Photoshop: How do you draw a rectangle to a specific measurement in inches

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I'm new to actual drawing with Photoshop. I'm trying to draw an Interior Elevation of a room to a specific size. For example, one wall is 18'-6" wide by 10' tall. I want to draw a rectangle to this size; how do I do that?
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Amy Biondolillo

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Chris Cox

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Use the rectangle tool and specify the exact size you want it.  Or just drag it out and watch the size in the info palette.
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tomasz ćwik

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photoshop don't have that kind of units this is not sketchup :p ;  when you choose rectangle tool/shape option ; you can set pixel size of this tool;
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Chris Cox

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Photoshop does have a fixed size option for the rectangle tool, and you can type in any units you want (ie: 8 in, 8 cm, 8 mm, 8 pt, etc.)
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tomasz ćwik

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have?. in rectangle tool ?
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Max Johnson, Champion

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You can add the literal "in" or "cm" to the end of your number and it will figure it out.
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Max Johnson, Champion

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When someone says "I'm new to photoshop, I want to draw a rectangle...", "Use the rectangle tool" is not particularly helpful.

Yes, there is a rectangle tool. Select it.



Instead of dragging a rectangle, click once in your image and a dialog should appear giving you the option to specify the width and height of your new rectangle.

Making an image that is literally 10 feet across is really overkill. If you did do that, I would recommend first changing the image ppi (pixels per inch) to be something like 16px/inch so each pixel is equivalent to 1/16th inch. Or work out your own scale conversion...

Image -> Image Size , then change the "Resolution" setting to be 16 instead of what it is set to, which is probably 72 or higher.
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Kai Bonsaksen

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You saved my girlfriends photo
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TF BKNY

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Well, when it will come time to print my guess is that you will come back in search for help because setting the resolution to something so low (16 ppi) will yield terrible results and leaves you with a terrible low quality image which is surely unfit for storage and print... at most would be ok on screen, though I also have my doubts there since most screen res ar 72ppi or higher. Dpi applies to print, ppi to screen... to know a little more about it you can read this article https://99designs.com/blog/tips/ppi-vs-dpi-whats-the-difference/  although informative it does have a couple in accuracies and it's not extensive by any means, it's still good for novices to grasp those concepts.

1) Photoshop lack of consistency here in th UI (been like that for years) when it comes to letting users choose the unit for the elements (shapes, resizing, etc) which leads to a confusing and bad UX especially for anyone unfamiliar with it

2) Use the DPI if you need to print a document, PPI won't matter much as you can zoom in and out on screen, while th print will have a fixed appearance. Just make sure you know the best settings to use with your printer (or printing service) and use that DPI for your document. Then if you need to work in metric or imperial sizes set that in the Pref. (Units) and when creating shapes do what suggested above select a shape and click on your document. When prompted to enter a size use something like "3 in" without quotation marks to enter a size of 3 inches and Photoshop will create the shape with the desired dimensions.

Hope this helps :) 

Cheers!


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Amy Biondolillo

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Okay! I was tying a quotation mark instead of actually doing "in". That was the problem haha. Thank you everyone.