Elements 2019: HEIF/HEVC - Not supported in Windows? Someday?

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 2 weeks ago
  • (Edited)
So it's my understanding that PSE 2019 doesn't support HEIF/HEVC in Windows.  Wow!  That's actually kind of shocking.

I would like to move my jpg images over to these new formats but wouldn't be able to edit them at all with PSE or PRE.

Seems like a gross oversight, since Windows itself does support these formats through recently released Microsoft codecs.

Any potential timeline for PSE to support these formats (before 2020)?
Photo of Springs System

Springs System

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 2 weeks ago

  • 1
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 664 Posts
  • 79 Reply Likes
Hello Springs System:   

Adobe Premier has HEIF as a container for MPEG codecs as storage for MPEG compressed files.   HEVC is the standard that specifies storage for intra coded images.  These two formats were only containers of MPEG in various formats, and may no longer be needed in certain circumstances. 

Also, there are no release dates for Premier 2019 and with our strict non-disclosure agreeement in forums and among employees, there cannot be a release date given.   Although there was a rumor about an October 13-17 release for a CC program from Adobe, that may not pertain to Elements, and whether it would be with or without Premier.  

Steve Lehman, mcse



Photo of Michel BRETECHER

Michel BRETECHER, Champion

  • 1108 Posts
  • 230 Reply Likes
https://forums.adobe.com/thread/2543008
There is support for Importing and editing those formats in PSE and PE2019 for Mac users.
https://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop-elements/features.html

Anyway, saving jpegs to HEIC has only drawbacks and no advantage.
How many Windows users do you think are interested now?


Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 664 Posts
  • 79 Reply Likes
Hi there Michel, 

HEIC, HEVC are in Adobe, whether found or not.  These are containers for MPEG,  used for portability of an MPEG file format used for display and websites.   HEIC and HEVC have a place in my list of file formats ('video formats').   In Adobe products, they may still exist there later for convenience, but there are other video formats.   

You mentioned JPG, it's used in image editing.  Thanks for the feedback.  Good research.   You are great at referencing.   



Photo of Springs System

Springs System

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
What about HEIC?  It's the format used by Apple iPhones.  Still seems like PSE should be able to edit and save still images produced by the iPhone.
Photo of Michel BRETECHER

Michel BRETECHER, Champion

  • 1110 Posts
  • 232 Reply Likes
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 664 Posts
  • 79 Reply Likes
Michel, you did it again.  Good link!  I'm a Windows engineer - I know formats but not iOS and iphone.  I have Android. I'm out.   
Photo of Michel BRETECHER

Michel BRETECHER, Champion

  • 1110 Posts
  • 232 Reply Likes
It's a bit strange that the tech doc has been issued just after the launch, before users have time to check the feature. 
Do you remember the fuss about the jpeg 2000 format? Much smarter than jpeg, but it did not succeed. 
Maybe the new 'advanced' format will do it now that Apple offers that option in their new phones.   As far as I know, no camera offers the format.  As an engineer, you'll certainly will find discussions about it, it's a very smart technical achievement which is a real challenge for software editors if they want to go farther than simple conversion to tiff or existing formats.
You'll also find a  number of posts about it in the present forum.
While it's obvious that a number Apple users will want to show that they are ahead of everybody with novelties, most users, not only Win ones, will wait before making the plunge.
- Similar competiting new formats might be available
- HEIF is mainly seen as good in quality and compression, but raw is superior in quality and compression is less a problem today.
- Sharing: if I had friends wanting to send me HEIF, I would require them to send jpegs or to host raws or tiffs on the Web.
- Archiving:  Will the format stay long enough? Remember the organizer did drop the jpeg 2000 format support very soon.
- Converting a jpeg library to HEIF? No quality advantage, very slightly more compression and risks for the future?




Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 664 Posts
  • 79 Reply Likes
This is an interesting situation:   The iPhone makers adopted this format container only because it was available, not really used anymore.  It's considered by engineers as being old and stupid.  So Apple used it in their phones.  But remember it's only a container-format for other formats, originally utilized for JPG compression to compress more than the 80% and this was only to save disc space.  The JPEG-2000 was a 90% compression.   It didn't serve a purpose on the social sites because they couldn't model a picture for their site big enough without blurring pixel problems.  They dumped it, and then wrote strict guidelines for their pictures, hard to follow and they ended up copying the old passport photo guidelines but making the photo even smaller.   For the passport photo problem, Canada was really angry because their passport photo guide is much different than ours, and their social sites for Canada had a different guide for photos.  (they needed to show the shoulders to the elbows, but the USA doesn't need that)   Apple only took the HEIF/HEVC containers because it was available.  I don't think its iPhone users will brag about it being a new thing for them, as they will have more problems with it, not being a real pro and knowing how to use it.  Instead of JPG, Apple will utilize it as a RAW format container and a transport container to Photoshop to enlarge a photo or to remove it from the container and make it into a RAW format.  (in iPhone it'll be the "high quality photo" setting, in cameras it'll be the camera maker's RAW format).   Also remember that iPhone and camera makers always want another way to compress RAW to save space, and users of iPhone's are begging for RAW or uncompressed photos to share with Photoshop.  Now also remember that RAW from a camera or phone is always compressed in 16 bit files to save space.   Container formats are indeed needed for that, but the iPhone maker need to make those files 8 bit file in the container format, for what they will need for Photoshop.  The iPhone users will need to convert their RAW 16 bit files to 8 bit in order to print.  Printers will always reject a 16 bit file and in Photoshop it will send an error message about it, and then a converter behind that, asking if they want to convert their 16 bit file to 8 bit before it prints.  First, this is the print driver throwing the error message.  Second, Photoshop is sending the converter.   So iPhone users will need to become pro's to use this method.    Otherwise, we will get lots of people asking for a "how-to".   I guess we need to write one.   After this learning stage, I can't see how any of them will brag about their 'new' container format.  

Steve Lehman, mcse



Photo of Springs System

Springs System

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thank you all for the thoughtful replies.  As a technical novice, there's  a lot to chew on here.  Looks like I'll be sticking with jpg & raw for the foreseeable future.
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 664 Posts
  • 79 Reply Likes
Postscript:  

I don't usually teach technology but I know Michel could use this info, and Springs System, you might find this informative.  I have some definitions you may need to read about.   

HEIF (High Efficiency Image File) compressed image container standardized by MPEG ISO media files.   

HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding) intra-coded media specifically stored in HEIF container formats.   It's the new successor to Advanced Video Coding (AVC,or "H.264") one compression scheme used by Blu-ray.   

Better yet for Michel:  

BPG (Better Portable Graphics) a new format replaces JPEG format when quality or file size is an issue.   Its main advantages are a higher compression ratio. Files are much smaller than JPEG for similar quality.   

These are in my list of file formats at our company site.  http://pixsavers.com/photoformats.html