Lightroom: Panasonic G80/G85/G81 - Issue with White Balance

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  • Updated 1 year ago
  • (Edited)
I am puzzled with Lightroom's display of White Balance values for the said camera (model names are from the various geo regions).

Using the camera's WB presets, the following values are shown in
(a) Exif Maker Notes / (b) Panasonic's SW SILKYPIX / (c) Lightroom 6.10:

  • Preset "sun":          5500K / 5657K / 4850K
  • Preset "Cloud":      6300K / 6611K / 5450K
  • Preset "Shadow":  7300K / 3242K / 6000K

  • ( Preset "Bulb":         3100K / 3242K / 3100K ==> which is OK  )
Whereas for the first three presets the difference between (a) and (b) is in an acceptable range (certainly caused by the camera), and its values from the preset match the "normal" color temperatures for such situations/presets, the values shown in (c) Lightroom are way below - in a range between 700 to 1300 degrees.

When adjusting the white balance in Lightroom using a grey card, the modification is done within a range of 100-200 degrees, which is as expected, but with the result still being far below from the other (IMHO correct) value from SILKYPIX.

In contrast, with Panasonic's GH4 I do not experience such deviations.

My conclusion: there seems to be an issue with Lightroom's support for the camera in this area.
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Torsten Villnow

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Posted 1 year ago

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John Schwaller

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The wb number is not important. What you want is the ability to visually adjust the image to get the look you want.
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Torsten Villnow

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To me the WB numbers matter a lot, because I want to use both mentioned cameras (GH4 and G80) in parallel / at the same. Adjusting the then combined images could also include a  modification of the color temperature, which would be a "nightmare", when their WB numbers are so different for the same light condition.   

I worked with photos from various Canon cameras like this before in Lightroom and haven't come across such a situation.
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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Below are Canon Camera CR2 ColorChecker PP image files shot with in-camera 'Daylight'  (5200K) WB setting at high-noon on  a cloudless day (5500K).

LR 'As Shot' WB Values      CCPP WB Values (Eye dropper sample)
300D      5800 +13                 5800 +9
600D      5200 +11                 5700 +20
5D MKII 4850 +5                    5100 +10

These differences are due to camera manufacturing tolerances and perhaps WB errors made by Adobe when creating the camera profiles.

To workaround this I've change the WB Default Camera Settings in LR to the ColorChecker PP values shown above for each camera as my "starting point." I can then 'Sync' any WB corrections across the images with the same lighting since they all have the same "scene referred" WB setting. To apply the WB correction to same scene images shot with two cameras simply apply the Temp and Tint difference to the other camera's WB settings and 'Sync' it across those images. For critical work shoot a ColorChecker PP image with each camera for each different lighting condition.

Having said all that it is possible to "fix" the camera profile WB settings using the Adobe DNG Profile Editor (DPE). See page 22 here: http://wwwimages.adobe.com/content/dam/Adobe/en/products/photoshop/pdfs/cs6/DNGProfile_EditorDocumen...

This would allow using and applying the in-camera WB settings with better accuracy.
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Torsten Villnow

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The topic seems to be more complicated than assumed, especially also after having further searched for topics like "incorrect colour temperature in Lightroom" in the web. But thank you for your valuable insight and recommendations - I will have to revisit my workflow.
(Edited)
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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In-Camera (as Shot) and LR's White Balance presets (Daylight, Cloudy, Shade, etc.) are at best a gross "ballpark" guesstimate of the actual setting required for a given lighting and scene type. What you might find helpful is to shoot an inexpensive White Balance card under various lighting conditions to get a better idea of what LR WB settings are required. You can then create your own Develop Presets for specific lighting conditions that applies only Temp & Tint values. Keep in mind that scene lighting such as sunrise and sunset (warm) will look unnatural if the WB is fully corrected.  Same goes for cloudy lighting. For these types of scene lighting it's best to adjust for the most "natural appearance" and then Sync the Temp & Tint values across same scene lit images.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/909206-REG/vello_wb_cm_white_balance_card_set.html

Of course all of this WB "fine tuning" is for naught if you're using a display that hasn't been calibrated with a hardware device (i1 Display, ColorMunki, Spyder) to a proper 6500K White Point. ;>)
(Edited)
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Torsten Villnow

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The "ballpark guesstimate" has worked great so far with my Canon cameras applying eg. the daylight WB preset of Lightroom, as their WB figures, as calculated by LR, were pretty similar. But as this does not work any more with my current Panasonic cameras I will consider your advice with respect to individually measured presets. And yes, I am aware, that sunrise/sunset should be  adjusted (if needed) with a WB setting closed to daylight in order to preserve the special atmosphere.