Photoshop: How do I achieve this 3D type effect?

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Hi there,

I will get straight to the point, does anyone know how to achieve this in photoshop? Or is there a filter online I can use?
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Vic

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Posted 2 years ago

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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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Create a white text on a black background, blur it and use
3D > New Mesh From Layer > Depth Map to > Plane
to create a 3D object and apply a line Pattern to the Diffuse Texture. 
(Edited)
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Vic

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Lovely! Thanks!
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Dan Ash

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Really cool, but can you go into more detail what "apply a line Pattern to the Diffuse Texture" means?
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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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Dan Ash

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phenomenal!  
Still figuring this out but really appreciate the help
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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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Forgot to mention one point: 
If one only want the lines (so to speak) without lighting and shadows one should set the Scene to »Unlit Texture« before hitting the Render-button. 
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herbert wegen

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Still, one issue remains: Photoshop displacement mapping (a depth map is something different in 3d terminology) is limited to a paltry 256x256 px map resolution.

See https://forums.adobe.com/thread/1883454

Which means you will never attain the same smooth result in Photshop. Also, the displacement map should be at least 16bpc for best results.

The trick is to use an emission map (for the lines), and another shader for the glossy effect. And the letters outline should NOT be too blurred, otherwise you will get the rather blown out effect as seen in Pfaffenbichler's result.

Furthermore, the camera should be set to orthographic OR a very large focal length , to match the original. And it is difficult in Photoshop to control the mesh density - which should be very high for best results.

All in all, it is much easier to generate this effect at a high quality in a dedicated 3d application (such as Blender). And the render times in Photoshop are very long compared.

Here is a quick test done in Blender. It renders in ~25 seconds on my aging machine (8 years old). I did use a curve adjustment in Photoline to improve the contrast a bit, so that it resembles the original somewhat better.

If you are interested in the original Blender file, download it here:
http://www.estructor.altervista.org/displacment_example.zip

In case you are not aware: Blender is an open source professional 3d package. Get it here: www.blender.org

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herbert wegen

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That depends on your definition - displacement map or height map are acceptable, but certainly not depth map. A depth map requires a (camera) viewpoint.

In 3D computer graphics a depth map is an image or image channel that contains information relating to the distance of the surfaces of scene objects from a viewpoint. The term is related to and may be analogous to depth buffer, Z-buffer, Z-buffering and Z-depth.[1] The "Z" in these latter terms relates to a convention that the central axis of view of a camera is in the direction of the camera's Z axis, and not to the absolute Z axis of a scene.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_map

In computer graphics, a heightmap or heightfield is a raster image used to store values, such as surface elevation data, for display in 3D computer graphics. A heightmap can be used in bump mapping to calculate where this 3D data would create shadow in a material, in displacement mapping to displace the actual geometric position of points over the textured surface, or for terrain where the heightmap is converted into a 3D mesh.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displacement_mapping
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heightmap


The process in Photoshop would be called displacement mapping. The map used in this process is called either a height map or a displacement map.

Unless you have other information which falsifies the above?
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herbert wegen

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And good to know height maps/displacement maps in Photoshop can now be 1024px. Which is still too low - it would be great if the user could decide the size themselves.
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Chris Cox

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Height Map and Depth Map are interchangeable.
Z buffer depth map (or Z depth map) is probably what you are thinking of.

Photoshop is not displacing an existing mesh, but creating a new mesh with heights determined by grayscale values.

Yes, I want the mesh size higher, but need other refactoring to get finished before that will be practical.
I have all the notes in place to make several improvements in that area, but have to wait on others.
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herbert wegen

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Okay, sounds good. Thanks for your efforts!

As far as the terminology goes: not important. As long as everyone understands what it does. Although I have never seen "depth map" used in the literature or conversations with anyone working in 3d as being a height map. I would still be interested in which literature that term is used (just curious).
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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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Always nice to get a hint of developments/improvements being worked on at the Photoshop team. 
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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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No argument that dedicated, professional 3D software should be able to produce better results than Photoshop.