RESOLUTION DROP

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  • Updated 1 month ago
  • Not a Problem
  • (Edited)
Hi guys, I figured that every time when I export/save my retouched photo with LIGHTROOM CC - my resolution drops from 300 to 240.. how can I keep the resolution high after saving?
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KarolinasFairytale

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  • confused

Posted 1 month ago

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PACC PACC

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I assume you're only referring to Export as LR does not have a "Save" option unless you get picky with wording in the Print Module, "save to file option".  

First, the only real values that have any bearing are the pixel dimensions, jpg quality (if jpg), Limit size to, reducing the bit depth, and if using lossy compression on some other file types (I don't recall LR having any lossy compression options).  The "Resolution" is for the most part a meaningless number there for reference.

Why your images are showing a resolution of 240 vs 300 is probably due to having a value of 240 in whatever export preset you're using.  But, if you're not reducing pixel dimensions, limiting the file size, lowering the Quality setting below 100 for JPG, or reducing the bit depth you have not lost any quality. 

BTW, exporting in JPG use a bit depth of 8 bits per channel where RAW files from cameras have 12 to 16 as can DNG, TIFF, and PSD's so selecting Jpg for a file that was not originally a jpg has that inherit data loss.


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KarolinasFairytale

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Thank you very much for your answer.
Here are the passages I do: Usually I export the pictures from the camera in RAW, then I open them in Photoshop, save in TIFF, them I retouch it keeping TIFF file, after working with a picture in LIGHTROOM and saving it, my resolution drops to 240.

Not that 240 is a bad resolution, still good enough for print I hope, but as much as I know Lightroom shouldn’t be dropping it. I will try saving it to file and see what happens.
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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"every time when I export/save my retouched photo with LIGHTROOM CC - my resolution drops from 300 to 240.. how can I keep the resolution high after saving?"

Make sure you've set Resolution: 300 in the Export settings:



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John R. Ellis, Champion

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"The 'Resolution' is for the most part a meaningless number there for reference."

See this discussion for why Resolution is still quite useful: 
ttps://feedback.photoshop.com/photoshop_family/topics/pixels-per-inch-not-possible
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KarolinasFairytale

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It depends for what are you using the photos. When you give them to a magazine for Editorial and Print they need high resolution photos. They wouldn’t accept resolution 72 for example as it happens with JPEG type files.
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Karolina, you seem to be misunderstand resolution slightly. Imagine a pizza... you can cut it into 6 big slices or 12 small slices, but you have the same amount of pizza. That 240 or 300 is the number of slices, but you have the same amount of pixels overall. 
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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And unlike with a real pizza, you can still change a 'digital pizza' sliced into 12 slices in a pizza sliced into 6 slices, making ppi meaningless for anyone who knows how to slice.

BTW, a jpeg is not 72 ppi by definition. It can be any number, just like any other file type can be any number.
(Edited)
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PACC PACC

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"Resolution" is ONLY relevant for printing and even then is not all that relevant.  It's more informational than anything.  The important data are the pixel dimensions, the size of the print you are making and how many  dpi (dots per inch) the printer can print. 

If the printer can print 300 dpi, and your image is 3000 pixels wide, and you want a 10" wide print you have enough pixels to print at 300 dpi no matter what "resolution" you told LR or PS to save the image with.  The only numbers that matter are how many pixels in the image, how many dpi the printer can print and the dimensions of the print being made

On the other hand, with that same image, if you want a 20" print the printer will have to "upscale" the image to 6000 dots of color by inventing a new dot of color in between each image pixel.  Again, no matter what your output "resolution' was set to.  Or, it could print at 150 dpi and not have to upscale, but then each dot of color would take up twice the space (width) on the paper and your quality would go down so printers rarely do this unless you force them to.
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Robert Somrak, Champion

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You should read the LINK posted by John Ellis above to see it is useful in other situations.  For me this is mainly when I take photos to photoshop and want them to come in at the correct size according to my document settings in Photoshop.
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Santhad Suebsart

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Hi 
Adobe Lightroom CC. ( New )   Resolution Default : 240 dpi Edit No.

Adobe Lightroom Classic CC.   Resolution Default : 240dpi  Edit up to