Photoshop: Gradient and Overlay Layers Lost When Exporting

  • 1
  • Problem
  • Updated 11 months ago
  • Not a Problem
I have a specific file with a group with multiple raster layers and a single gradient layer attached. When saving, saving for web, placing the PSD in another document, or even copying merged layers and pasting within the same document, the appearance of the raster layers shift and the gradient is lost entirely. I’ve attempted to switch to legacy compositing, but it’s had no effect. Would there happen to be a way to export this with the correct appearance?

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Josh Spence

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Posted 11 months ago

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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Hi Josh, would it be possible to get a copy if the file in question to try and troubleshoot?
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Josh Spence

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Absolutely! Thank you. The layers in question are those to linked to the group marked 'Blq'.

https://we.tl/t-oVU6CCwgey



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eartho, Champion

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Josh, the appearance change you're seeing isn't real, it's just a rendering issue when you're zoomed out. If you take the .psd file you linked here and select all>copy merged>paste, you see the gradient disappear, right? Now, zoom into 100% and toggle the pasted layer on/off... no change, right? 

This is just the result of Ps rendering the zoomed out appearance and your file is totally fine.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Hi Josh, eartho is right. There are some layer effects/styles that appear differently at different zoom levels due to image interpolation. The only accurate view of an image is at 100% zoom.
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Josh Spence

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Ahhhh, excellent. Thank you folks, I thought I was losing my mind, hahaha.
I will be sure to take that into account in the future.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Yep. Noise layers are the most different (as your file points out). There's no way to shrink a field of noise and accurately render it at all zooms. Always zoom into 100% with noise to make sure it looks right.