Lightroom Classic: Not working on my laptop

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  • Updated 2 weeks ago
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I have a Lightroom installed on my laptop. Once I open it my laptop slowing down that I can't work on any of my photo and any change takes forever. When try to save a photo my laptop freeze for 20 min.
Laptop properties: Intel Core i3 2,3 GHz, RAM 4 GB, Windows 10 Home 64bit.
What can be wrong / what can I do to fix it?

Thanks
Aga
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Agnieszka Kucinska

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  • Disappointed

Posted 2 weeks ago

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Ruurd van Dijk

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Your system is at all points at the absolute minimum requirements for Lightroom Classic... I think you will have to upgrade your hardware!
https://helpx.adobe.com/lightroom-classic/system-requirements.html
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Bill

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Your hardware is completely inadequate for running powerful software. Not even close. Adobe (and most other software vendors) significantly understate their hardware requirements. Your machine is fine for browsing the web, running office software, social media.

You didn't mention whether you are running macOS or Windows but both operating systems come with free photo editing software which is much more capable than most people realize. My suggestion is that you get comfortable with one of them.

The minimum to operate, but with unacceptable performance, i5 with 8gb of RAM. Minimum for usable, but not very great performance, i7 with 16 GB of RAM. Minimum for very good performance, i7/i9/Xeon with 32 GB of RAM. And in all cases at least one large SSD that is at least 50% empty and of course a modest video card, $200-250 is fine for the card. The processor needs at least 8 threads, not one of the crippled "i" series without hyperthreading. AMD users can chime in for the equivalent AMD processors.
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Dave Grainger

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Correct. That laptop sounds like a "big box store" cheapo. It has less than half enough memory just needed for Windows, let alone a big Adobe program... You are trying to move boulders with a skateboard...

If one reads menus from right to left, one always eats hamburger.
(Edited)
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Anthony Blackett

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You need at least 16GB ram on your Windows 10 machine. LrC will not even run with 8GB without soon exhausting physical memory and having to use virtual memory (hard disc), which will cripple the computer. I had 8GB in my laptop (2 x 4GB cards) before finding out it could actually use 8GB memory cards (despite the specs stating otherwise), so now I have 16GB and it is quite usable.

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Dave Grainger

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That does't address the i3 processor , the fact that this is Home version of Windows 10 - and likely was a converted older machine that had Windows 7... I think this person would be well served to buy a new  computer.
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Bill

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True but that might not be financially viable. Especially true if a laptop is preferred as a Lightroom capable laptop will be 2-4 times the price of a desktop. 
 
Hence my recommendation to just use the free Photos app that is included with Windows. True it doesn't have the full capabilities of Lightroom but it is otherwise quite capable. It also handles every raw image I've thrown at it: Fuji, Nikon, Olympus and Panasonic. As a destructive editor, it is also fast on machines with limited capability. When saving, it offers to save as a new image so the original is not lost; like Photoshop Elements.
 
It also handles casual printing at much higher quality than Lightroom, I've yet to get a decent print on my Canon PRO-100 straight from Lightroom. I export the jpeg and then print it from Photos. I'm sure there is just a profile mismatch in Lightroom but I've given up trying to fix it.  

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Dave Grainger

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HP is trying to drum up more business and offers attractive pricing on both laptops and desktops. I have found that when I call their Business sales division and configure one, then at the end of the conversation I say "what coupons do you have on this machine right now?" that they immediately rifle through their computer and come up with much more discount. (Business department gets you a 3 year warranty as opposed to one in Consumer. All one has to do is state, IF ASKED which rarely happens, that they work from home.)

There is no appreciable difference between laptop and desktop pricing, BTW. 

 The only negative is that right now shipping times are dragging out due to trade war and virus...

This person is only looking at a relatively small total price,unless going for a MAC...
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Bill

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"There is no appreciable difference between laptop and desktop pricing, BTW."
 
Not sure what planet you live on but it isn't earth. I guess this is true if one accepts significantly reduced capability, performance and display quality from the laptop. 
 
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Dave Grainger

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Planet Earth fer sure, Bill. I have been in the computer business for forty years and deal with HP and others all the time on behalf of customers.  I do agree that a laptop is not the ideal platform for Photoshop, but a large part of sales are laptops.   From the postings on this forum I also get it that a number of younger people are trying to do Photoshop and Lightroom on tablets and phones!  We have several of both laptops and desktops in use here; my Photoshop activity is primarily on a desktop with a nice big screen!

We don't really know whether the inquiring person is a student or not and whether or not $$$ is the driving concern, but I suspect both are the case..  
(Edited)
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Bill

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I agree but that wasn't your statement. Yes a $4,000 laptop will approximate a $2,000 desktop, except for the display. Or one can pay $2,000 for a laptop with half the capability of the equivalently priced desktop. 
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Dave Grainger

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Bill: a question for you: (not on this topic) I saw your post to another person about a hawk that had been nearby that was a Raptor Rescue release.  Any chance of seeing  photos of it?   We are birders and have birdsbydave.com if you would like to see my collection.
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Bill

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I went back and added the photo. I'm not a serious birder. Your shots are vastly superior to anything I have to offer, thanks for the link. Attached is the same hawk taken 2 years earlier under an apple tree instead of a peach tree for the 1st picture. This one is cropped. 
 
I had an Olympus 50-200 with the 2X teleconverter that was primarily used for closeups of flowers with insects flying around. Because of the close focusing capabilities of this setup, even have a few nice photos of prairie dogs who walked to inches from my boots. That lens combo has been replaced with the Panasonic 100-400 which is somewhat superior optically though with less accurate AF. 
 
The Woodpecker is with a Fuji X-S1 at 624mm equivalent.
 
This is an illustration of the Lightroom export problem for Image Sizing. Chose Resize to Fit Megapixels for 2 and it was 2.8 when exported. Had to set it to 1.5 to get it under 2. Whereas choosing 2 for the hawk resulted in 1.73. Don't Enlarge was checked in both cases. Perhaps I should start a separate thread for this problem though it has existed since at least Lightroom 2. 
 

 

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Dave Grainger

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Those are good photos! Hawk might be a Coopers Hawk and woodpecker could be a Downey...

I got some prairie dogs when I lived in South Dakota for about a year. They are very comical subjects...

Insects: I use a 105 Nikkor "Micro" which is the way Nikon spells Macro lens and 1/6400th sec shutter, ISO 2,500 and stop bee wings in flight. I reduced size on this image as I ran into 2 meg limitation..
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Bill

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The hawk is a Red Tailed, as over 90% of the hawks on the east side of the Rockies seem to be. While there are several varieties of hawks in CO, the red tails are dominant. I live about 25 miles north of Denver. For the most part when it comes to bird identification, I can recognize hawk, Robin and not a hawk or Robin.

There are quite a few eagles in the area. As their nesting sites are protected with distance, it takes 2-3,000mm FF equivalent most of the time for decent shots. And I don't mean portraits but showing them in their environment. I use 133 power on a small telescope for viewing.

I'm a member of our local Audubon society chapter but they are focused on identification and counting rather than photography. Perhaps I could start a sub group if I didn't spend almost all of my free outdoor time gardening.
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Dave Grainger

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There is a list serv run by University of Washington called Tweeters that gets 95% posts by birders and 5% from birders with camera skills...
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Bill

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Must be the last list serv on the planet. Saw mentions of burrowing owls. There are a couple sites in Colorado for the patient, very patient. I have a deaf friend that I've known for 65 years. When we'd hike in a forest, I'd tell him what I was hearing and the general direction (often incorrect) and he would find it visually far more often than I would. We made quite a team. Ah the good old days.
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Dave Grainger

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My burrowing owl photos were all taken at the Salton Sea; there is a Wildlife Preserve named after Sonny Bono there, but all the owls I saw were taking advantage of soft turned earth alongside irrigation ditches...