Photoshop: Select multiple folders or select a folder that contains subfolders filled with images

  • 1
  • Idea
  • Updated 3 months ago
  • Implemented
  • (Edited)
Yesterday I had to batch process a bunch of images in separate folders. I knew the desired width but not height, so I could not use the image processor. What slowed me up with using Batch processing was that I had to choose each folder one at a time to run the batch. I'd love it if you could add the option to select multiple folders, or perhaps even better, to select a parent folder so that the batch would be run on all images inside subfolders!

While I'm here...maybe also add the ability to know the width but not height and height but not width in the Image Processor :)
Photo of Sue Jenkins

Sue Jenkins

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
  • awesome! I Love Photoshop!

Posted 3 months ago

  • 1
Photo of Johan Elzenga

Johan Elzenga, Champion

  • 1109 Posts
  • 448 Reply Likes
That option already exists. Image Processor does not resize the image to the height and width dimensions, it fits the image into those dimensions. That means the following: suppose you have all kinds of images, some in portrait size and some in landscape size, with different aspect ratios as well. You want to resize them so their longest size is 1000 pixels. In that case you fill in 1000 pixels for height and 1000 pixels for width.

What Image Processor will now do is not crop the images so they all become a square of 1000 x 1000 pixels, but fit the images into those dimensions. So a 3000 x 1500 pixels image will become 1000 x 500 pixels, a 3000 x 6000 pixels image will become 500 x 1000 pixels and a 3000 x 2700 pixels image will become 1000 x 900 pixels.
Photo of Sue Jenkins

Sue Jenkins

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thanks Johan. I avoided using the Image Processor because I would often know the needed width but not the needed height, which might vary depending on the original image size.

The thing with Image Processor, though, is that you MUST enter both a width and height, whereas with the Batch Processor you may run an action that only specifies one dimension.
Photo of Cristen Gillespie

Cristen Gillespie

  • 1133 Posts
  • 304 Reply Likes
<The thing with Image Processor, though, is that you MUST enter both a width and height, whereas with the Batch Processor you may run an action that only specifies one dimension.>

Are you able to determine what the greatest height of your selection of images is? Image Processor will maintain proportions, so say your greatest height is 4179px, but you need to fit a width of 1000 px. It will reduce the image to fit to 1000 px or less, without ever exceeding the 4179 px in height. You may have an image that is less than 1000 px in width, since you allowed it to reach a maximum of 4179 in height. But it will determine the closest fit it can make without distorting the image.

Your other option is to install Image Processor Pro — which really Adobe should license — and then enable "do not enlarge." It will use the height or width you specified as the target width/height, and make everything fit proportionally to that measurement.  But it will enlarge the file if your fixed width is larger than the actual file's width. "Do not enlarge" is apparently somewhat flexible. '-}  So weed out every file that already meets your target maximum—another really tedious process, but you can use Cmd-F in Bridge to search for files that exceed or equal or are less than. . . And then just run on the results.

I agree that this is more complicated than it probably has to be. It would be nice to be able to simply give a maximum single height or width, and have it fit to that proportionally in IP, but IP isn't as full featured as IP Pro.

I'm not as sure what kind of numbers (customers) would make folder and all subfolders work often enough to be worth it to Adobe to make the change, unless the option was really very easy to build in. It wouldn't do much for my workflow, but I can easily understand how it might help someone else out.
Photo of Sue Jenkins

Sue Jenkins

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thanks for your clear explanation Cristen. That Image Processor solution would work for my needs.

You make a valid point too about whether or not there would be enough demand to warrant making multiple folders or folder+subfolders an option. In my own workflow, images are often presorted into folders yet still need resizing and optimization (among other things), so having that option (multiple folders or folder+subfolders) would greatly speed up my workflow.
Photo of David Tristram

David Tristram, Employee

  • 118 Posts
  • 55 Reply Likes
batch has a "apply to subfolders" option.  It might even follow symlinks, so you could try making a folder and then adding "aliasing" links to the different folders with your images.  
Photo of Sue Jenkins

Sue Jenkins

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Doh! Thanks David. I didn't see it before and it's RIGHT THERE! Yay!