Support for Retired Professionals

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This conversation has been merged. Please reference the main conversation: Photoshop: Provide discount for disabled customers and senior citizens

For 20 years I was a fully licensed professional user of CS, from early days to the last CS edition. Over the decades I have paid many thousands of Euros for my CS software licenses, and have used the full suite. Now, however, I am retired on a modest pension. I wish to continue using Photoshop for my home photographs, but I cannot afford the CC fees. However, since my Mac Pro running MacOS High Sierra is going all 64 bit I cannot continue to use my old licensed software, that is now legacy software. I must upgrade. An alternative to Photoshop is GIMP but I would prefer to remain with Photoshop. I recommend that Adobe make a low cost single-user subscription available for retired professionals. It would be simple to acquire proof of age and pension entitlement, after which the single user could remain authenticated in the system. I hope to hear a positive response from Adobe to this suggestions.
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Baron Bar

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Posted 6 months ago

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Robin Curtis

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I agree so much.  However your position goes against the model of wringing every possible dollar out of us.  Remember when banks paid interest!  On my average $30,000 balance i am getting $1.55 per month.  I used to get interest on checking.
I understand the problem of people passing around their install CDs thus ripping off Adobe or whomever.   Maybe there is something in between.  I am still using my Photoshop 5.5 from 1999 on a windows 7 machine.  For the stuff i do that is just fine.
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Baron Bar

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I am earning some extra money by teaching mathematics and computer science. For this I invested some of my savings in upgrading my Mac Pro 5,1 (12 core) with new processors, fast DRAM, SSD boot drive and NVIDIA QUADRO graphics card, for a modest outlay. It is a 9 year-old computer, but on all benchmarks it now out performs the current model Mac Pro costing over €10,000 if purchased new. I thought that this was a really good deal. However, I find that the new MacOS High Sierra is going all 64 bit. The last paid up licensed CS4 Photoshop I have is 32 bit software. Since photography is strictly a hobby these days, I cannot afford to pay the monthly fee to upgrade this, and my hobby would not justify the expense. Adobe would gain loyalty by rewarding long term paying customers with a reduced seniors' price. Incidentally, I have always had the policy of buying my software. Even opensource software has always received a contribution from me. I think it is fair for Adobe to acknowledge that and return something to the community of honest users.
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Cristen Gillespie

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> Adobe would gain loyalty by rewarding long term paying customers with a reduced seniors' price. >

Just out of curiosity, how much less than $10 a month should Adobe charge Seniors for PS/LR? And if you will find the cost of a new Mac prohibitive (and who doesn't?<G>), how will that help as the software stops supporting the last OS your computer can run?

It almost sounds to me as if a better deal would be allowing you to buy, at a special reduced price, a slightly older version of CC as a perpetual license. Maybe making this a standing offer to Seniors and replacing the "latest" perpetual version every few years with a slightly more current version.

For Adobe, just handling that would be an accounting nightmare, but possibly they could do something along the lines of the old CS6, only more recent, and with the proviso that there would be no technical support, no upgrades.

But that might help with the big expense, which is the computer that will run the next gen software, by letting you sit tight with an older OS and computer for longer.

This is probably all just dream talk since I can't think of any company that gives Seniors big discounts, and they give students those discounts (some  companies, anyway) because they're future customers—it's a prudent and often fruitful investment in the future. The same can't be said for Seniors. However, perhaps if you made a concrete proposal that covered their accounting costs, they could think about a goodwill gesture.
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mrf064

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I'm in exactly the same position.  I believe Students get a hefty discount.  I see no reason why Seniors should be treated differently (we have even less money than they do).
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1inthelight

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Same position here also.  It is getting to the point, financially, that I am going to have to choose between CC or another program such as Affinity Photo.  I love Photoshop, and would prefer to keep it, but when you reach retirement, with the lower income, prioritizing expenses becomes very important.  Totally agree that we have WAY less money than students do, and after all we've paid Adobe over the years, we surely deserve some kind of seniors discount!
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Kukurykus

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Baron Bar

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Very well spotted. Let's hope Adobe is listening. 
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Chris Powers

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Go sign up for a class, any class, at a community college & get a school email address--this alone will get you the student discount. Or if that's not working out for you, find a student (family member, neighbor, etc) who will let you use their email to sign up as a student. You don't even need access to that email account once you join--I'd recommend a year at a time....I've known some professionals (albeit unethically) have the student version for years and years until they made enough money to not have to get it the cheapest.
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Baron Bar

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Next academic year I will be teaching at a university once again, but this time around as a part time tutor. I have a teenager at home who is completing his university entrance exams, but as we are home schooling there is no registration with a school at this time. When we finishes his exams throught the state examinations (Staatsexamen Nederland) he will become a student at the university, starting in 2019-20 academic year. I could wait until this happens. With respect to unethical use of software, it has been my policy all my life not to do this, hence this discussion. I have not put a cracked Photoshop CS6 on my machine, although it has been offered to me. Incidentally, rather than pay Microsoft for MS Office, I am converting my files to use the Apple applications: Pages, Numbers and Keynote. They are perfectly adequate. I am also going to try Affinity Photo. I may find it to be just as adequate. Does Affinity Photo do masking layers at 16 bit colour depth in L*a*b* colour space with very large files (up to 500 MB) from camera RAW sources? If so, Adobe has lost a well trained formerly loyal customer who will be telling colleagues and students alike about Affinity Photo. Adobe may have to accept the losses that come with a product that is priced out of the market.
(Edited)
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Cristen Gillespie

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Since I started to use Tony Kuyper's Luminosity panels for mask, I quit using LAB for masking, but Affinity does work in LAB and at 16 bit. I haven't used it for compositing, and my camera is only 24 MP. No 500 MB files straight out of camera. I get there quickly enough, though, in PS, and I am sure I could do the same in Affinity. 500 MB isn't really all that large unless it's your starting point.<G>

I find that Affinity does have a greater chance of crashing on my computers, and have read similar reports on their FB page, but in the main, it does a pretty decent job and has some very nice ways of implementing features that are very much like Photoshop's. I know it's capable of loading fairly large multi-layered composites mostly intact and editable.  Out of curiosity, I just loaded a 1.22 GB layered file and it opened in what looks to be an editable state. It's 8 bits, not 16, but if it can load an 8 bit file that large, it can handle your 16 bit file.

I don't find it a replacement for PS, though. Learning curve aside, I keep bumping into things that are missing or no better than PS's own. I'm plugging away at learning to use it in my spare time because I'm curious to explore several options out there. I just haven't found one that was worth a permanent switch so long as the Photography Plan isn't all that expensive. I mainly use the apps as plugins to PS, and as such some that have gone the full editor route do have some nice extras. 
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Baron Bar

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My 500 MB files are not straight out of the camera, but with stitching I get there very quickly. Yesterday, I purchased Affinity after watching a good selection of their instruction videos. It seems to do everything I need. I posted a question on the forum, and in less than a minute (on Sunday) I had an answer from one of the developers. I was impressed. It appears to be a small company with highly motivated staff which promises responsive team for support and willingness to listen to users' suggestions. I have purchased the software and ordered the book from which I shall complete the exercises. Learning curves don't put me off; I like the challenge. I see that Affinity's approach to layers is rather different from Photoshop's, giving a non-destructive editing that previously was only available in RAW, and I'm keen to see what the advantages and disadvantages are. I presume they did not make this innovation without good reasons. I did notice that if Affinity is set to save files directly to iCloud, it causes iCloud to crash. The obvious solution is not to set Affinity to iCloud, and store the photograph files in the Pictures directory (the default), which I have on Time Machine backup so that is not a problem. I do not know yet if it is unstable in other respects. Incidentally, I have done everything in L*a*b for many years, and understand the colourspace rather well. L*a*b is the default colourspace for Photoshop files, as you may know, and working in any other colourspace entails a conversion to and from the parent file to the working colourspace. I don't know if Affinity does the same, but since it can also work directly and save to PSD files it probably does. I shall probably keep using L*a*b for the time being.
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Cristen Gillespie

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> derstand the colourspace rather well. L*a*b is the default colourspace for Photoshop files, as you may know,>

Yes, I use it, too, but I do convert when I'm using it.  And I use LAB readouts in RGB mode. But unlike you, I have never used it exclusively.

<< I have purchased the software and ordered the book from which I shall complete the exercises. Learning curves don't put me off; I like the challenge.>>

I always like to hear someone say that. <s>

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