Photoshop: How do I turn an image into a Neon Sign

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I'm trying to make an image of a Blue Jay into a neon sign my account icons. I've looked up a lot of tutorials on YouTube. All of the tutorials are either only about making the sign with text or not good quality. Here the image I want to make in a neon sign
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ThatJay

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Posted 4 weeks ago

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Cristen Gillespie

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Just a few thoughts. Have you tried using Glowing Edges in the Filter Gallery? You could then use a Color Overlay layer style, perhaps first converting to B&W, though that might not be necessary. Then use an Outer Glow on a duplicate rasterized layer, or perhaps some blur to push the color beyond the lines? You wouldn't want to overdo it, but the glow surrounding the lines is what makes it "neon."

This isn't something I would normally do, but I would think if you played around a bit with some of the basic filters, you should be able to make the bird into some glowing lines that are recognizably still a bird.
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Max Johnson, Champion

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I don't know of a way to just make a picture into a neon sign. There's going to be some manual work involved. The tutorials you mentioned that applied to text only would work if you managed to get some thick strokes in the shape of a bird and apply those steps to that instead.
You could try what Cristen suggested above with the Find Edges filter and then make some shapes with the pen tool that have a thick, round end stroke or paint in with the pencil tool? Then do all the neon effects to that.
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Cristen Gillespie

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> above with the Find Edges filter and then make some shapes with the pen tool that have a thick, round end stroke or paint in with the pencil tool? Then do all the neon effects to that.>

Yes, it would probably  be more recognizably a bird, with the right amount of detail within it,  if you created those strokes yourself, which is the way Bert Monroy starts his famous neon signs. It takes longer, but the results are superior, proving computers can't really see what we see.  '-}