Photoshop: Save for Web changes resolution

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I don't know whether this is a flaw or intentional in Photoshop CC 2019 (and possibly earlier versions), but Save for Web changes the resolution of the resulting jpg or png image to 72 dpi (or ppi), regardless of the actual resolution of the originating file. Discovered this while preparing a jpg banner (advertisement) for a publisher that required a 782x90 pixel jpg at 300 dpi (reason for that resolution is unknown). Had to use Save As... to avoid the change in resolution to 72 dpi. It's bad enough that the user is not allowed to set resolution in Save for Web (despite its undeserved "legacy" status), but I can't find any documentation of this in the Save for Web window or online. This is very user unfriendly. I'm posting it because even though Adobe is almost certain to ignore it, other users may benefit from knowing about it.
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Rick Meikle

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Posted 9 months ago

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Cristen Gillespie

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It's been brought up so many times, you'd think they'd change this behavior just to shut everyone up about it. <G>

If printing the banner (seriously?) then 300 dpi is understood. It's the JPEG that isn't. LOL  If for the web, dunno what they think is going to happen in various browsers and on various monitors. Perhaps they  think it will scale better on monitors with higher resolutions if they use a higher ppi. It does sound as if someone has come over from the print side of things and they know what they want, whether they know what they're doing with it or not.

It's obviously upsetting people's clients enough, changing this would be very helpful for the designers.
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JEA

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Save for Web strips the metadata, which includes resolution data as per design so it's not a flaw, and applications opening the file just set an arbitrary resolution, usually being 72 cause they have set something.

Striping the metadata is to keep file size to a minimum for posting on the web.

You can retain the resolution in Save for Web by setting the Metadata to All Except Camera Info or All.


(Edited)
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David Converse

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What he said. All or All Except Camera Info. Otherwise, the ppi data is not saved.
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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A banner of 782x90 pixels is clearly meant for web use, which means the resolution is irrelevant. A printed banner (at 300 dpi) would be 2.61 x 0.3 inch...
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Cristen Gillespie

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Sure it is, otherwise the JPEG is as ridiculous as I said it was, but the client is demanding. If the client wants what the client wants, and they usually do, then there's no reason for Adobe not to fulfill that wish. It will change absolutely nothing in the real world, but since everyone here who has asked has said that it's for a demanding (if ignorant) client, why change the resolution?

At least if Adobe isn't going to change this behavior, then perhaps they should include in the Helpx files the reason the current behavior is beneficial to a workflow, despite the fact that the client wants what the client wants. Then the people posting here could refer their client to some official reason for what they're getting: " but I can't find any documentation of this in the Save for Web window or online. This is very user unfriendly. "
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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Usually ignorant clients ask for 72 dpi resolution if it's for web use. A client who asks for 300 dpi while the image is intended for web use, is quite unusual and kind of double ignorant. Or triple ignorant if you also take into account that images don't have dots...
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Cristen Gillespie

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> Or triple ignorant if you also take into account that images don't have dots...

Well, screens create printing dots. They're not contone. But yes, they're ignorant about what we do. They wrapped their head around "resolution has to be 300," which is quite arbitrary even for a printing press. But early inkjets used to call for that, too, so it's ingrained in some. Clients can't really be expected to understand digital graphics.  And I do keep hearing stories from designers dealing with this. . .I agree it's probably not as common as it was back when I started doing this.

In fact, resolution, pixels, dots, resizing, all are some of the hardest things for plenty of new users to wrap their head around. We honestly can't expect it to be something non-graphics users understand.

Now, if your client  is a graphics firm or solo designer jobbing out a bit, then that's another story. But if their job is to run a brick and mortar store and they need a website, or a flyer, or a printed brochure, or business cards, we can't expect them to know all the requirements. Unfortunately, they pick up this and that from here and there and think they DO know enough.

Having to save ALL our metadata can be iffy as a solution, as well. A "keep document resolution" checkbox would be one way to get around that. A better help file that explains with the ignorant client in mind is another.  I'm not a web designer and personally I don't care since SFW does let us save all metadata, which is why I continue to use it. But this comes up SO often, doing something to shut us up seems not unreasonable. '-}
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Rick Meikle

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Nice tip about metadata. I suppose preserving it also preserves a color profile that isn't sRGB. (I'm replying without checking first.) On another occasion, Adobe RGB would have been the preferred profile (long story, but it wasn't for web). Anyway, this is what the publisher's Digital Manager said when I questioned the 300dpi spec (relayed by the publisher's rep): "Most people will use artwork that is low quality to create a 72 dpi ad for the web. And Nxtbook will compress the file and then enlarge it to view on the desktop. Depending on the size of the monitor you have, it will enlarge the file and can distort the viewing. So the better the quality of the artwork, the better viewing experience." I have no knowledge of Nxtbook, but it doesn't make any sense. I reached the same conclusion that Johan did. I sent back a long explanation of how dpi was irrelevant and why upscaling is bad, etc., etc., but it was most likely an exercise in futility. In any event, the point of my original post is that Adobe does not explain what Save for Web does to a file with respect to resolution and color profile. The metadata setting didn't even occur to me (though it probably should have). I was looking for specific settings or simply information, which seems pretty reasonable. That's why I made the post, in case others fall into the same trap.