Lightroom: apply Picture Profile relative to setting stored in raw (Neutral = Canon Neutral)

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I often import photos taken with different picture profiles. First time I used Adobe Default, but it produces horrible colors in most cases. Applying one certain PP to all files on import causes wrong color representation too. Why can't Lightroom apply native PP to every raw I import depending on PP I took it with?

P.S. Even with "native" Canon (Nikon) -like profiles I get wrong colors in comperation with in-camera jpg. What's wrong, why can't you give us exact colors??
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Andrew Orlow

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Posted 5 years ago

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Rob Cole

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My advice: Forget about setting picture profile in camera (or better still: always shoot with reduced contrast neutral).

One of the joys of shooting raw, in my opinion, is that you can forget about all camera settings except basic exposure, and concentrate on getting the shot(s) - worry about everything else in post...

If you don't like my advice, then there are (work-around) solutions now:
1. Use ExifMeta in conjunction with CollectionPreseter to set camera profile based on picture style, post-import.
2. Use Ottomanic Importer to set camera profile based on picture style during import.

(these plugins can be readily found using internet search)

Rob
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Chris Cox

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Also note that in-camera JPEG usually gives horribly saturated, highly contrasty, and inaccurate images. That is not a good thing to compare against.

Which camera model are you using that gives unacceptable color, and how are you seeing the color shift from the original scene (again, don't compare to JPEG)?
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Rob Cole

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PS - If you have manually set camera calibration to camera-matching profile, and the colors are still off (relative to jpeg), then these are possible reasons:

1. Adobe's profiles are off.
2. There are other settings applied by camera, but not by Lightroom, which are causing differences - e.g. intelligent exposure/contrast handling.
(see last paragraph below for a 3rd reason)

Note: I agree with Chris that it is good to wean oneself from the look of the in-camera jpeg, and simply learn to make images look how you want them to in Lightroom.

Often what seems to look best is what we are most familiar with, sometimes ya gotta rinse your palette and/or walk away for a while to see clearly...

More advice: once you gain sufficient confidence, stop looking at the jpegs completely.

Note: for the record, Adobe's profiles, even if done "perfectly", will never match camera exactly, due to inherent differences in underlying algorithms, which include tonal re-distribution (e.g. auto highlight/shadow recovery).

Rob
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Andrew Orlow

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I would not agree.
First, in-camera jpeg gives result relative to choosen PP, and it's a reference point for any raw converter, because it represents how exactly PP works. And if we shot in Neutral and converter applies Standart, for instance, we'll get wrong colors in most cases.
Also tweaking colors as we like is not a solution at all, especially when we need exact color representation.
And, really, dear Adobe, if you want to know what professional really think about LR, please, please (!) take a look at
http://translate.google.com/translate...
It's a review of one of most famous russian photographer. I hope you'll be able to read translation.
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Lee Jay

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"Also tweaking colors as we like is not a solution at all, especially when we need exact color representation. "

None of the in-camera profiles will give you that, nor will Adobe Standard. If you want a colormetrically-accurate representation (most people don't, as it tends to be less visually attractive) you need to use the DNG Profile Editor to profile your camera from a standard reference.
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Rob Cole

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I think Lee Jay's advice is sound, for creating closest match to real life, except consider x-rite software too, in case you can get closer results than with DNG Profile Editor.

As far as creating closest match to jpeg, it seems there are two issues:
1. Choosing closest matching profile.
2. How close matching profile matches jpeg.

I think it would behoove you to tackle those issues separately.

I have given 2 potential solutions to #1 already.

Regarding #2, you need to either point out differences to Adobe (esp. Eric Chan) so they can improve their camera emulation profiles, or be very nice to Vit Novak, since he has created some profiles which more closely match camera jpeg than Adobe's do. Who knows, maybe he's already done one for your camera model (hint: visit Camera Raw forum).

Personally, I use profiles which don't match Adobe's, nor camera's, nor real life... ;-).

PS -
|> "it's a reference point for any raw converter"
Other than the camera manufacturer software, most raw converters have no allegiance to look of in-camera jpeg whatsoever. ACR/Lr at least has camera-matching profiles which get you close.

Good luck,
Rob