CC Desktop App: Stop placing a desktop shortcut to Adobe Cloud on my desktop with every update

  • 3
  • Idea
  • Updated 7 months ago
  • (Edited)
With every update, Adobe Cloud places a desktop shortcut on my desktop.

I am okay if the software does so at the first installation. But when I delete that shortcut, it means that I don't want to have it there. So please stop placing it there against my will with every update!
Photo of Adobe = Incompetence

Adobe = Incompetence

  • 7 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
  • frustrated

Posted 1 year ago

  • 3
Photo of grauenwölfe

grauenwölfe

  • 216 Posts
  • 79 Reply Likes
Adobe = Incompetence,

If you're on Mac, give this a shot to remove that sidebar folder. Navigate to this folder:
Users/Library/Application Support/Adobe/OOBE

Look for this file:
com.adobe.acc.default.prefs

Open it in a text editor like Text Wrangler, BBEdit, etc. and you'll see this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>

<prefs>

    <property key="createFinderSidebar">true</property>

    <property key="launchAtLogin">true</property>

</prefs>

Change the first property to false. Change both to false if you despise CC Desktop App piece of $#!† as badly as I do. Or you delete the app with Adobe's CC Cleaner Tool.

Save the file. Reboot the machine for good measure, then if it's not already gone, right-click the folder in the sidebar and remove it.
Photo of Adobe = Incompetence

Adobe = Incompetence

  • 7 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
Good contribution. I'm not on a Mac, but others might find this helpful!
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 619 Posts
  • 78 Reply Likes
Curiously interesting.  Where does that happen on a PC?   
Photo of Adobe = Incompetence

Adobe = Incompetence

  • 7 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
What do you mean with "where"?
Misunderstood that question :)
(Edited)
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 619 Posts
  • 78 Reply Likes
This was being addressed to Grauenwolf who came up with a contribution for a Mac fix above;     

For those of us who are not on a Mac, who are on a PC, how or where would that same fix that you performed on a Mac, be performed on a PC?   Otherwise, only those who have a Mac will benefit from your suggestion.   As an engineer, I am not testing your ability, I'd like an answer.   Adobe=incompetence may have a PC instead, or someone else might.   

Steve Lehman, MCSE engineer responding   
(Edited)
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 619 Posts
  • 78 Reply Likes
I would like to add, there are no such files as Grauenwolf mentioned in Windows.  A cloud icon may have been placed if you did any file saving in a cloud.  Those will go away if you let them expire.   
Photo of grauenwölfe

grauenwölfe

  • 216 Posts
  • 79 Reply Likes
There's a lot more to do than just the above. This was only addressing the CC Folder and without knowing if the OP was on Windows or Mac. Also, I have no idea where anything would be on Windows, entirely different file system and structure.
I would like to add, there are no such files as Grauenwolf mentioned in Windows.  A cloud icon may have been placed if you did any file saving in a cloud.  Those will go away if you let them expire.  
Can you not do a search for OOBE? If the file path for Mac is "Users/Library/Application Support/Adobe/OOBE" maybe try and deduce an equivalent location in your Windows file system. It really is just a common preference file that Adobe sticks somewhere other than your common preferences folder. Again, no idea where this may or may not be on Windows.

Regarding Mac, there are account or User level Library LaunchAgents to deal with, Universal level Library LaunchAgents to deal with, root/system level folders like .var, etc., that need addressing. User prefs, Library prefs... Common, Sandbox, and more. Ugh, it's everywhere. Adobe splatters their CC mini-OS all over the system. It's a nightmare to deal with, Mac or Windows.
(Edited)
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 619 Posts
  • 78 Reply Likes
Welcome back Grauenwolf and hello to Adobe=incompetence,    

I apologize for not contributing to your Mac resolution, and thank you for your contribution.

No there is no file by that name on a PC.  Windows uses hidden attributes, hiding files that can do harm to the computer if tampered.  Windows is a much more intricate and complex system than Mac.  As a Windows engineer, I don't work with Mac because it doesn't have a binary interpreter for machine programming transfers, and as such, it doesn't have the safeguards for amateurs who may tamper with its root files.   In Windows, DOS does key-logging, recording Windows changes.

You probably found files in Mac because Mac consolidates everything into one mesh where all the files are together including its root directories, easy to find, but makes for a dangerous environment when typical users make changes.  Typical users are not an engineer like yourself maybe.  You may have found this file before, and you're used to making its changes.  The question is, is it safe for a typical user?   As an engineer, I don't take chances if a user might crash their Operating System by merely deleting a small file in the root directory.  Even in Windows, it's not safe for a tech to use SFC commands, a WindowsShell, or the RegEdit - unless schooled.  

And I say this so typical users who may be reading won't cut loose on their PC.  Commands in the root will crash the system faster than they can say it.  

What you were displaying above were root directories and programming as you explained to change a false to a true, etc which is understood by an engineer but not a typical user.  If a typical user were to use that same root directory and simply change one to false and another to true in a wrong combination, they could crash their computer just from their own wrong decision.  In Windows, a PC can crash and never be recovered.  This is why I wouldn't direct a user to tamper with root directories, and Mac files are too easily found apparently.  

In Windows we don't use phrases such as "false" or "true" because even if they are interpreted by an engineer, they can also be misinterpreted.  Instead we use "1's" and "zeros" in place of those words - not to confuse a typical user, but changes to files can be accurately permanent.  Remember the word 'permanent' in my phrasing.  

Any engineer or tech will tell you that the most dreaded problems when a user cannot remember what they did, and whatever it was, it's permanent. We like to resolve machine induced problems, but not something induced by a typical user.   

I know you are bored now, but I want to give an example to everyone reading this:  

In 2002, a typical user called because he "felt like an engineer" and opened up his PC while it was running and waved a magnetic screw driver around the inside of his running PC. He found that the box had a magnetic field and as he waved the magnet on his screw driver, he made his screen do funny things.   That's what he remembered.   What he didn't remember until later, was:  the screw driver magnetically got stuck to a chip on the board which was also magnetic.  The chip that his screw driver was stuck to, emitted a blue spark.  He felt an electrical zap in his hand.  His screen turned off.   At that point, his PC was officially dead.   That's because of this:     

His screw drive magnet emptied the BIOS and CMOS.  The POST programming in the BIOS was shorted out as the blue spark represented the programming in the POST being deleted.  The POST is the boot-up sequence that starts the computer.  And, because he opened the PC, he voided its warranty.  The manufacturer rejected his replacement request.  Technical solution:  "Keep the lid shut".   

I don't mean to bore you so I will cut to the quick.   

I left Microsoft in 1999 to go into business and I still teach my technicians like I taught technology at Microsoft.  In the 90's I was into photo software, on-loan to Adobe, and I was in their Seattle facility for the first Photoshop.   I am still working with photos in my business.   I help Adobe when time permits.   I invite you to help Mac users in the future, but be careful with what you say.   

Steve Lehman, MCSE responding   
Photo of Adobe = Incompetence

Adobe = Incompetence

  • 7 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
And what does this all have to do with Adobe placing shortcuts on my desktop on every update?
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 619 Posts
  • 78 Reply Likes
Nothing if you're not following our programming.   
Photo of matthew.kuzma

matthew.kuzma

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
Yes, I hate this.  FIX IT, Adobe!