Lightroom Classic: Selecting "Edit in> Edit in AdobePphotoshop CC 2019" Discards lens profile corrections and changes colors

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  • Updated 2 months ago
  • (Edited)
With an image that has been adjusted in Lightroom Classic CC, editing in photoshop and saving as Tiff, the resulting image will have different colors (oversaturated) and have no lens corrections applied. This is extra obvious when you compare the photoshop edited file next to the original in lightroom.
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Eric Bodenchak

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Posted 2 months ago

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Richard Kain

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When you ask Lightroom to go to Photoshop, you should see a dialog where you choose whether you edit the original or the original with Lightroom adjustments. Just choose the "Edit with adjustments" option and you will see the effects of the edits you have made in Lightroom. Then the colors should not be shifted.
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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You only see that dialog if you send a TIFF/JPEG/PSD image from Lightroom to Photoshop, not if you send a raw file.
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Eric Bodenchak

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Thank you, I forgot to mention I am using Canon Raw Files. Also, I didn't know that, I had thought that the option was removed in a previous update but I guess I just didn't notice it had to do with when I switched to raw. 
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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Can you explain exactly what you are doing/seeing? When the TIFF image comes back from Photoshop, it's a new original and so you won't see any edits applied to it in the Develop module, including no lens corrections. That is normal. Those edits (including the lens corrections) have been applied when the image was initially sent from Lightroom to Photoshop however, so they are now 'baked into' the TIFF.

Als check the version numbers of both Lightroom and Photoshop. A mismatch between versions could mean that different profiles will be applied, and that will cause differences in color.
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Richard Kain

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Lens corrections are indeed spread all over the image - consider that one option in lens corrections is to apply a profile. For my systems, the profiles I get from X-Rite have one quite noticeable effect - they increase the saturation of saturated blues and reds. In the sample, it does look as though the blues are more saturated.
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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The corrections are spread, but not evenly. And lens profiles should not change the colors, only camera profiles do. Those X-Rite profiles are camera profiles.
(Edited)
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Eric Bodenchak

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I've just tried it with a building, but a different lens since I don't have an architecture with that lens (Canon 85 1.4L......I wonder if Lightroom has the profile for it but photoshop doesn't? Just spitballing)

The building does show a shift in the colors in the shadows, what was a gray-toned window became blue toned in windows near the edge, but there is no difference in the distortion. 

I feel like the more I'm learning about this the less I know 
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Richard Kain

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I would like to see your architectual example - I suppose that the whites in the  example were bluish because they were in the shadow and got more light from the blue sky. 

In my previous comment I confused the camera profile, which shows up in Lightroom under the Basic header, with the lens profile, which shows up under the Lens Corrections header. Did you have a similar confusion?
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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Eric, Lightroom and Photoshop use the same lens profiles and the same camera profiles. Your problem sounds like an ICC-profile issue. That is why I asked you to show the Lightroom external editor settings and the Photoshop color management policies.
(Edited)
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Simon Chen, Principal Computer Scientist

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You saved as TIFF, the lens correction would have been baked into the pixels if you did apply it in the first place.
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Eric Bodenchak

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It is applied in the original raw, but is not getting baked into the tiff, which is the problem. Side-by-side, the 'shopped' image has uncorrected distortions even though it came from a corrected raw.