Photoshop CC 2014 - photoshop jpg unreasonably large

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 3 years ago
500x500 pxs file, sRGB, 8bit saved as jpg - results in 2.8MB (should be about 200KB or so). Same size jpg is being generated from 320x50 pxs, sRGB, 8bit file.

Can't figure out why. The work around is flattening the file, duplicating the layer into a new document, then saving it as jpg. Something is being saved with the file besides the pixel data.

Anyone can solve the mystery?
Photo of Roman_the_Finisher

Roman_the_Finisher

  • 30 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
  • excited to learn something new!

Posted 3 years ago

  • 1
Photo of Chris Cox

Chris Cox

  • 20280 Posts
  • 768 Reply Likes
Try using SaveForWeb. Most likely you have a huge amount of metadata being saved with your document (like history that you set Photoshop to record for each document). SaveForWeb will not include most of the extra metadata from the document when saving. And yes, most documents do have quite a bit of metadata in addition to pixel data - more so if you set the application to record extra metadata.

And double check the actual size of the document -- It is also possible that you confused the units when creating the file (inches instead of pixels).
Photo of Roman_the_Finisher

Roman_the_Finisher

  • 30 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thanks Chris. Is there a way to remove the 'extras' like metadata without having the file saved-for-web?

Further, could the 'extra' information like metadata be transferred from one file to another just by using - select all - copy and paste the image into a new document?? This is exactly what happened when I tried to solve my file size dilemma.
Photo of Chris Cox

Chris Cox

  • 20280 Posts
  • 767 Reply Likes
No, because Save As tries to save all the information possible.
SaveForWeb exists to save the image as small as possible, and allows you to include or exclude metadata.

No, most of the metadata will not follow a copy/paste operation. In that case you should look at the document size and make sure you didn't confuse physical units (inches, centimeters) with pixels.