Lightroom: Sony A7RM2 - Auto Rotate Error

  • 1
  • Problem
  • Updated 2 years ago
  • (Edited)
About 10% of my files imported from my Sony A7RM2 do not auto rotate into position correctly.  I shoot raw in the Sony.  The files import into Lightroom 6.5.1 and display as skewed several degrees from straight up and down.  Skewed a 5 to 10 degrees up to almost 90 degrees in some cases.  

The files display properly on the back screen of the camera and they show correctly oriented in Finder and Preview on my Macbook Pro Retina with Yosemite OS X 10.10.5.

I've had cases were I shot exposure bracketed on a tripod and one or two of the multiple shots will be skewed and the others will not.  The camera did not move between the shots.  I was wondering if the problem was the camera and the level sensor, but the files display properly on the camera and in in Finder and Preview.  Only in Lightroom does the problem occur.  I just updated to Lightroom 6.5.1 today, although the problem has been occurring since i got the Sony.  I never had this problem with other cameras.
Photo of Augsburg57

Augsburg57

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 3 years ago

  • 1
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2657 Posts
  • 341 Reply Likes

I would guess from your description that you have customized your LR defaults for your new camera (or perhaps applied a preset during Import) to have one of the Upright function engaged by default:  Auto, Level, Vertical or Full, so for a newly imported image, check in the Lens Corrections, Basic tab and see if an Upright button is enabled other than None.

Also, there is an Auto button next to the Straighten ruler in the Crop area up top.  I don't know if this can be enabled and saved as a customized default, though.

If you have not knowingly customized your LR defaults for your camera then you can reset the LR defaults back to the Adobe default by pressing the Alt or Opt key, and clicking on the button at the lower right of Develop that now says Set Default... and choose Restore Adobe Default settings.

If you have knowingly customized your LR defaults for your camera, on a newly imported photo, set upright to None and resave the defaults to those settings.


Photo of Augsburg57

Augsburg57

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thanks Steve.  I am investigating your suggestions.  I think you are on the right track - but I'm not exactly sure.  

First of all, I did not knowing customize my LR defaults, but I will check if i inadvertently did.  

Secondly, what is really weird is I have numerous instances where only a few shots display cockeyed.  For example, I shot about 60 exposure bracket shots one day on a tripod.  That is 180 images in groups of three shots fired off together.  90% of the shots (groups of 3) were fine.  About 10% had one or two of the three exposure bracketed shots that are skewed - however all three were shot on a tripod at the same time.  Why so sporadic an error?  Maybe I should check my LR cache size - since the files are so large?

Back to your suggestions.  I did look at the Lens Corrections, Basic tab and "Reanalyze" was set to "Auto".  Turning it off immediately corrected a couple of images that I tried that had been skewed.  Still not sure why this is a problem intermittently.  Preliminarily, it does appear turning off "Auto" fixes the problem after import, however.  

I will look at my LR defaults for my Sony camera (the problem only occurs with the Sony A7 RM2).

Thanks again.

Ted
(Edited)
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2657 Posts
  • 341 Reply Likes

If you have not knowingly customized your LR defaults, then Restore Adobe Defaults as described in my previous reply.

LR defaults are saved per camera so it would make sense that only one camera is affected.

Why things are only skewed on some images is probably because Upright - Auto cannot find enough vertical and horizontal lines in whatever images you have to determine a perspective correction, so it just fails for most of your images.  There would likely be a message that no correction was found.  I'm guessing these aren't photos of buildings or other man-made structures with clean vertical and horizontal lines.  You probably want to go and reset Upright to None on all your A7M2 images, though, just in case a slight correction was made that you haven't noticed.

If the images you're shooting during your bracketed session don't have many lines to correct using then, depending on what areas are too bright or too dark, Upright may or may not detect enough straight edges to correct with.

If you're unfamiliar with what Upright does, here is a good demonstration and tutorial:

https://helpx.adobe.com/lightroom/how-to/lightroom-correct-perspective-upright.html

(Edited)
Photo of Augsburg57

Augsburg57

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thanks Steve.  

I did follow your suggestion to restore Adobe defaults.  I hesitated at first, as it was not clear to me what I'd end up with - I'm not happy that LR does not make it clearer in regards to what this would do before I clicked and committed myself.  Perhaps I am unaware of a page or menu that shows me just what this did - that is exactly what default settings I now have for import since I restored to "Adobe defaults".   I don't see anything about this in the Preferences, which is the obvious place I'd look for it.  I'll have to look into it more next time I have photos to import.

I now understand better what was happening with the straightening "feature".  The photos I took at Antelope Canyon in AZ don't have a single straight line.  Interesting that changing the exposure of the exact same photo caused the Upright feature to work in one image and get confused in another.  
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2657 Posts
  • 341 Reply Likes

When you click Alt/Opt and Set Default... (that the Reset button turns into) you have two things you can do besides Cancel, either restore Adobe defaults or update the defaults to the current settings and you must have inadvertently done the latter.  Since it is at least a 3-action (press, click, click) process, you'll have to see if you can remember when you might have done such a thing (or imagine who else might have on your behalf) and for what purpose. 

The LR Defaults, either Adobe's or what you might customize to, are what settings you Import photos with unless you apply a preset and are what settings photos return to if you click Reset (without the Alt or Opt key pressed).

Restore Adobe Defaults doesn't reset your LR preferences to Adobe defaults, the settings about how big your DNG preview should be or how big your video cache should be or whether to automatically apply auto-tone adjustments or automatically wrote XMP metadata to files, or prevent sleeping during Export, all that you see in LR / Edit / Preferences, the LR defaults are the initial settings of imported and reset photos.

The reason you might want to customize your LR defaults, or the reason I have, is to turn on Default lens profile detection instead of Auto, and automatically apply chromatic aberration correction--two things that might use more CPU and wouldn't want for every photo if my computer wasn't good enough, as well as having a high initial Sharpen Mask setting in the 80s or 80s instead of the default of 0 because using a mask of 0 sharpens noise the same as real image details.

I want these same three things customized for each of my cameras, so when I get a new camera one of the first things I do is import a new photo, change these three things, and save the current settings as the new LR defaults.  Now anything I import after that will have those new settings, initially. 

If you were unsure what clicking on a particular button would do then Google would have found any number of explanatory pages and videos about it.

Photo of Eikon

Eikon

  • 7 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Thanks for this question and the answers. Just saved me a bunch of time!!