Lightroom: White Borders appear after a reset

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  • Updated 2 years ago
  • (Edited)
I have been using some presets and during this process i have reset the image back to its original settings within lightroom. 

This has caused, in some cases a very thin white line line/border/edge to be created over my image on two sides. Usually top and left edges, sometimes bottom and right edge, never all 4 edges like a frame border. I cant get rid of it unless i crop it out.
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Simon Rutter

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Posted 2 years ago

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Rikk Flohr, Official Rep

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Can you provide more information? Camera Model? OS? Lightroom version?  A screen capture of before and after the operation would also be helpful. 
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Simon Rutter

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Thanks Rikk, i hope the below is sufficient
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Rikk Flohr, Official Rep

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It is. I will consult with the team and see what we can discover.
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Simon Rutter

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Thanks Rikk, but i think, and i use the word think very lightly but it certainly appears so that Joel below has resolved this. So much as in if i turn the GPU accelaration off i cant seem to replicate the glitch so far with my limited testing. However the white border is there in the image and pixels have been overwritten and cant be undone. I will have to crop it out. 

I will let you know if i have any further info on this.

Thank you so much for your speedy response, it is the first time i have used these boards and it has proved invaluable
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Rikk Flohr, Official Rep

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That would be great if it works. Double check that you have downloaded the latest drivers from your video card manufacturers website.

If you are willing to turn it back on and test, let me know how that works out. Does the white border return?
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Simon Rutter

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Hmm i cant get the white border to come back now after i have turned on the GPU acceleration! Which is good but i really dont know why i ended up with the white border on 3 images last night by pressing reset. Confusing
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Simon Rutter

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Hi Rikk thank you for taking the time to reply. 

This was on a D7000 on LR CC 2015. I have used LR for some time but not presets until now.

I cant show you before anymore as it actually a destructive glitch that has happened, i cant even go back through the history. It has happened on several images now. Always the same thickness of border so it must be a fixed amount of pixels wide. 

I have attached an after image of something i didnt mind messing up. You can see a thin white border left and top - not sure you will be able to see it if the image is shown on here on a white background.

EDIT: i have changed the image to show this better
(Edited)
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Joel Weisbrod

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If you exit out of LR and then go back in, is the white border still there??? If not, try turning off the GPU in the performance Tab of the preferences and see if it still happens.
(Edited)
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Simon Rutter

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I cant get the white border to appear again after switching GPU back on. Maybe it wasnt that Joel. Confusing
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Joel Weisbrod

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The problem is that the LR implementation of GPU is sketchy for some reason. On the forum you can find so many issues that are solved after turning off the GPU. I have a super fast computer with the fastest Nvidia Graphics card with 12Gig dedicated graphics RAM on the card and my computer does better with the GPU off. Not sure what is really happening at Adobe but if they don't fix these sisues soon, ON1 Camera RAW will steal lots of their customers when it is finally released....
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Simon Chen, Principal Computer Scientist

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If you zoom to 1:1 and inspect the white border, are they part of the image? The white border could represent some transparent pixels in the image. It could be a result of some image rotation or perspective correction. Go to the crop tool and check the Constrain to Image setting, does the white border goes away? Do you have some custom camera default setup for the camera model. Press Opt/Alt and click on the "Set Default..." button at the bottom right. Restore to Adobe Default Settings to see if it helps.

If it still persist, could you share the image file online somewhere?
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Simon Rutter

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Hi Simon, thank you for the valued input.

Well Simon, Joel - it seems that yes the pixels are indeed transparent and so when i click constrain crop then white band disappears. So my understanding from that is that the image size is ever so slightly smaller than the rest? is that correct? Why would that particular image be smaller than the rest? What could i have done?

I dont knowingly have a custom camera default, i cant find the 'set default...' button you mention or indeed if this is relevant now that i have stated the above points.

These few images that have the white border around are amongst several hundred i imported a few weeks ago. I have been using some presets i purchased but i cant seemingly recreate the fault anymore by using any of these presets so i dont believe it is a glitch in these or even if thats possible anyway.
(Edited)
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Joel Weisbrod

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Still seems like some GPU quirkiness. When you have the border, go to the History panel and go back (down) through the steps to find what created the border. As soon as it disappears, go back forward (up) and see if it reappears. If it does reappear, try changing something in the settings of whatever caused the white border and try again.

Also, if you export the image is the white border there? Use tiff since JPG does not support transparent pixels.