photoshop elements 13 camera raw version compatability

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 9 months ago
Hi

I am trying to open RAW pictures I took with a Pentax K70 in camera raw through photoshop elements 13. But it won't work. I updated to the version 11.1. But it won't recognise the .pef files. There is no problem to open a .jpg file. What is the problem? And how can I solve is?
Photo of Marie

Marie

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 9 months ago

  • 1
Photo of Todd Shaner

Todd Shaner, Champion

  • 1576 Posts
  • 535 Reply Likes
You need to check in two places to determine Photoshop Elements compatibility with the Camera Raw plugin version required for your Pentax K70 camera:

1) https://helpx.adobe.com/camera-raw/kb/camera-raw-compatible-applications.html

Adobe Premiere Elements 13 ships with ACR 8.6  and is compatible ACR 9.0 and no higher!

2) https://helpx.adobe.com/camera-raw/kb/camera-raw-plug-supported-cameras.html

Pentax K-70 PEF  requires ACR 9.8, which is compatible with Photoshop Elements version 15 and higher.

Your other option is to use the Adobe DNG Converter https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/adobe-dng-converter.html





Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 847 Posts
  • 96 Reply Likes
Just a note:   The DNG converter will convert your RAW to TIFF format (uncompressed) or JPG (compressed) or any other format where you can edit photos in Elements.  As RAW is uncompressed, at least some of us prefer TIFF format.   
Photo of Todd Shaner

Todd Shaner, Champion

  • 1575 Posts
  • 535 Reply Likes
Not correct! The Adobe DNG Converter converts proprietary raw files such as ARW, CR2, NEF, and the OP's Pentax K70 PEF raw files to DNG file format.
https://petapixel.com/2015/12/08/dng-the-pros-cons-and-myths-of-the-adobe-raw-file-format/
The original camera file's raw image data is unmodified and can be opened in Photoshop Elements, Photoshop, Lightroom same as the original raw file. You can even choose the option to embed the original raw file into the DNG file at time of conversion. This allows recovering the original raw file at a later time if you need to edit it in the camera manufacturer's software. However, it will increase the DNG file size by ~2X.
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 847 Posts
  • 96 Reply Likes
Again Todd, you have corrected me, but wrongly.  But I did not say anything about the camera native file format.  I said the conversion can be to TIFF once it gets into Photoshop or any other for mat, because, in the end that person will need to change from its native file format of a 16 bit file, to an 8 bit file in either TIFF or JPG for printing.  Printers will not take a 16 bit file, they will only take an 8 bit file. Ya know Todd, I went to college 4 years in technology and you have continued to correct me as if calling me stupid.  I totally resent your double correcting me each time. And this is the 4th time you have done that.  Are you a know-it-all or genius?  If you can prove that I will bow to your royalty.  But you keep correcting me and then you keep denying that you do it.   I need to be frank, and I speak for 2 others, =thee are at least  three of us who hate to be in the same forum as you, as you have corrected them also.  That's all I am saying here and no more.
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 847 Posts
  • 96 Reply Likes
I would like to add that 4 years in technology at a University, plus 16 engineering certifications, plus 14 years at Microsoft is why I am not liking your jumping on me as if to call me "stupid".  And again, one other person who spoke with me about you today said, he is as wary as me when entering a forum with you.  Maybe you are too ready to correct everyone.  I had to say something.  That's all from me.   
Photo of Pete Green

Pete Green, Customer Advocate

  • 752 Posts
  • 147 Reply Likes
Hi Steve,

Correction where correction may be due should be welcomed, as we all get a chance to learn a little bit more from each other and not enter into the defensive.

When you write, "The DNG converter will convert your RAW to TIFF format (uncompressed) or JPG (compressed) or any other format where you can edit photos in Elements.", there is a bit of mis-information there or perhaps mistakenly missed portions of the whole story.
It's then up to the user to decide how to save out as a differing file type. The data in a DNG as Todd has mentioned, is still raw data, and the user then has the option to save out to their format of choice depending on needs relative to the scenario at hand.

Perhaps you meant to write that you have the option to convert from DNG to another non-raw format and Todd jumped in to provide more information. Mistakes happen.

I'll also add that nobody called anybody stupid here, the addition of information need not be taken personally. 

Regards,
Pete
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 847 Posts
  • 96 Reply Likes
Pete,
Apparently you haven't known Tom's history.  He's always a smarting off at any one of three of us always and at 67 I finding myself growing wary of him as he wears me down. He takes bits and pieces and makes something out of it always. After, nothing he says makes sense most of the time as he appears to only insult a person. 

I apologize for my complaint but I hope this explanation might help you understand.   

Yes I meant to convert using the DNG convert then change to another format. And then, the piece about 16 bits that convert to 8 bits (another conversion) is when the file goes to the printer.  Check your technicians on this one.  I know my stuff.  I am correct on this one. 

Or check it yourself, take a RAW file, convert it to TIFF - and although it has changed to TIFF it is still a compressed 16 bit format from the native camera file, then send it to the printer, and it will ask if you want to change it to 8 bits for the printer.  Printers will not take a 16 bit file.  Ya know, you guys always argue that you know more.  I wonder if I was wrong to go to college.  

Steve Lehman, mcse