Premiere Elements: Support custom/non-standard video formats

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Premiere Elements help states, "If your source footage requires a custom project preset, you can create one.":

http://help.adobe.com/en_US/premieree...

However, you can't. If you want a non-standard resolution, you can't create a preset for one.

So I decided to import my non-standard video into a standard preset and just crop. Sadly, that didn't work either as the application just clobbered my resolution and messed up the aspect ratio as well.

Details and screen shots are here: http://forums.adobe.com/message/32022...

I never got any help or interaction from the team there, so I'm not even sure if this has been fixed in version 9 or not.
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Lee Jay

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Posted 7 years ago

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Lee Jay

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Wow...I'm overwhelmed with the team's support over the last 10 days.
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David B, Official Rep

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Hi Lee,

Sorry no one answered your question sooner. The information in the Premiere Elements Help is unclear and misleading. I'm working on getting it updated based on your posting here.

800x600 are unusual dimensions for a video. All of the presets in Premiere Elements are really designed around standard video formats. As far as Premiere Elements is concerned, a possible workaround might be bringing the footage into a project preset with dimensions large enough to encompass the 800x600 footage which matches all the source clips other settings, such as PAR, frame rate, field order, etc. If this didn't give good results, I would agree with the feedback on the forums, that one of the more professional grade applications like Premiere Pro or After Effects would be the best bet. If this footage was for one time use then maybe using the trial version of one of those apps would suffice for this instance?

Do you have a case number from contacting support or customer number I could use to look you up in our system. I was thinking I could contact you over the phone to work on the issue further.

-Dave
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Lee Jay

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It's not 800x600, it's 600x800.

As I said in the thread I referenced, I did take it into a preset large enough to encompass this video, and then I cropped it. However, Premier Elements destroyed the video quality entirely when I did that. See the Premiere Elements screen shot in the other thread.

Is any of this fixed in version 9? I bought version 8 at work for this job and it failed so I used VirtualDub (free) instead. That worked just fine. So, when I bought version 9 for home I bought Photoshop Elements only and not Premier Elements because I didn't get an answer in the other thread about if this was fixed in version 9 or not.
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David B, Official Rep

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Sorry for the delay Lee, I was away for a week.

I rendered a 600x800 uncompressed video from After Effects and brought it into Premiere Elements 8 into a HDV 1080i 1440x1080 project preset and attempted to export it out as a cropped 600x800 wmv.

A couple of things that I was noticing when I was testing,

First the 600x800 video was being scaled to fit the frame size by default, so the 800 vertical pixel height was being scaled to 1080. I tested exports both turning this feature on and off, it didn't seem to make a major difference in quality for me.

I wasn't sure what method you were using for cropping the output video, if I go into the Advanced section for a Windows Media file to create a custom output preset and enter in a frame size this doesn't crop the video, but rather scales the video to fit within whatever dimensions you enter. This made my video have a fuzzy appearance like what you described.

I did notice that if I exported with a preset that matched the project preset that the output was similar to the way the clip was appeared in the application while editing. I exported using the HD 1080i 30 preset and the quality was okay. It had black borders around the video but the quality seemed to be okay. Not sure if this would work in your case or not?

I don't think upgrading to Premiere Elements 9 would make a difference in this case. You could test with the trial version but I suspect the results would be the same. If you had to have your output be 600x800, then I still think Premiere Pro or After Effects would be your best bet.
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Lee Jay

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The output had to be 600x800. I don't remember the crop method I tried, but I'm pretty sure it was a crop.

As I said, I did get this job done with VirtualDub.

When I bought Premier Elements, my goal was to have something powerful and flexible but simple to use like Photoshop Elements. Premier Elements doesn't have the ability to make a custom preset like the help said it did, and it was quite a pain to get it to do this relatively simple task.

I'd like easy-to-create custom presets and easy-to-do simple stuff like cropping, exporting at different sizes, and exporting in different formats (I know the whole CODEC fiasco makes this harder for video). This is akin to creating any size canvas, exporting any size and any file type in PS Elements. That's what I was expecting from Premier Elements, but was disappointed, and so I didn't buy it at home when I bought PS Elements 9.
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David B, Official Rep

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Hi Lee,

Glad hear you found a solution at least. I've used Virtual Dub too but its been a while.

I'm sorry about the misinformation in the help but thank you for pointing it out, like I mentioned I'm working on getting it changed. The software is meant to be a general purpose editor but this is one its limitations. I 'll pass on your feedback for custom project presets and cropping options to the program developers.
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Brian Aird

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Its simpler and more friendly to allow Elements users the ability to create their own presets they way they like them. That would keep people loyal to Adobe. Forcing upgrades to the Pro version is bit harsh.

Another preset anomaly:

PAL
720p at 24 frames per second is available in a preset, but 1080p at 24 fps is forced to 23.976. This is an adjusted fps for greater compatibility with NTSC telecine pull-down conversion. It has nothing to do with PAL. Except that even in Europe PAL Blu-ray is sometimes distributed at 23.976 and no-one complains (1/1000 slow down).

Anyway, film purists would surely want 24p and not 23.976.