Lightroom: LR4.3 Slow in Develop Mode on retina display Macbook

  • 5
  • Problem
  • Updated 6 years ago
  • (Edited)
The 4.3 beta is slower for me in the develop mode....adjustments on sliders are slow to change and the image is slow to take on the changes made. However the images do open up fast in the develop mode and does seem to be a little faster than 4.2 (which was very responsive in all areas). I am using a 15" macbook pro retina.
Photo of Az Rehman

Az Rehman

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 6 years ago

  • 5
Photo of félix martineau

félix martineau

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
4,2 was much faster than 4,1 however, the 4,3 release candidate that integrates the support for retina display is really really slow. Event with i7, 16Go of ram and SSD it's very long before the image gets to be clear on the screen and the mouse is lagging. I can't imagine people with more basic computers!! I would expect the software to be sharp and responsive with the hardware I have. I have been using Lightroom for more than 3years now but I really consider switching to aperture since the new versions are not meeting my expectations... Do you plan on solving does problems in a near future ??

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Lightroom: 4.3RC slow on retina Macbook.
Photo of Steven Bisig

Steven Bisig

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Same here.

Made the mistake of upgrading to 4.3 right before my NCAA football assignment. Development mode is extremely slow when cropping and making minor slider adjustments. I even tried to render 1:1 and no change. Even cleared cache files.

Running LR 4.3 on MacBook retina with 16GB of ram.

HELP!
Photo of Becky Sowada

Becky Sowada, Adobe Employee

  • 508 Posts
  • 105 Reply Likes
To help us investigate the issue, I'd like to get more information:

1) Export a catalog with a set of slow images (small catalog is fine). This will ensure we see the same settings you are using.

2) Screenshot of your Develop setup (or even better, a video). This ensures we are sizing the image similar to your setup.

You can send via a utility like Dropbox or yousendit.com, just post a link to the files back in this thread.

Thanks,
Becky
Photo of Steven Bisig

Steven Bisig

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Already downgraded back to 4.2 to finish my work. Had a lot of images from NCAA & NFL football games to edit.
Photo of Robert Peters

Robert Peters

  • 39 Posts
  • 15 Reply Likes
What I still see in 4.3RC1 is confusing as ever.

OS X 10.8.2
MacBook Pro (15 inch retina)
2.6 GHz, quad-core i7
8 GB RAM
512 GB SSD

Nikon D800 NEF files (~32.5 MB, 7360 x 4912 pixels)

All 1:1 previews calculated before any "measurements". Times (as shown in the Acvity Monitor application) are from the start of any CPU activity until activity ceases. Zoom to 1:1 several times at each stage in order to populate any caches.

Library Loupe view
zoom to 1: ~7 1/2 sec

Library Grid view
zoom to 1: ~4 sec

Why is this operation faster from Grid view?

Develop
zoom to 1:1 ~1 sec

Why is this operation faster in the Develop module than in the Library module?

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Lightroom: 4.3RC1 slow 1:1 zoom in Library.
Photo of Steven Bisig

Steven Bisig

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Made the mistake of upgrading to 4.3 right before my NCAA football assignment. Development mode is extremely slow when cropping and making minor slider adjustments. I even tried to render 1:1 and no change. Even cleared cache files.

Running LR 4.3 on MacBook retina with 16GB of ram.

HELP!

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
LR4.3 SLOWWWW on MacBook Pro Retina with 16GB of RAM.
Photo of jdv

jdv, Champion

  • 728 Posts
  • 56 Reply Likes
Just use 4.2. 4.3 was installed parallel to the official release of 4.2. 4.3 is a release candidate -- you don't have to use it.
Photo of Steve Sprengel

Steve Sprengel, Champion

  • 2657 Posts
  • 341 Reply Likes
To get your work done, you should be able to uninstall 4.3 and re-install 4.2 from http://www.adobe.com/downloads/updates/
Photo of Steven Bisig

Steven Bisig

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Already downgraded back to 4.2 to finish my work. Had a lot of images from NCAA & NFL football games to edit.
Photo of Lee Jay

Lee Jay

  • 990 Posts
  • 136 Reply Likes
Why isn't this caused simply by the fact that there are now 4 times as many pixels to render?
Photo of michael laurenzano

michael laurenzano

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
I have the same setup as Robert Peters. Same Mac and camera. Just finished and job. This added 10 hours to my post. GRRRRRRRRR
Photo of yourfavorite

yourfavorite

  • 5 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Geeze, I can't imagine if I used LR for a living. Just editing some photos from vacation and noticed a huge slow after upgrading to 4.3. I thought I was going crazy or perhaps something was wrong with my rmbp. Downgraded to 4.2 and things are running much smoother. Is the higher pixel density on the interface really the cause of such a noticeable speed decrease?
Photo of Robert Peters

Robert Peters

  • 39 Posts
  • 15 Reply Likes
Yourfavorite,

Mak certain your monitor profile is icc v2 Matrix and not a LUT.
Photo of David Hayes

David Hayes

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
I upgraded last night to 4.3 on my rMBP, and suffered the same slowness. What I found to continue using 4.3 was to open the Application Info in the finder, and enable Low Resolution. It would appear the higher pixel density is really a killer here, but I am clothed to even think about Aperture.
Photo of David Hayes

David Hayes

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
loathed, not clothed
Photo of Robert Peters

Robert Peters

  • 39 Posts
  • 15 Reply Likes
David Hayes,

What do you mean by "open the Application Info in the finder, and enable Low Resolution"?
Photo of David Hayes

David Hayes

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Open your Finder, then Applications. Right or two finger click on Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 and Get Info. There is an option "Open in Low Resolution". Select that, and close the info window down.

The next time you open up LR4.3, it'll render faster, but not support HDPI.
Photo of Robert Peters

Robert Peters

  • 39 Posts
  • 15 Reply Likes
Thanks. I was looking at Lightroom 4.3 on a MacPro.

HIDPI is worth it to me, even with D800 NEF files.
Photo of David Hayes

David Hayes

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
My workflow is quite time sensitive, shooting and processing on the night, so losing the HiDPI is not such a problem for me. For wedding shoots, I can always switch to HiDPI mode.
Photo of David Hayes

David Hayes

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
As a programmer, I know I'm going to hate myself for saying this, but why can't it just..... :-)

Suggestion - For Retina displays - when adjusting the sliders in Develop mode, or applying a preset, show a lower resolution (the equivalent of what would be shown at the pretend resolution), and when the sliders haven't been adjusted for a short period of time (say 1 second, but ideal to have this user configurable), render the high resolution version of the image.
Photo of Lee Jay

Lee Jay

  • 990 Posts
  • 136 Reply Likes
That behavior was in LR 1. It's called "pixel doubling" and I loved it, but there were so many complaints that they removed it.