Photoshop: macOS filename conventions not fully supported

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  • Updated 6 days ago
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I have given some old photos long file names taken from the source online library website.  The MacOS Mojave operating system is happy to accept names such as this:
"Four young ladies v2, Duryea, Townsend, c. 1870, Photograph, PRG 1642/55/32.tif"

I restored an image and tried to SAVE AS a jpg. Photoshop errors and says unsupported character in the file name?  If I save as a simple name such as pic.jpg it works, obviously. I then renamed the new file in Finder. As an experiment I tried again to export the modified tif as a jpg and used the long name and this time Photoshop asked do I want to overwrite the existing file, but the same error occurred after the usual popup options.

"Four young ladies v2, Duryea, Townsend, c. 1870, Photograph, PRG 1642/55/32.jpg"

I assume the forward slash is the culprit?  Adobe Photoshop should be capable of using any character that the operating system will accept as valid.  Now, how do I get this info to an Adobe engineer rather than we bunch of users of Photoshop?


I am using Adobe Photoshop CC  20.0.5 for Apple MacOS.



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Steve Swayne

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Posted 1 week ago

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C gjerde

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Comma may also be a problem. Can you use - instead?
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Steve Swayne

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Yes I could but the point is apps in the MacOS environment, especially high end apps such as Photoshop should adhere precisely with the operating system acceptable file name characters.  It is not rocket science, a few lines of code to verify with each OS release. Adobe I am sure get the Betas from Apple like all the other developers...
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JEA

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OS X: Cross-platform filename best practices and conventions

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202808


Photoshop is probably doing that to avoid problems with other operating systems like windows.
(Edited)
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Steve Swayne

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The code for operating system integration is completely different for Windows and MacOS.  Overlap problems are highly unlikely if they are doing their jobs properly.
But, I do get the point re using less problematic file names :)
(Edited)
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Yves Crausaz

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And for example, if you want to classify your files on a NAS or on a file server, probably all these signs will not be accepted ...
Just as you want to transmit to someone working on windows with a a simple USB key .... It will not be able to read your files.
You've got a big bowl of macOS and go   Windows .... You just can not copy your files without renaming them .... .
Etc ...
So follow the rules and use common file lengths and characters so that future exploitation of these files is easy.

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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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I assume the forward slash is the culprit?  
Certainly. 
And I for one consider it an impropriety on MacIntosh’s side to even allow slashes in file- and folder-names, because assuming a file will never be used on another platform seems unjustifiable to me. 

Edit: The dot in the filename (for the abbreviated »circa«) seems like another imprudent choice to me. 
(Edited)
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Steve Swayne

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You know for something as fundamental as file and folder naming conventions why oh why is there no universal convention all operating system developers agree upon, similar to DVD diameter, USB standards etc. This stupid corporate rivalry thing is pretty naff.

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Roland

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Pretty sure it's a character, Ps does generally not accept, such as :;, and the blank. As far as I am aware or it, Adobe uses its own "Save file" code instead of operating systems API - probably to ensure file name compatibility between Windows and macOS. This could have also been done by writing an OO derived "Save (as)..." of the original API "Save (as)..." - function, but to my guts it feels (of course this can be wrong too), they have unfortunately been inventing the wheel from the scratch.