Photoshop Elements: Enhance>Adjust Sharpness causes bands/artifacts (PSE10/Mac)

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  • Updated 6 years ago
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  • (Edited)
PSE 10 on a Mac has a bug when using the Enhance>Adjust Sharpness option. It will create bands of dark and light streaks across sections of a photo when the radius is set to a specific value (changes with the photo) and the Remove Lens Blur option is used. This is not being reported by PC users. The radius usually has to be set at a value between 1 and 1.4 so far from what I can tell to see the problem occur. Other folks on a photoshop related forum are reporting it too for their photos. It is even more noticeable if you desaturate a photo for a b&w. Then you see "white chunky lines" in sections when you run this sharpness filter. I have not checked it if you don't use Remove Lens Blur but make a dif choice.
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Joan Andrew

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Posted 6 years ago

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Brett N, Official Rep

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Are you seeing these streaks/white chunky lines when viewing the image at 100% zoom?
Can you post an image that this has happened to?
Can you post the link to the forum where this is being reported?
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Joan Andrew

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Yes. This is very easy to replicate. Multiple users reported the problem; it was discovered in a photoshop online class. What I did not have time to figure out was if it was only the Mac version of PSE 10. I can find and post the steps for you here as well as post a jpeg after filter is run. We gave the users instructions on how to work around the glitch. The forum is private because it is associated with a class on the Jessica Sprague website but I can ask one of the Administrators if they have a way to give you access as an adobe employee. you would have to register a username with the site first.
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Joan Andrew

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Okay. I just tested on PSE10 Windows and did not have the problem occur. My mac is at Apple currently but I will retest it on the same photo tonight or tomorrow but I was able to pick several photos and get the same problem on the Mac PSE10 version so I do think it is a bug in that version.

1)Make sure default B&W color chips are set
2) Open up any color photo that has a person
3) Dup the photo (Layer 2)
4) working on the dup background layer
Enhance>Adjust Color>Adjust Color for Skin Tones
Click eyedropper on skin adjust color skin sliders to your preference if needed
5) Duplicate this layer (Layer 3)>Set Blend Mode to Soft Light
6) Duplicate Layer 2 again and move it to top of layer stack (Layer4)
Set this to Screen Mode
7) Set Opacity on SL and Screen Layers to 70% (approx) to increase brightness and contrast
8) Add a Hue/Adjust Layer (Layer 5) desaturate by setting Saturation Slider all the way to the left (-100)
9) Go back and adjust Opacity of SL and Screen Layers to increase brightness and contrast to your preference (she used 82%)
10) Go to the Hue/Adjust Layer and click the tool to get to the settings.
Change the Hue to 25 and Sat to 4 to produce a slight sepia look
11) Make a Composite Layer (Layer 6) - Command Opt Shift E while H/S Layer is active - should put Composite on top of Layer Stack
12) To Sharpen:
Enhance>Adj Sharpness
Amount:100%
Remove: Lens Blur
More Refined (check this box)
Settting 1.2 to 1.7 for radius depending on photo

I realize you don't need all the steps to probably reproduce the problem but thought I would give them so you could see what people are doing. It is in Step 12 that the "thick lines of white occur". They may not be visible in the preview area you have in the pop up so you might have to scroll around the photo image to see where they occur. But they did occur on all 4 photos I tested somewhere in the image where a "lighter spot" occured.

Fixes that worked - reducing the radius to 1 (anything over that seemed to bring in the streaks) Others found that if they unchecked the More Refined box the lines would go away.

I took the same photo on both a PC and Mac and found only the Mac version produces these chunky white bands.
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Brett N, Official Rep

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Thanks for the steps. I've been able to reproduce the behavior. I can tell you that happens quite simply as a result of using the More Refined option in combination with the Lens Blur and Radius set above 1.0. Change any of these settings and the behavior goes away.

I'll look more into this and see what's going on.
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Ken

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Leaving aside the problem that Brett was able to reproduce, I read with horror the steps your user did. Here's a fun proposal you can make to stimulate discussion on that site:

There need be only 3 layers -- the background image, a Hue/Saturation layer, and a Levels adjustment layer. Set the Hue to "20" and the Saturation to "10", with the "Colorize" option set. Then adjust the Levels settings to get your desired brightness and contrast.

Simple.

Ken
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Joan Andrew

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oh yes, agreed. There are many ways to achieve a similar look in photoshop. And there are lots of different single lessons that do just this. Part of the process is teaching people about the various options and what they can do...not to say one is easier or quicker than the other or less layers...these are not photographerss "optimizing" their workflow KWIM? These are people "playing" in PS and PSE for the sake of fun and experimentation. The above h/s settings were chosen (my guess as I don't know for sure) because they were demonstrating a slight chocolatey sepia color - aesthetics. In fact, the author does say this is not the optimum way to create b&w's by any means but was illustrating some points to the viewers. You don't get all the verbage in the one two three steps above *wink*
But, yes, you are spot on in terms of a quick and easy way to do a near similar thing.
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Ken

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Sounds good -- I'm all in favor of playing with PSE and having some fun with experiments. A great way to learn!

Ken