Lightroom 4: Nikon D600 colour moire, edge fringing and blocked shadows with 4.2 and 4.3RC

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I've noticed that colour moire in fabrics is easily triggered in Nikon D600 files developed from RAW and that there's a strange type of alternating green and purple fringing in high contrast transitions that is often visible. Finally, there's a bit of posterization when pushing shadows and often these will be blocked and will not open as well as the sensor's pedigree would suggest. There's also a tendency for shadows to turn purple as you move the sliders to the right. I used a Sony A900 until recently, the files of which, developed through LR3, looked better at base ISO, with less artifacts and moire.

My questions are:
- Is anyone else aware of these problems?
- Could resistance to moire be improved by refining RAW development in a future version of LR?
- Is this alternating green and magenta fringing something that can be eliminated in LR?
- And can LR shadow development be improved for this specific sensor?

Hope Adobe Photoshop team reads this. Any constructive replies/ideas welcome. Can provide crops. Thanks.
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Miguel Faleiro

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Posted 6 years ago

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Robert Olepa

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I have Miguel. In fact, I did a google search on it to see if I was the only one having the issue - which is how I found your thread. I got the camera the first part of November, and the first time I really used it was for a Madonna concert on the 8th. Just like you - lots of purple fringe and purple shadows. This is my first full frame camera, so I wasn't sure if it was my Nikon 50 f/1.4D that was causing the problem or the D600. I never have had a single instance of fringing with my D300s.
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Robert Olepa

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Oh. They appear in Photo Mechanic as well.
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Miguel Faleiro

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I've now contacted Nikon too and was told that they tried to get the balance right between resolution and moire filtering, but that the anti-aliasing filter in the D600 is designed for resolution with the slight risk of moire. The D600 certainly carries more resolving power than the Sony A900 for a similar pixel count. The green and magenta pattern that you sometimes get along edges is, I was told, a manifestation of moire. It's basically a question of whether one can live with this or not - I certainly can, although I'm also looking at the D800, as it might be better in this respect.

Re blocked shadows and the like, I'm still investigating, but I believe that it's due to a combination of using Live View for extended periods (which seems to degrade image quality) and Lightroom development of D600 RAWs, which, in my view, could still be improved.
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BRITT STOKES

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My first studio portrait with an employee in a dress-code mandated "smock" shows significant moire in the smock fabric. The dress she wore under it shows no moire at all. The moire slider in Lightroom 4.3's adjustment brush doesn't seem to do much, but I may not yet be using it correctly... looking for a tutorial on this. I haven't seen moire this bad since film. This portrait was shot with the Nikkor 85mm f/1.8 AF and is super sharp.