Photoshop: Is there a way to lock the center point at a desired place while transforming an object?

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Is there anyway to lock the center point at a desired place while transforming an object? It keeps moving to the center, every time I try to transfer the same object.
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RazmikM

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Posted 8 years ago

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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Official Response
Hold down the Alt (windows) or Option (Mac) key when transforming an object by dragging the resize handles.

If transforming numerically, make sure that the center point is selected in the "Reference Point location" control:

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RazmikM

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Thanks Jeffrey, that was a great hint; however, what I need to do is to lock the center point permanently. What I mean, is anytime I go back to transfer an object. the center point is placed the same place since my last transform. Any idea?
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miabells

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I'm looking for something similar - I create fractal images by resizing and rotating shapes as new layers.

I want to lock the center point, OUTSIDE of the shape-to-be-transformed (NOT one of the reference points), on a specific point in the document which is specified by the intersection of a horizontal and vertical guide in the dead center of the document. Seems to me that there should be a "snap" option, so that the "center" rotational point of a shape can snap precisely to another point outside of the shape.

Right now, I have to drag and drop the rotational point from the shape to the point where the guides intersect, as close as I can get it, then zoom in. When I zoom in, it's obvious that I was WAY off, because the rotation point is an inch away from the intersection point. Now I zoom in ALL the way to the pixels, and then move the center point again, but still, because it does not snap, I know that it's an imperfect placement. If it was possible to zoom in more, this would be apparent. This is tedious and imprecise. This means that the rotation I will complete of my shape will not be mathematically perfect, and will throw off the algorithm that I want to graphically represent.

Am I missing something crucial here, and this feature already exists? Please let me know! Thanks :)
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Michael Grassmyer

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One semi-workaround is to make it a smart object then apply a puppet warp to it and add a pin where you want it to rotate around and another pin somewhere on it convenient for the desired rotation. The smart object saves the puppet warp's state. Not very accurate so might not help in the fractals situation but might be useful to someone.
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Douglas Veltz

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See if this helps. It is all explained in the image, Let me know if you have any questions. I came here looking for this same information and was unable to use the solutions mentioned so I went back and developed a pretty effective workaround.
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Douglas Veltz

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...and if you are wondering why there are two STEP 5s,,,
...it is because I am a moron.
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cliffclof

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That is a great tip; wonder why Adobe Photoshop Team doesn't add the necessary code to allow layers to store anchor points? I also need this especially when working with animated layers.
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Carson Barnes

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I think this is an example of an "improvement" that improves nothing, it's just novelty and variety for its own sake.  Correct me if there's a reason that the center point doesn't show and doesn't show by default when doing scale or rotate transformations.  I used it all the time and have kept CC2018 as it shows by default, sometimes saving my work, closing CC2019 and reopening in CC2018.  Thank you however for advising how to move the center axis.  I use it all the time.