Now looking for alternatives to Photoshop.

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I agree with you... Photoshop CC is an absolute disaster!
Now looking for alternatives.
Do you know any.
I start to hate Photoshop as much as I hate Acrobat.
Adobe has converted itself in a Money machine that sales Bugs at gold prices.
So much hours of learning to end fighting bugs.
That a very bad deal...
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Jehan Legac

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Posted 11 months ago

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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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I agree with you... Photoshop CC is an absolute disaster!
Who is this »you«? 

I have been working with Photoshop professionally for a long time and while I am aware of Photoshop bugs (probably far from all of them naturally) I disagree with your assessment. 

As for alternatives – I have not tried most of them but I am aware that alternatives exist, for example 
• Gimp 
• Photoline 
• Affinity Photo 
It seems Affinity Photo has been marketed fairly aggressively around its recent release and seems to offer a lot for a comparatively low prize. 

I start to hate Photoshop as much as I hate Acrobat.
Well, I do not find your statement to be quite proper on a Forum like this but I think the interface changes introduced with Acrobat DC alone would justify criticism ... which is why I continue to use Acrobat XI. 
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Jehan Legac

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"You" is the message I reply to but I guess I did something wrong.
Anyway, since I subscribed to PS, LR forums I see so many many people fighting with bugs that I feel every day more right about what I think about Adobe company.
Adobe sells bugs at gold price and it gets better (for them) every year.
I believe I will soon be done with this company and will stop paying these monthly fees they charge.
Thank you very much for this 3 alternatives you offered me today. I do appreciate and will go visit today :-)
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Cristen Gillespie

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Don't leave off Acorn and On1Photo Raw. Acorn has been around forever, but that's one I've never tried. It does seem to be fairly mature, though. I own On1 Photo 10, not Raw, and may upgrade someday. Since I like Camera Raw, I'm in no hurry to use another raw developer. But I like On1 Photo 10 as an adjunct to PS, and the Photo Raw looks pretty decent, although it uses a browser, not a catalog, so no offline browsing.  Most don't offer any image management of any kind, so you want to take that into consideration as well, particularly if you have a lot of photos and other assets.

Everyone has different uses, but while you read about bugs all the time here, that's in part because this is the place to bring them to Adobe's attention. Not all reported bugs are bugs, and those that likely are, often only show up on some computers, not all, making it very difficult for Adobe to find and fix. I think they do tend to make their software serviceable to most most of the time, though, even if not always the most optimized or best design.

However, having looked around a good deal over the years, I still find they are the most complete for image editing. I haven't found any of the other apps handle the features I use regularly, including 3rd party extensions and plug-ins that they provide access to.

So for me, anyway, and I would guess a good many others, it's not all about fixing every little bug, even though we want that, anymore than it's about adding every feature, big and small, that we think would be nice to have. It's still about supporting a workflow that no one else offers. Not important to anyone who doesn't use the workflows only Adobe supports, but please don't think that those of us who do are just suckers that the company is ripping off.

That said, I genuinely hope Adobe also has its eye on the competition, because some of it is doing some very good work, even if today they are still limited, and my preference is for Adobe to continue to be the leader, out in front when it comes to providing the most flexibility and the most extensibility.

Now I'll get back to creating some brushes for graphic design in that beast of a Brush panel they offer. Definitely not the most user-friendly brush design dialog, but it rewards patience by creating brushes that other apps can't do along with doing all the other things you might want to do—and that's kind of the thing about Adobe Photoshop. It's a mixed bag, but it's a bigger bag.
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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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Not all reported bugs are bugs
Also some of what people consider to be Photoshop bugs can be OS or driver bugs ... the distinction may be hard to appreciate if Photoshop is the only application in which the bugs become evident, but it is pertinent nonetheless.
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Jehan Legac

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If Windows is the OS, I might be agree with you.
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Jehan Legac

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Thank you for passing this information (Don't leave off Acorn and On1Photo Raw), I am now downloading and will try them both to check if they are this buggy as Adobe's one :-)
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Cristen Gillespie

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I forgot to mention DXO's Optic Pro. I've tried that fairly recently, and it's a very good app, very professionally created. I'd rank it up there with Affinity and appears to have a similar emphasis (and personally I'd put Gimp on the bottom of the list).  Apart from Gimp, I'd say these are all very good competitors to Lightroom and/or Photoshop Elements. Their feature set is more limited to manipulating photos than compositing and other graphic design workflows, so they don't (yet) directly compete that much with Photoshop. But they don't entirely restrict compositing and some design, either. Affinity is starting to take on Photoshop more directly with a combination of its two apps—Design and Photo.

Other than On1, however, I've only looked at these, so I couldn't comment on how bug-proof they are.
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Jehan Legac

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That is great... Now I have a lot to do for the next week-end in trying all of these.
Thanks a lot :-)
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Cristen Gillespie

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LOL. Yes, you do have your work cut out for you. All the interfaces are different from PS and different from each other. I would suggest YouTube videos to help you evaluate more quickly. Then you can spend less time figuring out where features are and more time using the apps to do something real in order to expose any bugs or limitations to your workflow.
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Jehan Legac

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Good idea to use Youtube to overview all options :-)
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Ivan Kuckir

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If you would like to keep working with your existing PSD files, Photopea has probably the best support for PSDs (of all currently existing non-Adobe programs).
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Cristen Gillespie

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>  Photopea has probably the best support for PSDs >

I looked and it's apparently online only. How does that work? I would expect it not to be all that responsive with multi-layer files.

Also, what is "best support?" I know On1 and Affinity Photo both open and save PSDs. Are you saying it retains all the layers, knows what to do with Smart Objects or Shape layers, for example? Or is its main advantage that you can save the file as a PSD? If you've gone off Photoshop, I'm not sure why saving it as a PSD over TIFF would be an advantage, but I'm prepared to be enlightened.