PHOTOSHOP - Place Linked Size honors physical size of image - Bug or Feature?

  • 1
  • Problem
  • Updated 3 years ago
  • Not a Problem
  • (Edited)
When i place a linked smart object, the placed image is placed in respect to the physical dimensions rather than the pixel dims. So, if i place an image which is 1000x1000px into a document which is the same size but a different dpi, the placed image refers to the physical dimensions rather than px dims.

Steps to repro:

- create new doc: 1000x1000px @ 300dpi
- save as psd, but don't close (image A)
- image size to 100dpi with no resample (image is still 1000x1000px)
- save as with different name than the first (image B)
- file/place as linked Image A
Result: image A is now 300% smaller and actually has the wrong px dims in the option bar... 500 instead of 1000!

And yes, Resize Image During Place is turned off in the prefs.
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eartho

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Posted 3 years ago

  • 1
Photo of Chris Cox

Chris Cox

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That is working correctly -- the physical size of the image is what matters most often (and allow replacement of low rez artwork with higher rez artwork later).
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eartho

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Good to know.
While i can understand the logic of this behavior, i think it's a terrible decision and there needs to be an option to turn it off. The biggest problem i have is that there's no way of seeing that your placed image has been scaled. In fact, i've specified in the prefs that i don't want my image to be scaled when placing and yet, Ps is not only scaling my linked image, it's doing so with absolutely no indication that it's been scaled... How is this ok?
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Chris Cox

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OK, maybe we need to change the preferences wording - because that preference has nothing to do with the logical scaling to match physical size.

We might be able to add a switch for honoring the pixel size instead of the more commonly used physical size.