Elements: Problem parsing JPEG data

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Please help everytime I try to open a photo in Photoshop elements it gives me the error code "could not complete your request because of a problem parsing JPEG data. Then when I try to save it in paint it tells me there is a problem with my RAM! How do I fix this? I really need to work on these photos.
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Carlie Michelle Hyde

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Posted 2 months ago

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Michel BRETECHER, Champion

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See the explanation and step by step solution of this bug created by Microsoft with the lastest Windows 10 (1803) update:

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop-elements/kb/integer-50-8-required-closest-value-inserted-photoshop...

Also, from the hundreds of complaints in the Elements user to user forum:
https://forums.adobe.com/thread/2423579

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Steve Lehman

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Michel, glad you sent this link to Carle.   That's one possible solution.   

As an engineer, my first thought is, if there is an error message concerning RAM then the hardware is the problem.  Check the computer.  Sounds like the RAM memory modules can be ajar. 

That exact thing was a favorite thing our University Prof would do to each of us when we came into class each day to test us.  RAM memory that's slightly not connected.  Just rap on the box and a screw comes loose.  We can see the memory loss in the boot-up sequence. 

Also I had the old trick of switching cables between one device and another and it's easy to switch back but we were supposed to readdress the ports instead.   The University in Seattle was teaching engineering and they were tough.   


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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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The parsing JPG data error is due to not enough memory for the process to complete, and that is due to PS not thinking their is enough due to Win10 reporting free memory differently and PS not accounting for it.  It is not due to a chip being loose which would likely cause a blue-screen.
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Michel BRETECHER, Champion

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Steve (Lehman),

If you have some time, please have a look at the discussion I have linked to in the Elements forum (there are similar ones for Photoshop). It's a non uncommon situation where the text of the message error is not directly related to the cause of the bug. Many different error messages due to the same bug in Windows 10 (1803).

It's the first time I do see so many discussions and posts, which means thousands of users have been hit.  The problem disappears if one can roll back to the previous Win version...
It's also the first time the same workaround works for so many people.

Steve (Sprengel),

While there is no doubt that the 1803 Win update did create the issue, I have still three questions.

1 - Why don't some people (including me) have no problem with the (1803) update? A random coincidence between the RAM evaluation by Windows and PSE?

2 - It appears that the registry workaround also solves serious slowness behaviours for systems with a lot of RAM, and that, well before the 1803 update?

3- It seems that the RAM value you enter in decimal works even if it is not the exact real physical RAM!
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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A1/2. I have seen people with the error back in December, while 1803 came out in early April, but I don't know if those people were perhaps running a preview version of 1803, or maybe the issue is from earlier, and it just affected some people later. I didn't see the error until 1803. I also am not sure what is different in the OS that is causing Adobe problems. The registry key works for very old versions of Adobe products, so it can't be just something they added to the most recent versions, so it's either an OS thing or part of the SDK they've been developing with for a while, or it may be a coincidence where somehow their registry key has existed, it's usage hidden, used only for testing purposes, but now it's useful for real-world situations as well. I don't know.

A3. If the problem is that the multiplier for free memory or total memory has changed and Adobe interprets memory 1024-times-less than before, just having a reasonable number should work as long as it's slightly less than the actual memory, right? I mean if you have 8192MB of RAM and you enter 8000 in the registry override and PS is configured to use less than 100% of the memory then the only side-effect is there'll be 192MB more free memory than what PS would have used if the actual value of 8192MB was used instead of 8000MB. Now if you enter 8000 when you only have 4096MB of RAM then I could see things going haywire of you have allocated more than 50% of available RAM to PS.
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Steve Lehman

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Steve Sprengel, 

I used to be a Champion and I am a MCSE.  Yes, an error message will come u p if something is afar inside, and no, a blue screen does not come up.  However it can shut down involuntarily but sometimes does not.   I was at Microsoft from 1992 to 2001 before my retirement but have kept current which was our motto at Microsoft in the 90's.   See ya.   
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Steve Lehman

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Michel, and friends,  

I think you are looking too closely at RAM allocation and PSE.  Windows distributes memory, not PSE.  So please steer away from PSE and memory problems.  The reason for the problems when 1803 is updating Win-10, is so many other factors not mentioned by those users.  For example, they have not mentioned devices installed before or after, which can cause a problem with Windows updates.  Even a new scanner can cause a problem depending on make, brand, model, and I have seen "all in one's" make Windows do things I never thought it could.  None of these who are having problems with 1803 are telling you anything more than the App and Windows.  My suggestion is for you to look at many other things other than that.  The difference between people like you and me who have not experienced these problems, and those who have, are the things they are not telling you.  When Windows pops an error message concerning hardware, it's hardware.  You and I have not added on a device lately, right?   I won't wager a bet on it, but I am thinking that's the real problem.  All other things I am reading from this particular forum are pure guesses, like this one maybe, but the error message is pointing at hardware.   It's a misbehaving device.  Devices also need to root to Windows correctly.   

Steve Lehman, mcse   


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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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What are you even talking about, here?  Adobe created the program, and a help page describing a registry workaround, so presumably they know what is up with their software. 
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Steve Lehman

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Also, I have seen RAM modules without a screw which is supposed to anchor the memory module, then the module swims all over the place inside, and creates problems.   Then Windows will still boot-up and throw up an error message about it. 

Here's what it does.  During the boot-up, the BIOS has a program called the POST which checks drives and memory and makes sure everything works before going to Open Systems which is a 7 layer protocol stack which is all the binary communications for the entire system (the heart of Windows) and then it goes onward to the system.ini, which is where the hardware shakes hands with the software, then it goes to the config.sys, then the win.ini, which is where all your icons are, and everything is checked including memory which needs to come to a checksum to equal a certain number for that particular version of Windows to prove that everything is plugged in correctly.  If not, Windows will throw up an error message.  And all it takes is a loose memory module, or a device that's not communicating, or even a new printer that's doesn't have its driver installed correctly.   

I've seen it, I've fixed it, I've done it to others for a joke, and my University professor in technology did it to me for a test each day when I walked into class.  Loose memory does what you are saying.  Devices do that also.  It's because it doesn't have enough memory support for a device or a new install or something is not working with Windows.  This doesn't necessarily need to be a PS problem.  It can easily be from memory allocation.   I still think it is hardware.   

Steve Lehman, mcse



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Michel BRETECHER, Champion

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Steve,
Don't  you find strange that thousands of Elements (and Photoshop) users experienced the same trouble just after the 1803 update? And that the workaround solved the problem? Also that moving back to the previous Win 10 also solved the problem? Also that there has been reports that some users had the same problem on two different computers?
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Steve Lehman

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Well, then I need to give you some reading material:   Here's goes.   

Yes, I concur that the work around worked and that going back to a previous Windows 10 worked. Also I agree that Adobe found a work around that can resolve your problem.  But what caused it in the first place?  All of you are looking for that answer, and I am trying to help. 

I can see it's not useful for me to teach technology.  Neither of you can "see" in your mind what goes on behind the Windows interface or what you see on a screen.  When I work on a solution, I see what's happening behind the interface and how the entire computer works, as my mind is on DOS commands and binary and what's going on behind the screen.  At Microsoft, when we received a new build of Windows, it came without a splash-screen so we could see everything working behind the interface - we could see DOS and behind that we could see the 1" and 0's working in binary, and engineers are taught to read binary, because each 12 numbers in 1's and 0's have a meaning and we know it well.   So, in my mind, when I work on Windows in any form, I see more than just the screen.   So, I am saying, I understand it.    And I still say, a device could have caused it.  You are asking why don't some of us have this problem?  And I am providing an answer for that - our configuration is different.  Our Windows version is the same, but beyond that, our devices connected to Windows are different and hardware could trigger a problem within an Adobe product, and maybe the Import (from hardware) in Adobe is triggering it as the next trigger and so forth.  Their engineer are finding a work around that works within the registry and it works for you as well.  But it could have originally been cause or triggered by a connected device, and most often we find that happening. 

Adobe doesn't have conflicting software and neither does Microsoft.  Whenever a work around is found, tests are taking first to find out what caused it, whether an antivirus program was a problem which is often, or if it was a hardware device.  They won't tell you what they found originally because most of you would argue with "not my computer, it doesn't do that".  So to avoid that, they simply find a solution and run with it.  So what I'm saying is, I think like them.  In my mind I am looking for a culprit from an error message that might lead me to what's going on, and I still think, according to the message that originated, there was hardware connected to one's computer that the rest of you don't have, and I am thinking it was hardware related if it was a connection. 

Windows resoles two problems:  it distributes memory consistently and it resolves port addressing problems by readdressing ports to resolve a problem.  We never see this happen.  To think your problem is a memory problem, I skip that because if it were, Windows would have resolved that.  So the next thing to look at is the memory hardware.  If it's not that then its a device (hardware again).    

Here's another example of how all of this works in a similar way.  When you use your cell phone, there is a computer at the base of each cell-tower that changes frequencies and looks for a clear path to complete your call.  I worked on these when I worked for Cellular One in the early 1980's to 90's, I had built these computers inside the tower-base.  Looking back on them now, I can see that what I built was racks of PC's in place of what we actually needed but because the company didn't fund us properly.  Later, they replaced the racks with mini-mainframes.  That's what is switching your calls and locating you to where you roam.  In those computers, in the program, it's called "roaming" and it tracks you by pinging your cell phone every 1 minute.  That part of the programming never changed.  Again, whenever I make a call I see in my mind whats taking place in the switchboard of those computers.   I know it because I was one of them who programmed it.   We worked for weeks from Monday to Saturdays going over the programs until we found a good way for that system to work and figured how many towers we needed and how far apart they needed to be.  Six miles was the answer.  So again, I am seeing it from the inside-out of a computer.   

IF that system (or any system) killed, we'd go our training to track through the system looking at cables, connectors, hardware, and software in that order.  Every engineer is taught that same order. 

I have a smartphone and that works beyond whatever we worked on back in the 80's to 90's.  The programming is the same in the towers, but the phones are totally different.  But the phone call per each cell phone happens in the exact same way, even after we programmed them, way back then.  

Steve Lehman, mcse   



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Steve Lehman

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In a second thought, I think you guys may have more questions.  I will give another answer in a simpler way. 

When you are changing anything in the registry, you are simply turning on or off something.  When an engineer finds a solution, he goes over the programming and decides that, if something is turned off, it could prevent an error message or prevent the cause of the problem.  If it's to turn off the error message itself, this is simple.  Those message come from the Windows programming but also reside in the registry and switching the registry is an easier solution, and this resolves the error message. 

Then if there is a conflict between hardware and software, again, by turning something off in the registry, that could prevent this hardware to software problem. 

So, the simple answer to resolving a problem is switching the registry.  But the cause of the problem is what Michel asked.  That is a harder answer to convince you about.   Refer to above for that.  I hope this is a simpler answer.   
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Steve Lehman

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If you want me to point at a software problem, I would point to a malware that can invade a computer that can take a lot of memory away.  Viruses do same for that particular reason to keep the computer busy while a worm erases the drive, and a hack-cookie can do that.   Photoshop CS is meant to be utilized in the cloud which can account for the slow down and/or memory problems.   The CS programs are new to Windows and could be another problem and can be a reason to turn off something in the registry to make it work on a PC better - outside of the cloud.   As for software, it can be one or more or an accumulation of drivers, new devices installed, which are not installed all the way, and many other things.  Michel, you and I may not be experiencing these problems because we don't like "changes in our cages" as we leave our technology the same while it works well for us.   
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Steve Lehman

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BTW, the CS products whether its Adobe or Microsoft (Office 365) will use the Virtual Memory instead of RAM to keep it apart from PC based products.