Lightroom Classic: Slideshow should use same ProPhoto RGB color space as Development module.

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I am compiling a night timelapse, and my photos have several hot pixels. Lightroom Classic removes the hot pixels automatically in development module, so everything looks great. But when I switch to slideshow module, the hot pixels are back. How can I get my photos in slideshow mode to look exactly like they do in development mode?

According to Adobe engineer Ravi, in  support case ADB-10119837-N0D9:
This difference is due to the color space that is used by the two modules in lightroom. So the develop mode in Lightroom uses the ProPhoto RGB color space which has a very high color range whereas the slideshow mode uses Adobe RGB which compared to the ProPhoto RGB has a lower color range.

This is a product limitation, and it needs to be addressed because nobody ever wants to see a lower quality version of their photos in a slideshow.
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Kevin Farrell

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Posted 5 months ago

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Cristen Gillespie

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I don't have an answer for you, but a question. Most printers won't even print the full range of ProPhotoRGB, although they may print more of the colors than Adobe RGB. But can a monitor, TV, or projector, outside of a color managed program like PS, use ProPhoto? If you aren't in an environment that can display what you're seeing with ProPhoto when editing the slideshow, aren't you running the risk of your slideshow displaying exactly as you're now seeing?

I'm just wondering if a better solution, at least unless or until you could be certain that anyone viewing your slideshow could handle ProPhoto, to develop in an AdobeRGB workspace if possible?

I'm very willing to be enlightened here.
(Edited)
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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The Develop module builds its previews automatically real-time, which is why you don't see the hot pixels. You need to build 1:1 Previews in the Library module for all of the image files. This is what the slideshow module uses. It should remove the hot pixels and appear the same as when viewed in the Develop module.
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Kevin Farrell

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Todd,  I will try that and write back.
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Kevin Farrell

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Todd, your solution works!  U da MAN!!  Thanks
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Kevin Farrell

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Cristen, 

Thanks for reading my post, and maybe I wasn't clear.  I'm not printing these photos or view them on a TV, monitor, or projector.

I'm taking a timelapsed sequence of photos of the night sky and rendering video directly from those photos, which are totally developed and looking great in the Lightroom module.  The way to do it is through a user defined template in the Slideshow module, which makes a mp4 file.  However, Slideshow is exporting and rendering lower quality images than the ones that I can see in the Develop module.   

As a workaround, I will have to export all of my photos from Lightroom, and then use some other application to render them into video.


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Cristen Gillespie

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> I'm taking a timelapsed sequence of photos of the night sky and rendering video directly from those photos, which are totally developed and looking great in the Lightroom module.

I see. Thanks for enlightening me. I haven't thought of rendering video out of LR, but it's good to now be aware of potential rendering differences between the modules. I hope Todd's suggested workflow works out for you.

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Kevin Farrell

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The solution provided by @Todd Shaner worked. 

I went to  Library > Previews and selected the preview type 1:1.   

All is well.
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Kevin Farrell

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..by the way, it took me 5 hours to convert 660 photos to preview type 1:1
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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Glad to hear that fixed the issue. It appears something is wrong with your system or settings. 660 files 1:1 previews @ 5 hrs = 27 sec. per image file. On my system using Canon 5D MKII 21 Mp raw files it takes 2.0 sec per image file to build 1:1 previews, which is 14x faster. What camera model and file type are you using? In LR Edit> Preferences> Performance try checking 'Generate Previews in parallel.' That should help, but I suspect you have other issues. For further troubleshooting please go to LR Help> System Info and Copy & Paste it in a reply here.
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Kevin Farrell

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Hi Todd,
My raw images are CR2 and each is 23MB.  I used a lot of developing on them, and the issue might be the adjustment brush, which I used on a large area of many of these photos. 
After reading your email, I tried building a couple other 1:1 previews on other photos in my catalog, and it was only taking a second or so for those.  

The camera is a EOS 7D MKii

Here's the output you requested:

Lightroom Classic version: 9.0 [ 201910151439-b660523e ]
License: Creative Cloud
Language setting: en
Operating system: Windows 10 - Business Edition
Version: 10.0.17763
Application architecture: x64
System architecture: x64
Logical processor count: 8
Processor speed: 4.0 GHz
Built-in memory: 32716.5 MB
Real memory available to Lightroom: 32716.5 MB
Real memory used by Lightroom: 1476.1 MB (4.5%)
Virtual memory used by Lightroom: 1778.4 MB
GDI objects count: 790
USER objects count: 2618
Process handles count: 2159
Memory cache size: 0.5MB
Internal Camera Raw version: 12.0 [ 321 ]
Maximum thread count used by Camera Raw: 5
Camera Raw SIMD optimization: SSE2,AVX,AVX2
Camera Raw virtual memory: 16MB / 16358MB (0%)
Camera Raw real memory: 17MB / 32716MB (0%)
System DPI setting: 96 DPI
Desktop composition enabled: Yes
Displays: 1) 1920x1200, 2) 1680x1050
Input types: Multitouch: No, Integrated touch: No, Integrated pen: No, External touch: No, External pen: No, Keyboard: No

Graphics Processor Info: 
DirectX: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti (26.21.14.3086)



Application folder: C:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Lightroom Classic
Library Path: B:\LightroomPhoto\CurrentCatalog\Lightroom Catalog-2.lrcat
Settings Folder: C:\Users\kfarrel2\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Lightroom

Installed Plugins: 
1) AdobeStock
2) Facebook
3) Flickr
4) Nikon Tether Plugin

Config.lua flags: 
Tools.OldBackupImplementation = true

Adapter #1: Vendor : 10de
Device : 1380
Subsystem : 36ca1458
Revision : a2
Video Memory : 4053
Adapter #2: Vendor : 1414
Device : 8c
Subsystem : 0
Revision : 0
Video Memory : 0
AudioDeviceIOBlockSize: 1024
AudioDeviceName: Realtek HD Audio 2nd output (Realtek High Definition Audio)
AudioDeviceNumberOfChannels: 2
AudioDeviceSampleRate: 48000
Build: 12.1x4
Direct2DEnabled: false
GL_ACCUM_ALPHA_BITS: 16
GL_ACCUM_BLUE_BITS: 16
GL_ACCUM_GREEN_BITS: 16
GL_ACCUM_RED_BITS: 16
GL_ALPHA_BITS: 0
GL_BLUE_BITS: 8
GL_DEPTH_BITS: 24
GL_GREEN_BITS: 8
GL_MAX_3D_TEXTURE_SIZE: 2048
GL_MAX_TEXTURE_SIZE: 16384
GL_MAX_TEXTURE_UNITS: 4
GL_MAX_VIEWPORT_DIMS: 16384,16384
GL_RED_BITS: 8
GL_RENDERER: GeForce GTX 750 Ti/PCIe/SSE2
GL_SHADING_LANGUAGE_VERSION: 4.60 NVIDIA
GL_STENCIL_BITS: 8
GL_VENDOR: NVIDIA Corporation
GL_VERSION: 4.6.0 NVIDIA 430.86
GPUDeviceEnabled: false
OGLEnabled: true
GL_EXTENSIONS: GL_AMD_multi_draw_indirect GL_AMD_seamless_cubemap_per_texture GL_ARB_arrays_of_arrays GL_ARB_base_instance GL_ARB_bindless_texture GL_ARB_blend_func_extended GL_ARB_buffer_storage GL_ARB_clear_buffer_object GL_ARB_clear_texture GL_ARB_clip_control GL_ARB_color_buffer_float GL_ARB_compatibility GL_ARB_compressed_texture_pixel_storage GL_ARB_conservative_depth GL_ARB_compute_shader GL_ARB_compute_variable_group_size GL_ARB_conditional_render_inverted GL_ARB_copy_buffer GL_ARB_copy_image GL_ARB_cull_distance GL_ARB_debug_output GL_ARB_depth_buffer_float GL_ARB_depth_clamp GL_ARB_depth_texture GL_ARB_derivative_control GL_ARB_direct_state_access GL_ARB_draw_buffers GL_ARB_draw_buffers_blend GL_ARB_draw_indirect GL_ARB_draw_elements_base_vertex GL_ARB_draw_instanced GL_ARB_enhanced_layouts GL_ARB_ES2_compatibility GL_ARB_ES3_compatibility GL_ARB_ES3_1_compatibility GL_ARB_ES3_2_compatibility GL_ARB_explicit_attrib_location GL_ARB_explicit_uniform_location GL_ARB_fragment_coord_conventions GL_ARB_fragment_layer_viewport GL_ARB_fragment_program GL_ARB_fragment_program_shadow GL_ARB_fragment_shader GL_ARB_framebuffer_no_attachments GL_ARB_framebuffer_object GL_ARB_framebuffer_sRGB GL_ARB_geometry_shader4 GL_ARB_get_program_binary GL_ARB_get_texture_sub_image GL_ARB_gl_spirv GL_ARB_gpu_shader5 GL_ARB_gpu_shader_fp64 GL_ARB_gpu_shader_int64 GL_ARB_half_float_pixel GL_ARB_half_float_vertex GL_ARB_imaging GL_ARB_indirect_parameters GL_ARB_instanced_arrays GL_ARB_internalformat_query GL_ARB_internalformat_query2 GL_ARB_invalidate_subdata GL_ARB_map_buffer_alignment GL_ARB_map_buffer_range GL_ARB_multi_bind GL_ARB_multi_draw_indirect GL_ARB_multisample GL_ARB_multitexture GL_ARB_occlusion_query GL_ARB_occlusion_query2 GL_ARB_parallel_shader_compile GL_ARB_pipeline_statistics_query GL_ARB_pixel_buffer_object GL_ARB_point_parameters GL_ARB_point_sprite GL_ARB_polygon_offset_clamp GL_ARB_program_interface_query GL_ARB_provoking_vertex GL_ARB_query_buffer_object GL_ARB_robust_buffer_access_behavior GL_ARB_robustness GL_ARB_sample_shading GL_ARB_sampler_objects GL_ARB_seamless_cube_map GL_ARB_seamless_cubemap_per_texture GL_ARB_separate_shader_objects GL_ARB_shader_atomic_counter_ops GL_ARB_shader_atomic_counters GL_ARB_shader_ballot GL_ARB_shader_bit_encoding GL_ARB_shader_clock GL_ARB_shader_draw_parameters GL_ARB_shader_group_vote GL_ARB_shader_image_load_store GL_ARB_shader_image_size GL_ARB_shader_objects GL_ARB_shader_precision GL_ARB_shader_storage_buffer_object GL_ARB_shader_subroutine GL_ARB_shader_texture_image_samples GL_ARB_shader_texture_lod GL_ARB_shading_language_100 GL_ARB_shading_language_420pack GL_ARB_shading_language_include GL_ARB_shading_language_packing GL_ARB_shadow GL_ARB_sparse_buffer GL_ARB_sparse_texture GL_ARB_spirv_extensions GL_ARB_stencil_texturing GL_ARB_sync GL_ARB_tessellation_shader GL_ARB_texture_barrier GL_ARB_texture_border_clamp GL_ARB_texture_buffer_object GL_ARB_texture_buffer_object_rgb32 GL_ARB_texture_buffer_range GL_ARB_texture_compression GL_ARB_texture_compression_bptc GL_ARB_texture_compression_rgtc GL_ARB_texture_cube_map GL_ARB_texture_cube_map_array GL_ARB_texture_env_add GL_ARB_texture_env_combine GL_ARB_texture_env_crossbar GL_ARB_texture_env_dot3 GL_ARB_texture_filter_anisotropic GL_ARB_texture_float GL_ARB_texture_gather GL_ARB_texture_mirror_clamp_to_edge GL_ARB_texture_mirrored_repeat GL_ARB_texture_multisample GL_ARB_texture_non_power_of_two GL_ARB_texture_query_levels GL_ARB_texture_query_lod GL_ARB_texture_rectangle GL_ARB_texture_rg GL_ARB_texture_rgb10_a2ui GL_ARB_texture_stencil8 GL_ARB_texture_storage GL_ARB_texture_storage_multisample GL_ARB_texture_swizzle GL_ARB_texture_view GL_ARB_timer_query GL_ARB_transform_feedback2 GL_ARB_transform_feedback3 GL_ARB_transform_feedback_instanced GL_ARB_transform_feedback_overflow_query GL_ARB_transpose_matrix GL_ARB_uniform_buffer_object GL_ARB_vertex_array_bgra GL_ARB_vertex_array_object GL_ARB_vertex_attrib_64bit GL_ARB_vertex_attrib_binding GL_ARB_vertex_buffer_object GL_ARB_vertex_program GL_ARB_vertex_shader GL_ARB_vertex_type_10f_11f_11f_rev GL_ARB_vertex_type_2_10_10_10_rev GL_ARB_viewport_array GL_ARB_window_pos GL_ATI_draw_buffers GL_ATI_texture_float GL_ATI_texture_mirror_once GL_S3_s3tc GL_EXT_texture_env_add GL_EXT_abgr GL_EXT_bgra GL_EXT_bindable_uniform GL_EXT_blend_color GL_EXT_blend_equation_separate GL_EXT_blend_func_separate GL_EXT_blend_minmax GL_EXT_blend_subtract GL_EXT_compiled_vertex_array GL_EXT_Cg_shader GL_EXT_depth_bounds_test GL_EXT_direct_state_access GL_EXT_draw_buffers2 GL_EXT_draw_instanced GL_EXT_draw_range_elements GL_EXT_fog_coord GL_EXT_framebuffer_blit GL_EXT_framebuffer_multisample GL_EXTX_framebuffer_mixed_formats GL_EXT_framebuffer_multisample_blit_scaled GL_EXT_framebuffer_object GL_EXT_framebuffer_sRGB GL_EXT_geometry_shader4 GL_EXT_gpu_program_parameters GL_EXT_gpu_shader4 GL_EXT_multi_draw_arrays GL_EXT_packed_depth_stencil GL_EXT_packed_float GL_EXT_packed_pixels GL_EXT_pixel_buffer_object GL_EXT_point_parameters GL_EXT_polygon_offset_clamp GL_EXT_provoking_vertex GL_EXT_rescale_normal GL_EXT_secondary_color GL_EXT_separate_shader_objects GL_EXT_separate_specular_color GL_EXT_shader_image_load_formatted GL_EXT_shader_image_load_store GL_EXT_shader_integer_mix GL_EXT_shadow_funcs GL_EXT_stencil_two_side GL_EXT_stencil_wrap GL_EXT_texture3D GL_EXT_texture_array GL_EXT_texture_buffer_object GL_EXT_texture_compression_dxt1 GL_EXT_texture_compression_latc GL_EXT_texture_compression_rgtc GL_EXT_texture_compression_s3tc GL_EXT_texture_cube_map GL_EXT_texture_edge_clamp GL_EXT_texture_env_combine GL_EXT_texture_env_dot3 GL_EXT_texture_filter_anisotropic GL_EXT_texture_integer GL_EXT_texture_lod GL_EXT_texture_lod_bias GL_EXT_texture_mirror_clamp GL_EXT_texture_object GL_EXT_texture_shared_exponent GL_EXT_texture_sRGB GL_EXT_texture_sRGB_R8 GL_EXT_texture_sRGB_decode GL_EXT_texture_storage GL_EXT_texture_swizzle GL_EXT_timer_query GL_EXT_transform_feedback2 GL_EXT_vertex_array GL_EXT_vertex_array_bgra GL_EXT_vertex_attrib_64bit GL_EXT_window_rectangles GL_EXT_import_sync_object GL_IBM_rasterpos_clip GL_IBM_texture_mirrored_repeat GL_KHR_context_flush_control GL_KHR_debug GL_EXT_memory_object GL_EXT_memory_object_win32 GL_EXT_win32_keyed_mutex GL_KHR_parallel_shader_compile GL_KHR_no_error GL_KHR_robust_buffer_access_behavior GL_KHR_robustness GL_EXT_semaphore GL_EXT_semaphore_win32 GL_KTX_buffer_region GL_NV_alpha_to_coverage_dither_control GL_NV_bindless_multi_draw_indirect GL_NV_bindless_multi_draw_indirect_count GL_NV_bindless_texture GL_NV_blend_equation_advanced GL_NV_blend_equation_advanced_coherent GL_NV_blend_minmax_factor GL_NV_blend_square GL_NV_command_list GL_NV_compute_program5 GL_NV_conditional_render GL_NV_copy_depth_to_color GL_NV_copy_image GL_NV_depth_buffer_float GL_NV_depth_clamp GL_NV_draw_texture GL_NV_draw_vulkan_image GL_NV_ES1_1_compatibility GL_NV_ES3_1_compatibility GL_NV_explicit_multisample GL_NV_feature_query GL_NV_fence GL_NV_float_buffer GL_NV_fog_distance GL_NV_fragment_program GL_NV_fragment_program_option GL_NV_fragment_program2 GL_NV_framebuffer_multisample_coverage GL_NV_geometry_shader4 GL_NV_gpu_program4 GL_NV_internalformat_sample_query GL_NV_gpu_program4_1 GL_NV_gpu_program5 GL_NV_gpu_program5_mem_extended GL_NV_gpu_program_fp64 GL_NV_gpu_shader5 GL_NV_half_float GL_NV_light_max_exponent GL_NV_multisample_coverage GL_NV_multisample_filter_hint GL_NV_occlusion_query GL_NV_packed_depth_stencil GL_NV_parameter_buffer_object GL_NV_parameter_buffer_object2 GL_NV_path_rendering GL_NV_pixel_data_range GL_NV_point_sprite GL_NV_primitive_restart GL_NV_query_resource GL_NV_query_resource_tag GL_NV_register_combiners GL_NV_register_combiners2 GL_NV_shader_atomic_counters GL_NV_shader_atomic_float GL_NV_shader_atomic_int64 GL_NV_shader_buffer_load GL_NV_shader_storage_buffer_object GL_NV_texgen_reflection GL_NV_texture_barrier GL_NV_texture_compression_vtc GL_NV_texture_env_combine4 GL_NV_texture_multisample GL_NV_texture_rectangle GL_NV_texture_rectangle_compressed GL_NV_texture_shader GL_NV_texture_shader2 GL_NV_texture_shader3 GL_NV_transform_feedback GL_NV_transform_feedback2 GL_NV_uniform_buffer_unified_memory GL_NV_vertex_array_range GL_NV_vertex_array_range2 GL_NV_vertex_attrib_integer_64bit GL_NV_vertex_buffer_unified_memory GL_NV_vertex_program GL_NV_vertex_program1_1 GL_NV_vertex_program2 GL_NV_vertex_program2_option GL_NV_vertex_program3 GL_NVX_conditional_render GL_NVX_gpu_memory_info GL_NVX_multigpu_info GL_NVX_nvenc_interop GL_NV_shader_thread_group GL_NV_shader_thread_shuffle GL_KHR_blend_equation_advanced GL_KHR_blend_equation_advanced_coherent GL_OVR_multiview GL_OVR_multiview2 GL_SGIS_generate_mipmap GL_SGIS_texture_lod GL_SGIX_depth_texture GL_SGIX_shadow GL_SUN_slice_accum GL_WIN_swap_hint WGL_EXT_swap_control


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Cristen Gillespie

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> and the issue might be the adjustment brush, which I used on a large area of many of these photos.

I've heard similar complaints about using the Adj brush extensively in CR, although in those cases they're obviously not talking about rendering 1:1 previews for 600 files.   But I suppose it could be related when it comes to an instruction based workflow.

Still, it's great to hear Todd's workflow has solved the problem of how your images are rendered. A test of one's patience and ability to produce results in a timely fashion is at least slightly better than not being able to produce good results at all.  '-}

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Todd Shaner, Champion

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Kevin, your LR system info looks good so it's probably not due to an issue with your system. You might want to post this as a separate report (1:1 Preview Building Very Long), which will get Adobe's attention. Why is 1:1 Preview Building so much slower (14x) with these 660 image files. I ran on test on 10 image files with about 20 Adjustment Brush spots applied using multiple settings and the 1:1 Preview Building time went from 2.0 sec. to 3.0 sec., which is only a 1.5x increase (1/10th of the increase you're seeing).

The second question should be WHY do you need to manually build 1:1 Previews to have full noise reduction (i.e. hot pixels removed) applied in the Slideshow module. Adobe could simply do that in the background during Slideshow Export.
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Jao van de Lagemaat

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You really shouldn't be doing time lapses in the slideshow module. They're low quality renderings and you have very little control over the output video. The video compression used by the slideshow module is very suboptimal and you end up with gigantic files that have to be run through another compression step. You should simply do this in Photoshop which you should have since it comes with the Photography plan. Bonus is that you can do simple pan and zooms during the time-lapse this way. You just export all images from Lightroom into full sized (or large enough for the video resolution you are targeting) jpegs in sRGB space or use display P3 or adobeRGB 16bit tiffs if you want to do this in HDR video in the end but sRGB jpeg is what you need for standard 1080p or 4k video since that is basically the color space that type of video is in. Bring those into Photoshop as an image sequence and you'll get a timeline where you can manipulate the video and render out to H264 or H265 video. Lots of tutorials on the internet on how to do this.
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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To be honest I've never done a time lapse video, but have done many slideshow videos. I gave up on LR's Slideshow module back in 2013 and started using Proshow. The options, rendering speed, quality, and ease of use rivals anything Adobe has to offer, including Premiere Pro. Having said that the developer Photodex has fallen on hard times and future support is questionable, so I can no longer recommend it.

I haven't used the LR slideshow module in quite a while so gave 9.0 a try. As Jao mentions the LR 1080P video export rendering is very soft and the file size is about 3x the same slideshow video created in PS. So nothing has changed since 2013 concerning quality and file size. You best option is as Jao has outlined using PS.
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Cristen Gillespie

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I loved ProShow when I had it. But I'll have to buy a Windows OS to run it now, probably in BootCamp, which is a PITA. I wish they'd make a Mac version. Back when I got it, they mentioned it, and then apparently decided we'd all be happy to pay for Windows and possibly also a virtual PC such as Parallels.

I looked at FotoMagico for Mac a few years ago. It didn't have enough of what I wanted. It has probably added features. I simply don't want anything too automated. I remember even back when I had ProShow—ages ago now—and was making slideshows fairly often, I did have quite a bit of control. I imagine that's only improved over the years.

AE/PP are a bit of overkill, but most dedicated slideshow software out there decides too much for me in the guise of making it "easy." (sigh) But I've got a large personal project about ready that I want in a slideshow for my family, so. . . it'll soon be something. I don't like either LR or PS for it.
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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You can take a look at Premiere Rush, but it looks pretty dumbed down to me. One of the things I like about Proshow is that you can use any of the metadata fields including keywords for global or slide specific titles and captions metadata. Enter or edit them in LR and they appear automatically inside Proshow. Lacking that it's double-work to enter them in LR and then in the video editor.
IMHO there's no reason why Adobe can't improve the LR Classic Slideshow module other than it's no longer something they want to commit resources to. What a shame.
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Cristen Gillespie

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I tried out Rush. It wasn't for me. I've used AE, and the AE/PP pipeline ought to be even easier since I'm kinda sorta used to the whole thing, but I do wish PS had developed the Timeline more for slideshows without dumbing the whole thing down too much and making it too automatic. I think they're depending upon all of us to love Premiere Elements and go outside CC-land if we want another slideshow editor, but I looked at  maybe 2 years ago and for the price, I couldn't see particularly why I'd choose it.

Still, I suppose it remains an option if it's still being developed. In the meantime, I keep putting the project off—expecting a miracle to happen and ProShow says they're going Mac, or the elves to take over, perhaps? <BG>