Noise control - why does it not work?

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  • Updated 9 months ago
I am opening a .jpg with camera-raw of elements 18 because edited stills are saved in .jpg, this one needed a second pse-round. I correct the noise of the picture until it suits. No matter which button I press, when continuing the editing in pse, the picture is noisy again. When reopening the still in camera raw again, noise is gone.
Two solutions, that might be possible:
1 Adobe meant Camera Raw to be the new .jpg-Viewer.
2 I am too stupid to understand, why I indeed want to see the noisy version of my still.

I paid money for the software. I can't handle the product.
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En Schwers

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  • massively cheated by Adobe for getting a lously product for the money I earn when going to work

Posted 9 months ago

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Michel BRETECHER, Champion

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Just curious, which buttons did you press? 'Done', 'Open' or 'Save'?

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En Schwers

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I tried all. I first tried "open" to keep on editing.
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Steve Lehman

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Hey there En,  

Could be you need to convert your RAW to TIFF first before you edit and save.  It needs to be converted with a DNG converter from RAW to TIFF. It's free and downloads in less than a minute.  If you edited it then save in JPG could be you compressed it too much.  Keep it in RAW (same as TIFF.  (see third paragraph below for that explanation)  

Understand this:  In your camera it is RAW as 16 bit (compressed).  Then when you convert from RAW to TIFF it changes to an uncompressed 8 bit TIFF file so all of its parts are intact to edit.  Then you can edit it.  Your problem is, you are doing your editing in the camera maybe before yu get it to Elements.  Don't edit until you have concerted it.  

If you edit in JPG you run the chance of it staying compressed, then save, then compressed further than the last time, then saved again and compressed again (into "noise") and each time it's compressing it is compressed up to 80%.  That's a lot of pixels being tossed out of it.  Keep it uncompressed (all of it's pixels at once) before you edit and it will be saved with all of its parts intact in TIFF formatted files.  See the middle paragraph for RAW info.  

You're doing this backward.  Don't edit before Elements.  You are trying to get your a JPG file into Elements to edit.  That's wrong.  Get your RAW converter to TIFF using DNG and do NOT use a JPG to edit.  Edit a TIFF and it won't go to "noise".  

DNG converter LINK:  (for Windows or Mac, select either then download)
https://www.techspot.com/downloads/5368-adobe-dng-converter.html  

Steve Lehman, Windows mcse.  



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Michel BRETECHER, Champion

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1 Adobe meant Camera Raw to be the new .jpg-Viewer.

Good one... and it's true that you can consider the ACR module in Elements as ALSO a jpeg  (and other formats) viewer.
Answering your question would need detailed explanations about raw conversion, parametric editing, limitations of the ACR module in Elements, so excuse me if I am very schematic.

The fourth button in the ACR dialog is for online help and I suppose you have already had a look at that resource. The 'Save' button is misleading, it's a conversion tool to the DNG raw format, you should forget it for the present discussion.

So, you are left with two buttons, 'Done' and 'Open'.
To begin with, the ACR module is primarily used to 'convert' and 'edit' raw files.
- Raw file conversion implies reading the raw data from your sensor and creating an image format useable by pixel editors like PS and PSE. 
- Raw data is NEVER changed, you can't change it, so the 'converter' offers various tools to 'edit' the converted file, for white balance, contrast, noise or cropping... This kind of 'parametric' edit is a 'recipe' to tell how you want to edit (similar to an 'action'). This way, the raw original is never changed (it's non-destructive). That's what you see in the ACR window until you decide to save your edits (button 'Done) or even open the result in the editor (button 'Open').  Many advantages since you don't need to create and store a resulting file on your computer. That's the way Lightroom works as well as the ACR module. In Elements, you have to 'Open' in the editor to further enhance the image, to print, to save in your preferred format.
- In don't know why you have chosen to open jpegs (non raws) in ACR, but there are excellent reasons to do so. Yes, ACR can deal with jpegs (or tiffs, psds..) as well as raws, by skipping the conversion stage and keeping the parametric editing (the sliders settings). Same workflow you are used to with raws, parametric and non-destructive editing, more powerful tools, ability to process flexibly batches of jpegs with similar settings.
- The 'Done' button saves the settings of your sliders. Where? in a descriptive section of the jpeg beside your pixels values, the 'metadata' section. It's only a piece of text, it does not add significant size to your originals. Third party editors or viewers ignore that part and can only show the original. The ACR dialog lets you see the final image or it can revert to show the original. Once you open the file in Elements editor or display it in the organizer, the parametric editing is recognized.
- The 'Open' button does the same, plus it opens the resulting image file directly in RAM, without creating an intermediate tiff or psd image file. It's necessary to print, save and continue with traditional pixel editing and layers. If you add ulterior editing, the saved result (in jpeg or any other format) will ignore the original parametric recipe : it's a new independent version which has lost the recipe and with changed pixels. Generally, that version is saved in a version set with the original jpeg in the catalog.

If you want to play with test images, try some kinds of edits which are more obvious than noise, such as cropping or desaturating.


(Edited)