Photoshop Elements, Chromatic Aberration - how to open a RAW photo I first fixed in Silky Pix

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I have a Panasonic LUMIX LX100 - some photos are getting extreme chromatic aberration.  I decided to try the included Silky Pix editing software, and was able to get rid of the color fringe, but then I don't know how to open it in Elements' ACR to continue editing it.  It may be a question for a Panasonic forum, but maybe someone here has had this experience. Elements' version of ACR doesn't have the chromatic aberration adjustment the professional Photoshop program has....

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Kathleen Madeline

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Posted 1 year ago

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Wolfgang Exler

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You have to export the image in SilkyPix to a seperate image file, e.g. in TIFF format. Then you can open this exported TIFF image in PSE for further editing
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Kathleen Madeline

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Within SilkyPix, you can save a RAW image as a JPG or TIF file.  Then you can open in ACR in Elements,but I am not sure if that is the only option.
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Wolfgang Exler

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another option may be to use Metaraw. You can download a trial version from http://www.thepluginsite.com/products/metaraw/index.htm
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Steve Lehman

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Kathleen,  
By now you have probably found which RAW format your Panasonic utilizes.   In Adobe elements there is not a pluggin for RAW (directly) unless you load a pluggin like drivers that already come in a Photoshop.   But in regular Photoshop you (probably found out) there is a RAW pluggin, and the file format for your Panasonic is RW2 or RWL which is what you'd look for in its converter-pluggin.   Your converter will ask what you are converting from (RW2) and then what you want to convert to (TIFF).   The correct format to convert to is an uncompressed format like TIFF instead of a JPG or PDF.    JPG will render the file useless as it compresses nearly 90%.    As for PDF there are several types of PDF (PDF-JPG, PDF-GIF, PDF not compressed) and your file would not convert to PDF easily or directly.   Convert to TIFF so you won't lose any of its pixels and then you can edit like RAW (TIFF) once the photo gets into Photoshop.   Then you can save it in a compress file if that's the way you want it.   Each camera has its own RAW file format, Nikon is NEF, Canon is CRW or CR2.   Each will convert to TIFF in a regular Photoshop.   Adobe has already heard complaints concerning no pluggins for RAW in Elements.   

Steve Lehman, MCSE responding   
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Kathleen Madeline

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Thanks for your input - I had gotten as far as fixing the chromatic aberration in Silky Pix and saved as a TIFF so I guess it is as good as it gets.  I also otherwise edited the photo in Silky Pix to see how it worked, but I do like the more familiar workspace of ACR and Elements....  I will probably only use Silky Pix on images with chromatic aberration, since the TIFF I opened in ACR only had the embedded Camera Profile and not the list of choices as a RAW image from the Panasonic.
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Wolfgang Exler

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If you are familiar with ACR and Elements I kindly suggest to check Metwaraw as this works seemless integrated within Photoshop Elements
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Steve Lehman

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Kathleen, 

You sound like you already know about file formats, but if you want a list of them, we have that on my own company website page noted below.   Check them out.  They're a good lesson and good to know them.   Also, I teach these for Adobe.   Happy computing.   

http://pixsavers.com/photoformats.html

Steve Lehman, MCSE Responding