PHOTOSHOP - Show the closest tube color [oil] paint from color picker:

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There is now a major renaissance of painting technique, from the muddy alla prima (physical color mixing) to the more realistic Flemish or indirect method of glazing (optical mixing).  And PS is ideally suited to capitalize on it. See Kahinde Wiley for just one example and the changes in his technique.  It allows simplification of painting by nearly eliminating the expertise needed to get accurate flesh and other colors, namely, by using glazed layers of tube color thinned with medium. If not correct, that layer is wiped off the dry previous layer to begin again without loss, exactly analogous to the modification of layers in PS.  This allows access by amateurs to achieve results previously only by very advanced/professional artists.   In painting classes, nearly every student I see struggles, because the instructor has never had instruction in teaching amateurs, and tries to get them to do  accurately in a few weeks what he/she has taken over 3 years to learn.  Not going to happen.  Many don't return. Also, instead of the long expensive training needed to learn accuracy in drawing the modello, a much faster, much more accurate modello is printed from PS to transfer to the panel, allowing the untrained amateur to achieve a pleasing likeness.  The composition can be very quickly changed in PS, not in the sketch.  Drawing instruction remains critically important in portraiture, to train depiction in Levels, but PS could greatly speed success and help prevent discouragement.  Where Adobe can further help, make a more desirable product for the amateur painter, would be an app that would transform the Color Picker to show the nearest tube color from tables of a manufacturer's color charts.  Maybe even suggest 3 colors that, glazed together, would closely approximate the picked color. Obviously there are many issues to be overcome, relating to monitor calibration, manufacturer variation, etc. but imo this would open up a large market for the amateur (esp portrait and still life painters), mean a greater demand for PS.  Finally some of us do not trust the cloud or subscriptions.  We want  a disk or download that is ours, to upgrade when we feel a need.
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Reed L

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Posted 3 years ago

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Chris Cox

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That can already be done by the paint maker - just supply the ACB (color book) file for their paints, and it will be usable in Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, etc.
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Reed L

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Thanks, Chris, I wrote to Old Holland and see if they can send that data.  If I get it, exactly how does one import it into PS (CS5)?  Thanks, Reed
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Chris Cox

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They write their colors as an ACB file, you put it in the presets folder, then it's loaded just like Pantone, Toyo, etc.
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Reed L

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Thanks again, but "exactly how?" means "which exact steps does [the ignorant one] do?  For example it might start "Step 1: Open PS, 2.: Go to ...[  ], 3: Right click/move.....

One wouldn't answer the ignorant's question "How exactly do I make Canard Orange?" by saying "Just make the orange sauce with Gran Marnier and Seville oranges, and baste the bird with it."

I'm a portrait painter, not an IT guy.  BTW, googling Old Holland and ACB yielded zilch.

What is simpler than elementary to a Sr Computer Scientist is not so crystal clear to someone like me.  Take them by the hand as it were. Leave nothing to  chance.

And assuming the paint company rep can even know and get an ACB file.

Still, thank you.

Reed

(Edited)
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Chris Cox

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Creating the ACB File isn't something you do in Photoshop - it would involve some coding or the paint maker contacting the right people to help them.
They would start with a spreadsheet of color names and LAB values, convert that into an ACB file.
But other companies already do that for their color products.

Predicting glazing colors: that isn't so easy, because you'd need spectral data for the paints, primer, and vehicle. Plus at least a set of optimized kubelka-munk coefficients to show how the colors interact (plus a viewing light source, etc.).  That is doable, but it's more of a grad student project than a Photoshop feature.  If that doesn't make sense - don't worry, the paint maker's color scientists will know exactly what it means.