Predicting export file size

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I regularly waste entire afternoons re-exporting my work to try and fit it onto my 16gb USB sticks for delivery.
While exporting I cannot do any other editing so it does really lose me a lot of work time.

What I currently do is look at the folder size about half way through and workout roughly what size it will end up being, stop the process if it's too big, turn down quality a little and try again and so on.
I like to give the best quality photographs I can fit on the USB!

Is there already a way of LR telling me beforehand what the eventual folder size will be that I've not discovered yet?
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Tracy

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Posted 1 year ago

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John R. Ellis, Champion

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Rather than adjusting the quality in the Export settings, you could use the option LImit File Size To.  Use Mac Finder or Windows File Explorer to find the exact amount of free space available on the drive, divide that by the number of photos, and enter that in Limit File Size To.  LR sometimes exceeds the limit by a 1 or 2%, but it is often under the limit by at least that much, so it should all average out.  

Beware that in Windows File Explorer, 1 K = 1024, 1 M = 1024 x 1024, and 1 G = 1024 x 1024 x 1024.    Whereas in Mac Finder, and in LR Export settings on both systems, 1 K = 1000, 1 M = 1000 x 1000, and 1 G = 1000 x 1000 x 1000.
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Tracy

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Thank you, I will give this a try the next time I export and see how it goes.
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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Dumb question–Rather than "compromise" your work by using a low Quality setting why not simply purchase larger USB flash drives? Prices keep dropping and a 32 GB stick can be had for ~$1O US. You can still use the 16GB drives by sending two for each recipient and fulfill the rest with new 32GB drives.

https://www.amazon.com/SanDisk-Cruzer-Frustration-Free-Packaging-SDCZ36-032G-AFFP/dp/B007JR532M/ref=...

You may also want to read this analysis of Lightroom JPEG Quality settings. The consensus of the author Jeffrey Friedl is that a Quality setting of 75 (70-76 setting) will look as good as 100 for most all image files. The only reason to use a higher Quality setting is if the JPEG file must be edited and resaved by the recipient.

http://regex.info/blog/lightroom-goodies/jpeg-quality
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Tracy

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I use custom made presentation USB boxes and the next size up is a good extra £300 every couple of months. My expenses are already too high! 

Thank you for that link though, I recently had to go as low as 89% and it made me feel really uncomfortable so this article might help me get over that. 
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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Understood. You can also resize the images to fit the resolution of the presentation box's display. For example with a 1920x1080 display use the below Export settings. This "constrains" the export images to a bounding box of 1920x1080 pixels. Landscape mages will have a width of 1920 pixels and Portrait images a height of 1080 pixels. This is the largest size required to view images at the display's native resolution. If other display types are to be used enter the values for the highest resolution display such as 3840x2160 for a 4K display.

The presumption is that the image files are for screen display purposes only and not print.

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eartho

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You're delivering 16GB's of jpgs???
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Tracy

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Well I the weddings I am booked for are on average 14-18 hours long so that's quite a few pictures!