Lightroom: If increasing the contrast slider causes dark tone clipping, are we then supposed to increase blacks slider to compensate?

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When I say increase blacks I'm meaning positive blacks i.e +10 etc thus unclipping the clipped blacks. Is it the correct way to do things?

PS Lightroom 4 (process 2012)
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Paul Beckwith

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Posted 4 years ago

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Rikk Flohr, Official Rep

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Supposed to?
That depends.

Is there really a black object in your shot? Does it look better if you keep the black channel plugged? In those cases you aren't 'supposed' to do anything.

If you don't want the blacks clipped after adjusting contrast and you are happy with exposure, you can push shadows brighter or the blacks to the right. Those are choices based upon image appearance and content and without your image and your artistic slant, it is hard to advise you what is the course you need to take?
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Paul Beckwith

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Makes sense. Thank you for your advice. Appreciated. I've been using Lightroom for 4 years now, yet still learn new/better techniques all the time. Ty
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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In LR 5 you can shift-double-click on the Blacks slider and it'll auto-adjust the black point based on what the current image settings.
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Paul Beckwith

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I've only got Lightroom 4 ATM. I decided to wait until the next process version until I upgraded or if version 4 becomes incompatible with a new version of Windows that comes out (I currently have Windows 8 and it runs very well) .
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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I mentioned the additional capability of LR5 because you have LR4, yes.

A new PV is added when there is a new version of a feature the replaces the old version of the feature--i.e. toning having a different set of sliders between 2012 and 2010/2003. A PV isn't changed if the features or capabilities are merely being added.

LR 5 has new features like: Uprights and the Radial Filter, and additions to existing features like: irregular healing/cloning areas, visualize-spots, color smoothness adjustment in noise-reduction, double-clicking on the Whites and Blacks sliders to auto-adjust based on the current image settings, and a few more things, none of which replaced old versions of themselves, so a new PV wasn't needed:
https://helpx.adobe.com/lightroom/hel...

I find it interesting that you're arbitrarily waiting for a new PV before you upgrade, rather than upgrading to benefit from new features or additional capabilities of existing features.

Personally, I use Uprights, the Radial Filter and the irregular clone/heal shape spotting, and the double-clicking to set White and Black points quite a bit.

I don't know anything about new features of LR 6 that should be out in a few months, or whether Adobe has replaced an existing feature so will require a new PV, but Adobe has said there will only be 64-bit versions from 6 onward so that may be another consideration for you:
http://blogs.adobe.com/lightroomjourn...

The other thing to think about, is the added capabilities of having Photoshop CC for added processing.

Being the week before Valentine's Day, this afternoon I'm doing close-up photography of a ring, and have taken three shots: one where the front facets of the jewel are in focus, one where the side jewels are in focus, and one focused where the band enters the display box. Using LR to open the three images as layers, Photoshop can align and stack them, masking to reveal only the sharpest areas of each, and achieve a much deeper apparent depth of field. I was hand-holding the camera so there is a bit of movement from one to the next as I adjusted the focus, but the stack is almost perfect because Photoshop can adjust for changes in rotation, position and size during alignment. A focus stack is much clearer than having used f/36 with a single shot because small apertures increase diffraction blur.

So, I am glad I have the Photography Plan for $10/month that gives me the current versions of LR (5 now, and 6 in a few months) and Photoshop for use when I need it. I still have my perpetual license for LR 5 in case I ever want to cancel the CC plan and merely upgrade to the newest LR at some point.
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Paul Beckwith

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Steve thanks for the detailed follow up. I'm actually very happy with LR4 but you do make some very good points that are well worth considering and temping. Ty
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Paul Beckwith

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A further question on the subject:

I've noticed Adobe Standard in it's starting point, has a lot more black clipping for my camera than say compared to 'Camera Neutral/Standard etc. Using the contrast slider pushes a lot more tones into black clipping too. It's really noticable if i instead use Camera Neutral etc to compare and notice hardly any black clipping.

I would prefer to use Adobe Standard.

Is there a reasoning behind this? Is this common for Adobe Standard for all cameras? Is there a technique used to counter this?

ps my camera atm is just a Nikon D3100