computer is too old.
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Goms Mac

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I am using widows 7  64 bit OS
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Dave Grainger

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So am I. You should update to the current release of CC 2020, with one caveat: be sure that your driver for the video circuit is current. You should go to the website for your GPU's manufacturer and get the latest, as using the Windows / System / Device Manager / update driver will quite likely tell you that you are already current when you are not.
(Edited)
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Bill

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Since you are going to have to pay for a version of Lightroom to get the Texture slider, might as well go to the latest. You also NEED to get of Windows 7 and get on 10, do that first before upgrading Lightroom. 

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Dave Grainger

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If he is on 2018 CC would he not have a CC subscription? I run CC 2020 very well on Windows 7...
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Goms Mac

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in the declaimer windows 7 cannot support  cc 2020 so i use cc 2018
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Current versions Photoshop (21.x), Camera Raw (12.x) and Lightroom Classic (9.x) run on Windows 7 64-bit. That said, Windows 7 is no longer supported by Microsoft. Future versions most likely won't be supported on Windows 7 given Microsoft's dropping support.
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Dave Grainger

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"Not support" does not necessarily mean "it won't run"
A large number of corporate users are using Windows 7, and some are still on XP because of investment sunk into proprietary software that required XP back then...

Microsoft made a massive effort (self serving effort) to get people to switch to Windows 10, including putting the strong arm on other software makers to promote the fear that customer's machines might even quit working!  I had several hundred support customers in my business, many of whom telephoned in a panic due to those ads and warning popups.   The reaction when Microsoft started doing so was similar to the earlier Y2K frenzy. Back then, I did more revenue in the last quarter of 1999 than any other quarter in twenty years, but the sun DID rise on New Years Day 2000, and the gas pumps still worked.

Microsoft EOL for Windows 7 does not mean that Windows 7 will stop Functioning, nor will programs that are installed. It simply means that code updates will no longer be done. Almost NO retail customer ever contacts Microsoft for tech issues; they contact their trusted non Microsoft support service anyway.  Corporate users WILL still have access to Microsoft support.  Windows 10, under the hood, is largely Windows 7 with the bolts and rivets tightened and some fresh paint in the sense that things have different names for existing functions. Windows 10 was conceived in part to distance Microsoft from the bad odor of failed Windows 8, and for Product Differentiation / Marketing reasons.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Correct, customers can 'toaster' an old machine with Windows 7 and old software on it. I just want to temper any expectations that future versions will run on an old OS - and conversely, old versions of Photoshop won't necessarily run on future OSes - as seen with recent Catalina upgrade.
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Dave Grainger

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I was told by a Microsoft employee that there is so much dead code in Windows that cannot be pruned that  a total rewrite to a new version would be extremely costly, and it also would be destructive to the customer base as it has, in the business world, such a huge investment in software designed around compatibility with Windows. Part of the problem is the fundamental design of Windows as a humongous database app and not really an OS. Another problem is that the task of rediscovering what all that dead code does do or did do would be insurmountable and also would not return any revenues for doing so: nobody knows what a lot of it is, and are reticent to pull the "keystone in the arch" for fear of collapse.
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