Photoshop Elements 10 will not shut down properly

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After an Adobe Reader update and Windows update Elements does not shut down properly anymore after existing the program.  It remains open but cannot be invoked again without rebooting the computer to make sure it is no longer running.  Has anyone else had this problem? Is there a patch or solution anyone know about to fix this problem? 
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Tom

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Posted 2 years ago

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Steve Lehman

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Hello Tom,  

Adobe Reader has never caused this problem.  Windows updates have.  You don't say which Windows version or if you have other Photoshop products on the same system.  I will need to address all issues regardless.  

First, there is a fix for "after Win-10 update" online and I will go back to that later.  Next, a corrupt Photoshop program can effect a straight program such as PSE10.  If this is the problem, all of them will need to be uninstalled/reinstalled.  If PSE10 is your only Photoshop, an uninstall/reinstall may all that's needed.  Try this first.   

Again, you don't say which Windows version you have.  Assuming its Windows 10, uninstalling your last Windows update and installing the update again (or allowing Windows to install it) may not fix the problem but you should try that first.  As for Windows 10 update corrupting an Adobe program, this can happen temporarily but it bounces back in most cases, otherwise reinstalling will fix it.  

Fixing the Windows update, if there has not been activity on the computer since the update, refer to your Windows System Restore feature to take you back to yesterday or back two days.  In Windows 10 there is not the familiar calendar of restore dates like in Windows System Restore in prior Windows versions.  In Windows 10 it only gives 2 to 3 dates to choose from and it might detect a download and want to retain that as it restores back. It retains a download of apps installed in the last 24 hours - if it finds and lists them.

To fix Windows without the restore feature, there are update problem fixes online, depending on whether you want a simple or technical.  All of them focus on the same list of Windows update fixes, and each fix has several steps to follow and follow them carefully.  If it instructs you to go into the Windows Shell in Windows 10, treat Windows Shell like the Regedit, be careful.  There are commands in the Shell that won't work in the Regedit as this comes in handy.  Those commands and what they do can debug Windows.  Just Follow the instructions. And then, if you have fixed the problem and Windows returns back to a blue-screen, don't worry.  In Windows 10 that screen has been modified to give suggestions of where to go to fix a problem or at least get your computer operating in Safe Mode.  It also can return back to the Windows System Restore (again).  In most cases, if you perform a fix listed, even though it may return to the same blue screen without an apparent fix, upon returning to Windows there may be a fix there anyway.  The blue screen is not programmed to tell you what Windows did to fix the problem.  Microsoft doesn't want everyone under the hood at the Regedit unless absolutely necessary, so in Windows 10 the Windows Shell was made a little more friendly with commands to use, although it'll show lots of its codes so don't change anything.  It's commands will be familiar to Windows Shell as it may drop the commands right into place itself.  I cannot fix your problem without being there, and I cannot remote.  Also, I cannot fix a problem due to neglected instructions, so be careful.  Let me know what happened.   <mcse responding>   
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Tom

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Thanks Steve.
We have tried uninstalling and reinstalling and that does NOT fix the problem. Photoshop Elements 10 is simply not shutting down as it should when existing the program

The Computer here is:
Intel 2 Quad CPU, Q8300@2.5 GHz
64 bit operating system
4 GB RAM
Windows 7 Home Premium, Service Pack 1

Any addition suggestions or clarifications would be appreciation for you --- or anyone else.
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Steve Lehman

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How are your other apps running?  Do you have other Adobe products?  How are they operating?  Did you uninstall the Windows update and reboot?  Is your PSE10 on your screen or is PSE10 just in the task tray?   If so we can eliminate that. Is PSE10  on your screen as you reboot?  Is your Windows 7 an upgrade from an earlier Windows version?   Did you install Service Pack 2 for your Windows 7?  (it was not called that back then but was available)   If not, think about it before installing it.  It's 5 years of updating in one pack but it gets rid of malware, and especially things that will stall an app.  Check it out here http://windowsreport.com/windows-7-service-pack-2/ . Most importantly, do you have a virus scanner or a malware checker. If you do not, please get one before proceeding with your SP2.  I am thinking ideally this is due to malware or a virus if its not an updated needed.  Was the update SP2?  If so, it could be the problem if installing the whole thing while an app is on the screen, its BIG.  Also, you may consider a Windows upgrade since your computer will support Windows 10.  Your Windows 7 SP1 was from 2011 with older 2008 updates.   I need all of these answered before going further.  I appreciate your time.   
     
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Steve Lehman

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Tom,

I have a quick note here and I might conclude.  If you have info for me, bring it.  Otehrwise I might close this case.  

I think you had a Windows-7 SP2 download and it is a very large file, and it froze your PSE10 while PSE10 was in progress, and that is understandably upsetting.  You may have interrupted that SP2 download which is okay as it resumes the next time you log onto your computer, which it probably did and froze your program again.  It was either the SP2 download, or it was a malware download with an unusually big file which is rare. It was not a hacker.  I really don't think its a PSE10 problem.  I think it will work when the Windows update has cleared finally.  Let it download.  There is not a disc for your 2011 SP2 for Windows-7 because in 2011 Microsoft was pushing for a new program deadline although Windows 10 may not have been out yet, as engineers work 24-7 during a deadline year.  SP2 for Windows 7 is really not called SP2 but most Unix engineers online call it that.   This may be the reason you never saw it online.   It was available in 2011 and if you didn't get it perhaps because most people may refuse a suspicious download which is okay.  Also, if your screen did not turn totally black or did not do lots of blinking to black, then you did not get a hacker. The chance of getting a key-logging hacker is 1 trillion to 1.  When they remote through a computer the screen turns black or blinks as they are using your remote feature to get in.  They don't usually spend more than 1 to 3 minutes to see if you are typing numbers which may be related to bank numbers and that's what they are after.  If you want to guard against such things, those programs are called 'key-logger prevention' programs.  They are like malware programs that do not conflict with a virus program.  The hacker's software follows the DOS-KEY typing key-log that DOS records behind Windows in case the machine language has a buffer problem and needs to get caught up.  Real engineers don't spend any time hacking computers no matter how important they may seem to anyone.  

Incidentally, the report about Yahoo being hacked, the truth about those reports is that the news people like to sensationalize news reports.  Yahoo's servers in San Jose are bigger than the servers in Microsoft which there, they have many and they are spread out throughout a very large campus.  During my Yahoo tour in San Jose I could see old fashioned proxy servers which decoy a hacker to make a server appear to be open when indeed it is not.  Hackers won't waste their time with those.  The hack was most likely kids who like to prove their technology knowledge.  The information hacked was only names, no email addresses and no bank numbers as it was a sad day for a very stupid hacker.   

So, I have covered all the the possibilities.  You do not have a PSE10 problem.  It is a Windows problem.  As a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE), please trust me for knowing Microsoft products.  Adobe sends me into their blogs whenever there is a greater chance of a Windows problem than an Adobe problem.   In this forum we work together.  As a volunteer, I will answer any other questions.  

The one thing I regret is that I didn't have enough information from you concerning your software to make a clearer decision on this problem.  I was not asking a quiz of questions to scare you away.  I was merely trying to understand the problem completely and hoping to resolve it.   If you have further info or more questions, I will be back with you.  I wish you luck in downloading your SP2 but frankly, that service pack has the same programming as what came in the next Windows version.   It patched communication problems - almost everything except the key logger problem which is new since 2016.  It had most of what Windows 10 has now which is why it was not called SP2, it was only called "that big Windows 7 add-on" - a BIG program and it did sometimes freeze up software like you described.  Windows 10 users are receiving updates to cover most communications leaks and we are on top of the key loggers.  Norton's will have a scanner for that along with their virus-scanner.  On their site they have lists of the best key logger prevention software programs.  I suggest when your computer is in better health and there is nothing more to do with it, you might get that software.  But I really hope you upgrade to Windows 10.  It will not wipe out your current applications, it simply adds software over your windows 7 Operating System.  Windows 10 does lots more and shows and feels much different than Windows 7.  When retrieving files you can see more of your files than before and you can see what files to find them in much easier.  I have two machines with Windows 10 and one with Windows 7 and I will upgrade that one.  Frankly I still have two other machine with Windows XP which was probably one of the most stable NT based systems in the history of Microsoft.  Just to make you curious, I still have an older 386 with Windows 3.11 as it is fun to swap circuit boards.  Those can also be upgraded to Winodiws 10 but with more robust memory and a change to 64 bit, but their screens are much too small with low resolution.  All my newer screens are 24 inch.  Happy computing, clink a glass, and thanks for reading.    Steve Lehman, MCSE responding.   How am I doing Jeff? (at Adobe)