LightRoom is not a productive tool anymore

  • 1
  • Problem
  • Updated 4 years ago
  • (Edited)
i'm very very disappointed with lightroom 5. i'm running a monster windows 8.1 pro PC with 12 cores, a nvidia 770, 64GB ram, one raid 0 SSD setup for my work data an extra ssd for the system and an other ssd for cache data. and my lightroom catalog (for every job an extra catalog) is located on a 40GB RAM disk! but i feel like using a commodore 64. i will install lightroom 4 again cause it's more stable and remarkable faster!

i don't know how you can publish a software with so many problems. with maximum 4000 photos the switch between two photos takes around 2-3 seconds. if i'm zooming in it takes a second. of course i use smart previews and a 1:1 preview with 2880px.

so could you please do your job and make programs faster, more stable and just better?

let's hope there will be an update sooner or later for now i stick with LR 4 even with my CC membership.
Photo of simonanhorn

simonanhorn

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 4 years ago

  • 1
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2643 Posts
  • 337 Reply Likes
I have seen some others complain about slow performance with LR on a system with fast disks and lots of memory. Have you looked in Task Manager or Resource Monitor to see what might be the bottleneck, if anything? Have you tried monitoring LR with SystemInternals' Process Monitor to see if there are any errors being generated?
Photo of simonanhorn

simonanhorn

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
hey steve,

i'm always checking the task manager and resource monitor. nothing suspicious occurs. CPU is at max 10% (even if I export images the cpu is not going higher than 30-40%) the disks are also not busy. where can I see errors in Process Monitor?
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2643 Posts
  • 337 Reply Likes
If the CPU isn't busy, then something else is the bottle-neck. Do you have a pagefile allocated? I'd guess RAM or VRAM or maybe the I/O system is the bottleneck, since there are no physical disk operations to cause disk delays that let other things catch up. Do you have very fast RAM? You can use CPU-Z to see what the CAS Latency is and compare that with high-performance ram for sale to see if that is optimal.

In Process Monitor you'd want to filter by the LR process, and watch what is happening, to see if any of the file I/o operations are being retried due to errors. At least that is something I've seen happen, where something is interfering with fast-I/O and it is falling back to a slower I/O method.

I don't have a recommendation on seeing how busy the RAM or I/O systems are, although you might find some utilities, here, useful, besides CPU-Z:
http://www.cpuid.com/