Photoshop: Support scalable user interface UI for high resolution monitors

  • 127
  • Idea
  • Updated 2 months ago
  • Implemented
  • (Edited)
I'm using a high resolution monitor(2560x1600). As a result, all the the toolbar fonts and menu fonts are small and hard to see. I do not want to lower the screen resolution as this would defeat the purpose of this monitor.. Will the new CS6 have the ability to increase font sizes to accommidate Hi-Res monitors?

Thanks

Ron Acevedo
Photo of RONALD ACEVEDO

RONALD ACEVEDO

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 8 years ago

  • 127
Photo of Bill Fishburne

Bill Fishburne

  • 2 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
I'm in shock that I bought CS6 and can't read the UI. I called Adobe multiple times and got nowhere. I'm very proud of my new 27" Dell All-In-One system with 2560x1440 totally useless pixels of resolution. But I can't use anywhere near that and still see the tools and menus. And this has been going of since 2006? Can I get my money back? Where the heck are my old PageMaker CDs? It would be nice if someone at Adobe cared enough to respond.
Photo of Bruce Bidinoff

Bruce Bidinoff

  • 9 Posts
  • 10 Reply Likes
Actually, I'm surprised that Adobe has not addressed this, even with just a comment. My guess is that they are not concerned with individuals who are in the "senior" category, or those with less than excellent vision. We must be a very small part of their user base.
Photo of Richard Greentree

Richard Greentree

  • 5 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
I am new to Photoshop Elements. Unfortunately, I am also very nearsighted and unable to easily see the tiny icons and text. Is there a way to make the images larger? Many thanks.,

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Too Small to See.
Photo of Jonas M. Rogne

Jonas M. Rogne

  • 83 Posts
  • 11 Reply Likes
With current monitors that have around 100 ppi the current interface is not a problem (for people with normal vision).

However; on the next generation monitors (like Apple's "retina") starting to push almost 300 ppi Adobe must be prepared to make adjustments.

The interface will have to be truly scaleable, or (probably easier/better) have preset sizes to choose from (double and triple the current size).
Photo of Vitosha

Vitosha

  • 2 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
It is already a huge problem.

Photoshop is a costly design program for professionals, meaning that most of it's users already have high resolution monitors now. I do not require any glasse and my vision is perfect, but after even 2 hours on Photoshop my eyes are starting to hurt.
Photo of Jonas M. Rogne

Jonas M. Rogne

  • 83 Posts
  • 11 Reply Likes
I'm not convinced by your argument, but by the time CS7 comes it will be noticeable. Monitors above 200 ppi will become more common. Hopefully Adobe will put some effort into this.

-- A bit off-topic addressing your eyes:

To make sure we mean the same by "resolution". What is the actual ppi of your monitor? (number of pixels across / width of monitor in inches).

A typical 1920x1200 24" monitor is ~94 ppi.
Apple's 27" Thunderbolt display (2560x1440) is 109 ppi.
Professionals won't have much higher resolution than that on their main monitor (and I assume they don't work off a laptop screen).

Unless your monitor has a significantly higher ppi than this (like the Macbook Pro with retina display - 220 ppi) then the resolution should not be the cause of your pain. There are many other factors that contribute to eye strain.

Good lighting is essential (and NO sunlight), as well as a monitor brightness (and temperature) to match your surroundings (if you monitor brightness is maxed, something is not right). I believe overly bright monitors is a common issue.

Another question is viewing distance and how much you concentrate on the monitor. Look off into the distance now and then to let your eye muscles relax. - And check your eyesight to really make sure that glasses won't help.
Not blinking enough is also a known problem when working on a monitor. Eyes get dry - and start to hurt. Remember to blink and take breaks.

(I've had my share of eye pains...)
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
The Adobe UI is way too small for today’s graphics workstation monitors and it is not scalable to meet users' needs as well. There is no defense for not fixing the problem except for more weasel words.
Photo of Joe Lampone

Joe Lampone

  • 7 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
I am quite tired of hearing arguments that support the ignored scaling issue. I have a Dell 27" HD monitor AND a cintiq 24 HD, the software loads a large scalable interface that is STILL TOO SMALL TO WORK WITH!!!!!! HELLO!!!!
Photo of Bruce Bidinoff

Bruce Bidinoff

  • 9 Posts
  • 10 Reply Likes
C'mon, Adobe. These responses are more than just a few disillusioned Photoshop users. With all those unique algorithms you design, surely you can give us a menu we can read. Please.
Photo of Joe Lampone

Joe Lampone

  • 7 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
I am quite tired of hearing arguments that support the ignored scaling issue. I have a Dell 27" HD monitor AND a cintiq 24 HD, the software loads a large scalable interface that is STILL TOO SMALL TO WORK WITH!!!!!! HELLO!!!! I cant sit here and believe any excuses why it should be ok to use when a current version of Photoshop Elements has a large enough scalable interface, I tried it, it looked great on my Dell 27 inch HD , so WHY NOT DO THAT ON CS6 PHOTOSHOP EXTENDED etc., etc.,.....I'm sorry, but whatever the code, instructions, or data needed for a professional app needs, you mean you cant look at Elements and comp that in the build for CS6? Its totally possible, they know it. Now they should work on an update that works for our type of HD monitors that have a 2560 x 1440 display whether its a 94, 109, or 220ppi resolutions. There are different contexts which decsribe resolution and we need to adhere to all of them or at least the pixel count in heighth and width and then ppi...
Check out the image below, just to give you an idea of scale, I took a picture w my iPhone of my Cintiq 24 HD and my hand right up on the screen. Doesnt it look like the tool bar icons are too damn small,..it would be nice to set them as large as the panel options are as large in the Layers panel, for example...

So, to sum up the most important facts, if Elements can do it on my 27 inch Dell why not Photoshop CS6, if the panels have options to increase their size, why cant the tool bar icons or the menus.

Adobe, please heare me, I truly rely on this app and its paint tools and I dont want to spend time learning others.

Thank you.

Photo of Jonas M. Rogne

Jonas M. Rogne

  • 83 Posts
  • 11 Reply Likes
I think we all agree here. Adobe should consider people with poor eyesight - as well as the new generation of high ppi monitors. OS X Lion and Windows 7 have already taken steps in this direction; now the individual programs should follow.

The creative suite has about 20 programs in it, and it's probably no small task to make all the interfaces scale well. That being said they should have enough time to get this done before CS7 (by then it will probably become a big issue).
I don't expect us to hear anything else from Adobe until then (~1-2 years).

---

The monitors you mention (27" @ 2560x1440 = 109 ppi) are quite normal today. Judging by the hand you hold up as well, this looks perfectly normal (not only for Photoshop but for all programs). If you can't read the menus in Photoshop on this monitor you will also have trouble in most other programs as well as on websites (unless you enlarge them). The UI font size in Photoshop is actually the same as text on this website. This is not something to yell about.

So, today's UI on your current monitor should not be a problem (assuming you don't use VGA). If it is hard to read you are sitting too far from the monitor (or you have poor eyesight).

Ps: PPI of the monitor and view distance is what matters here. Monitor size in cm and pixels is just useful for calculating the resulting ppi.
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
This Adobe UI Issue remains unaddressed after twelve months since first identified here; and in the meantime, a new issue of software has been released with the same problem as well. Ostridge Adobe still has its head in the sand and continues to claim that the sun is not shining while the beach gets hotter and hotter.
Photo of Jonas M. Rogne

Jonas M. Rogne

  • 83 Posts
  • 11 Reply Likes
Since it says "under consideration", and the only Adobe reply is that they can't comment on specifics regards to future versions. We will just have to hope that this means that they are working on it.
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
It is not a new version issue; it is basic functionality issue that should have been addressed by a bug-fix, a long time ago! No, we don't have to "hope" for anything! Our option is to deal with the learning curve and move on to other software. If you guys and gals explored this option, you would discover that Adobe has done you a favor by not supporting its products in an appropriate and timely fashion. Earlier I posted some of these alternatives here. They were, off course, immediately redacted.
Photo of Bruce Bidinoff

Bruce Bidinoff

  • 9 Posts
  • 10 Reply Likes
I'd like to see Adobe provide a free fix of some kind, but don't expect that will happen.
In any case I still like the software very much, especially the new ACR.
Photo of Robert Fenichel

Robert Fenichel

  • 4 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
The fixed-size icons of the tool panel do not make good use of the space available on large, modern screens. On my screen, the column of icons extends only halfway down. More flexibility here might allow either (a) larger icons for easier visibility (my first choice), or (b) more icons, so that functions whose icon-sharing is not obvious (e.g., Eyedropper & Notes) would be separate.

More radically, the tool panel might be user-configurable, like the tool bars of MS Office.

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
icons in tool panel.
Photo of Jeff Hopkins

Jeff Hopkins

  • 1 Post
  • 2 Reply Likes
Kinda funny but Photoshop is supposed to be the Ultimate in Photo and Graphic manipulation but something as basic as changing it's own Font size is made impossible Go figure I wanted to purchase CS6 but it is un unusable in the current state LARGER TOOLS Duh Corel here I come
Photo of Gina

Gina

  • 7 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
I came to the forum to find out how to make the icons, text, and nodes bigger in CS6, and stumbled upon this thread. I bought a new higher end laptop, the screen is 17.3 with a 1920x1080 rez and I almost have my face on the screen trying to see everything. The nodes in Illustrator are microscopic, and the menu type is fixed size so that no matter what I set my text to be in windows (right now at 125%), nothing in CS6 pays any attention. I do not wear glasses, and though my near sight is a little foggy at 45, I see pretty well. I don't have a problem with any other software so far. Adobe, you need to address this.

I honestly can't for the life of me figure out why the laptop industry thinks we have to have HD on such small screens, but that is the case. There is only one manufacturer who has 17.3 at 1600x900, and I figure that will go away as well, because the tech industry pokes fun at them. (As if they know what we all want)
But I digress.

I paid hundreds (thousands) of dollars for software that gives me a migraine. Please Adobe, let us size the interface larger or smaller for what is comfortable. Even your website has text that is waaaaaaay to small on my monitor. Apparently, your fixed type size also does not care what I set my computer for. :( I think this is bad form.
Photo of Jim Holder

Jim Holder

  • 2 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
I've been an elements user for years. I finally saved enough to buy its big brother and now I can't read it. Same goes for Lightroom. By the looks of this forum there's no solution forthcoming. Guess I'll have to move to two screens (hi res and lo res) or maybe decamp to Corel. Hey, Adobe, the grey market's growing and you'll be missing out.
Photo of Chris Cox

Chris Cox

  • 20280 Posts
  • 842 Reply Likes
Notice the part at the top that says "under consideration"?
And did you miss the announcements of Retina display support?
Photo of Jim Holder

Jim Holder

  • 2 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
Notice the part at the top that says "under consideration"?

I did. Unfortunately this offers me no comfort

.And did you miss the announcements of Retina display support?

I did. But it's my retina that needs support.

Thanks for the interest though.
Photo of Pink Tree Studio

Pink Tree Studio

  • 6 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
I'm soooo behind the times! I just purchased Photoshop CS6 a few weeks ago, but I discovered this thread because I'm trying to find out if there is a way to increase the size of the UI in general and the Rulers in particular.

Like others, my vision isn't what it used to be, but the CS6 UI is really tiny!!! I need this fixed in this version, because I'm getting old and it's the last version I will be able to buy, unless I win the lottery :~)
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
Love is Blind. One of your options is to migrate to free or less expensive software; and instead, your pocketbook will be loving it while you deal with a learning curve you can see.
Photo of Pink Tree Studio

Pink Tree Studio

  • 6 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
Ha ha ha, William :~) And according to Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber, Love Never Dies, so there :~)

It's little too late now for me to "migrate" to other software, as I've been using Photoshop, Illustrator and PageMaker/InDesign since the early 1990s, so the only "learning curve" for me is the UI :~) I do this for fun anyway, not for profit~~it's just avery expensive hobby :~) But thank you for your concern and your suggestions!
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
According to Sarah Brightman, it moves on. Adobe is counting on your reluctance to do the same.
Photo of Pink Tree Studio

Pink Tree Studio

  • 6 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
Oh, you are quite a card, William :~) Why would Adobe count on my (or anyone else's for that matter) reluctance to move on? No offense, but that makes no sense :~/ It has nothing to do with reluctance, at least for me.
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
Huh? Card or not, if Adobe was losing product sales (market share) and receiving lots of product returns (Increased Cost of Sales), as their customer base "moved on", they would have fixed the subject problem a long time ago. It’s a "walk the walk" vs. “talk the talk" state of “love” affairs.
Photo of INGRID JONGMANS

INGRID JONGMANS

  • 1 Post
  • 3 Reply Likes
I'm one of those 'aging' designers Adobe expects to change their careers, if they can't read the CS-n menu's anymore. A year ago I had a new high-res 24 inch monitor. Sent it back because I could not find any way to adjust fontsize and user interface in my CS4. Now I'm still working on my old CRT screen hoping for better days.
I want to have a CHOICE.
I want to adjust my workspace the way I like. Even my chair has more options than Adobe' s "Creative" Suite.
I want to choose menucolors, fontsizes, screensizes, resolutions, dotpitches, aspect ratio's etc. etc.
I don't play games or watch DVD's on my monitor screen. I design books and websites and that is my JOB.
I want to work for at least 8 hours a day with all the CS software without getting headaches and eyestrain.
Machines and software are supposed to serve ME, not the other way around.

Time to check out alternatives. If there are any.
Photo of Beverly Stout

Beverly Stout

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
I agree. I can't see the small type in Photoshop and there is no way to adjust it. Adobe needs to respect their customers more and make this correction.
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
Hi IJ,
Here is one of many sources for what you are looking for:

http://www.maclife.com/article/featur...

Regards, WHG
Photo of kql smithson

kql smithson

  • 2 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
I am in my 50's my eyesight is not improving, for the sake of us dinosaurs, maybe your product might install a visual font size preference in the future. Thank you for the trial offer but quite honestly it's given me a headache!

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Eyesight isn't getting any better; Dinosaurs complain!.
Photo of LEE SAXON

LEE SAXON

  • 30 Posts
  • 9 Reply Likes
"Retina" is not the only high resolution screen.

Some may have better eyesight, but for me Photoshop's interface is barely legible on a 30" 2560x1600. Why not use the high resolution assets developed for "Retina" to offer me larger GUI?

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Make "HiDPI" not exlusive to "Retina".
Photo of Jonas M. Rogne

Jonas M. Rogne

  • 83 Posts
  • 11 Reply Likes
"Retina" is not the only high resolution display, but your 30" 2560x1600 is still only 100.6 ppi - and that is pretty normal.
But as this thread shows that far from all users have perfect vision, and displays will only keep getting higher resolution.
Photo of Paloma Farmer

Paloma Farmer

  • 2 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Hello,

I'm a fairly young person with pretty good vision. I have astigmatism which only effects my vision of objects very far away. I'm in a creative field and use photoshop and illustrator every day. Your software isn't just important to me, its how I feed and clothe myself.

I've got a nice big shiny iMac with a native screen size of 2560 x 1440, which makes working on my artwork so much better. However, I can't make out the UI of Illustrator and Photoshop without staining or staying closer to my monitor then I'd like to be. The icons are so teeny tiny! The tools themselves end up about a quarter inch on one side, and most buttons smaller then that.

I do get around well enough simply by memory and what I can make out. Anchor points, however, are a nightmare. I've used preferences to make them as large as possible and even then, they can be difficult to select.

I appreciate a neat organized screen as much as the next person, but if someone with average vision like me can't make things out easily, it must be awful for those worse off. I'm sure it will take a lot of work, but please consider making more UI size options. Until then I'll do my best to take care of my eyes!

Thank you,
Paloma
Photo of Chris Cox

Chris Cox

  • 20280 Posts
  • 842 Reply Likes
A quarter inch icon should be visible assuming you have proper corrective lenses. The display you are referring to is still about 100 dpi -- aka "normal" resolution. And we already released some scalable UI for Macintosh with the 13.0.2/13.1 release.

The remaining problems are for people with really bad vision, and scalable UI on Windows -- that's why this topic is still marked "under consideration" instead of "implemented".

You should also note that the Photoshop engineers are mostly in their 40s with corrective lenses, reading glasses, bifocals, etc. And we use Photoshop daily on normal and high resolution displays.
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
Yet another non-answer, answer. The icons are too small when they are displayed on high resolution monitors, which for professinals is the norm. Do you realy think that we are going to spend a lot of money on software and then display the UI on a cheap, low/medium resolution monitor?
Photo of Chris Cox

Chris Cox

  • 20280 Posts
  • 842 Reply Likes
What does that have to do with Paloma's post or my response?
It really sounds like you are confusing large displays (like Paloma's iMac) with high resolution displays (like the retina displays).
And why do you seem to think that we aren't addressing this when we've already said (and SHOWN) that we are?
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
What release? CS6.? or CS7.? Or when?
Photo of Paloma Farmer

Paloma Farmer

  • 2 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Hello Chris Cox,

I see now that I've failed to properly update!! I'm doing so right now. My apologies for my original comment, I obviously didn't read and research my issue throughly enough. Thanks very much for the reminder in your post.

As far as the quarter inch icons are concerned, I'm probably much too far from my monitor at times. With eyes ~20 inches from the screen I can still make them out, indeed. I'm excited to have the option to adjust the UI for those times when I'm further from my monitor due to not currently having proper office furniture.

Please know that I had no intent to offend or frustrate, especially with my opening remark. I should have chosen my words more carefully and read about the issue more throughly before contributing to the conversation. I'm sorry.

Thanks so much.
-Paloma
Photo of LEE SAXON

LEE SAXON

  • 30 Posts
  • 9 Reply Likes
A lot of the responses, including from Adobe people, have centered around the fact that a 30" 2560x1600 is, at 100 DPI, not a high-density screen like the Retina.

This is true, and if I had a 100 DPI 15-17" laptop I would likely not be having problems.

You're overlooking that one must sit quite a bit farther away from a 30" screen to see everything without turning one's head. Additionally, for me at least, sitting too close causes headaches. I like to be at least the monitor's diagonal away from it (30" from a 30" screen, for example).
Photo of William Geiger

William Geiger

  • 26 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
The word for the concept at issue here is ergonomics. Customers should be able to scale UI size to suit their comfort level, whether due to a physical impairment or not. When we buy professional software to use on professional hardware, we expect both to be ergonomic. Why? Because we spend up to eight or more hours a day using them.
Photo of Martin Dawson

Martin Dawson

  • 5 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes
Having just spent a huge amount of money on Adobe Suite CS6 and also upgraded to a Retina Mac I find it hard to believe Adobe can be so small minded as to ignore what is a blatant case of serious human rights infringement.

Millions of graphics and web professionals are being forced to compromise their visual health by squinting at tiny UI text far too small for the extended hours that we have to endure.

Adobe has a MONOPOLY on industry standard software and as such should be forced to offer a usable version which is not detrimental to the health of millions of professionals.

Where is the printers union when you need it?

Has anyone seen a single response from Adobe?

THIS SITUATION NEEDS AN OFFICIAL COMPLAINT ON THE BASIS OF HUMAN RIGHTS INFRINGEMENT.
Photo of Axiom

Axiom

  • 111 Posts
  • 9 Reply Likes
^ lol

well that escalated quickly

I run three monitors, and soon, I'll be swapping out the middle for a 30". I'm not looking forward to needing binoculars.

if we didn't need to enlarge things, one wonders why they even bother wasting UI space with zoom. Or you know, simply use the existing windows UI sizing options, as why reinvent the wheel?
Photo of Herman Venable

Herman Venable

  • 2 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
Unlike the twenty something year old engineers at Adobe, my eyes are not as good as they were - along with most everything in or on my body. I simply cant read those itsy fonts or icons without getting a headache please tell me how to jack the icon an font size up.

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
How the heck can I increase the size of the teenyweeny font and icons?.
Photo of Jonas M. Rogne

Jonas M. Rogne

  • 83 Posts
  • 11 Reply Likes
In CS6 go to Preferences > Interface, and change the "UI Font Size" at the bottom to "Large". That's all you can do until a newer version comes out.

Optionally try to use a monitor with lower ppi (width in pixels / width in inches = ppi), or sit closer to it.
Photo of Axiom

Axiom

  • 111 Posts
  • 9 Reply Likes
yes, this is partially possible in Photoshop, and you can also change the font size in windows to affect menu items - but the icons, and other UI buttons do not enlarge.
In Illustrator for instance none of this is possible - and worse, when you zoom - in the hopes of having larger anchor handles, they scale to remain at their set tiny size...
"try to use a smaller monitor or sit closer" is not the correct solution.
Photo of Jonas M. Rogne

Jonas M. Rogne

  • 83 Posts
  • 11 Reply Likes
"try to use a smaller monitor or sit closer".
I did not mean smaller monitor, just lower ppi. That could be the same pixel count you already have (like 1920x1080), but on a larger monitor. That IS a one working solution (or at least work-around) to the problem "it's too small for me to see". I was providing options for Herman that can be used right now, while waiting for a future version of the CS.

It's not the best solution in many cases (especially since we want higher ppi monitors), but it's the only one available right now besides the "UI Font Size" option in CS6.

Ps: Regarding anchor size in Illustrator CS6; you can make them slightly larger/easier to see under Preferences > Selection & anchor display (choose the rightmost option).

If your eyesight is bad, see an optician to make sure you use optimal glasses/lenses. This can make a big difference as well.
There are other things to consider as well to avoid headaches and strain when working on a computer monitor (like screen brightness and white balance).
Photo of Axiom

Axiom

  • 111 Posts
  • 9 Reply Likes
I knew what you meant about the monitor. I meant smaller.
Lowering my resolution to 1024x768 is not a solution, it's smaller (less screen space) and very grainy because it's not a native resolution you see.
Using a 30" monitor with a native 1920x1080 resolution at 3ft away also would be grainy and uncomfortable.
Using a smaller native monitor like a 15 or 17" at 1024x768 would be a solution, but I'd have less "real estate" to work in again, and it would make my images too small to see the finer details i need to change "as a whole" without a lot of zoom-in-and-out-ed-ness

So, it would be easier for everyone involved to have an option to enlarge the UI elements.

I'm pretty sure we all know how to use our monitors and eyes.
I also don't know why "see a doctor" is the popular retort to people wanting larger UI elements.

Actually, for all the naysayers, why is it never the developer's issue? Are all UI's perfect out of the box? No.
That's why we're saying - Hey, this could be tweaked a bit please.

Thanks for the Illustrator tip.
Whats interesting is that I knew it was there - but never noticed what the difference was in the choices - until I really looked just now at your suggestion.
Then while laughing, I used the snipping tool and fired up photoshop.

Using my 20/20 vision (pretty good considering I'm 41) and zoom on photoshop and have to say that the 4 pixel handle on "small" compared to the 7 pixel handle on "large" is a wonderful improvement - at 600%.
You can barely notice a difference - and these remain at that size regardless of how large you magnify your paths. Instead of slightly enlarging as you go.

I'm not even going to bother going into the fishing you have to do to get the type on a path handles to appear.

First thing in the morning it's fine once the coffee kicks in, but by lunch, man my eyes hurt. Because the icons and stuff are too small.

Our design projects are only getting larger, so we need large monitors, so we should also be able to have a large UI option.
Photo of Jonas M. Rogne

Jonas M. Rogne

  • 83 Posts
  • 11 Reply Likes
Let's just stick to "ppi" when comparing monitors, shall we? Makes it easier. :)
And yes, always use the native resolution or it will be "blurry" due to the upsampled image not matching the pixel grid.

We all know it would be a good thing to have an option to scale the UI to larger sizes. It's an necessity when we get higher ppi monitors, or bad eyesight. Done. Settled. Adobe knows as well, but it's unrealistic to expect it in a CS6 update.

Now, that being said, if you have 20/20 vision with no defects, then a 100 ppi monitor will allow you to see all the buttons and text perfectly well in the current UI (It's the same size as the text on this webpage and most other software I use). I have 20/20 vision, and can work comfortably in Photoshop all day on 100 ppi monitors - that's why I'm pointing out that there are other variables at play.

It sounds like your problem is your eyes getting tired over time, and at the end of the day it gets uncomfortable. From experience there are several things that can contribute to this, and I recommend you try them out since it's important when you work in front of a monitor all day:

1. Most imporantly; calibrate your monitor! It's very important that you pick a brightness and color temperature that matches your surroundings. Monitors are often way too bright, and too cool. Try a warmer temperature (warmer than you think), and lower lum (lower than you think!). The change will look "bad" immediately when you change it (as your eyes are adapted to the old setting), but after a short while your eyes/brain will adapt. Try working for an hour at least.
2. Look away and off into the distance now and then. This relaxes your eye muscles (the closer something is, the harder they work to converge your eyes).
3. Remember to blink to avoid your eyes becoming dry (you blink less when looking at a monitor). Regular short breaks (coffee, smokes, toilet, whatever) can help with point 2-3.
4. Get your eyes checked - just in case - if it happens a lot. They sometimes do this for free where they sell glasses. Takes about one minute. Your eyes being slightly "off" might get tiring over time (and we all get older...).
Photo of Axiom

Axiom

  • 111 Posts
  • 9 Reply Likes
Jonas... c'mon now, i'm not trying to pick a fight,
but lines per inch are not the issue here really.
Our UI is set for 72/96 dpi. If you want lines per inch stick with typesetting, paper and postscript printers - there is no monitor on the planet dealing with lpi

So we're dealing with pixels here.
A 7 pixel image (such as the illustrator handles) is variable in RENDERING size base on pixel density of the MONITOR. If I have a 300 dpi retina display that means my "7 pixel" non scalable image is really friggin small.

What I'm - and others are trying to say is that if an icon is meant to be seen at 1/4 inch large of actual ruler held to screen (or close to it) - it should be a 1/4 inch on any monitor --- which would indicated the UI should talk to the OS/drivers to determine the resolution of the monitor and display - and via an algorithm render an approximated 1/4 inch image.

Current, it simply is based on dpi as a raw thing - so it shrinks or enlarges based solely on the monitor's resolution. And we know how lightroom and photoshop and so on complain about having a 1024 or approximate monitor as in these sizes our modules take up like half the screen real estate lol

That said, 1/4 is too small for extended view, all of us regardless of age and eyesight are going to experience strain looking at such small icons all the time day in day out - it's like carpel tunnel for the eye balls.

So aside from putting the ball in our courts, Adobe should simply meet us half way - as we already upgrade our gear, buy ram, increase drive space, blah blah blah - and make the UI scalable.

Please...
Photo of Jennifer Lansdale

Jennifer Lansdale

  • 6 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Jonas, advice kindly meant and already acted on- including a yoga mat nearby.
My eye doctor said "get a different program", but the availability of on line tutorials and the range of inter-related programs like AE and Illustrator kind of precludes that. We're dealing with the schoolyard bully- it's his ball (even if we love the game) and he knows it.
Photo of LEE SAXON

LEE SAXON

  • 30 Posts
  • 9 Reply Likes
I'm glad this topic is still getting comments. We need to keep reminding Adobe that this should be one of their highest priorities.

Can anyone explain to me why this is even a big deal? It seems to me the assets necessary for a larger interface have ALREADY BEEN DEVELOPED for Retina and all Adobe has to do is give the rest of us access to them.