Lightroom mobile (iOS) should support saving edits to original

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Many photo editing iOS apps support this, but Lightroom mobile does not. If I import a photo from my camera roll and apply edits inside Lightroom mobile, when I save to camera roll it should save the image to the original that I imported with with the edits applied.

Why? This will make it so when I go back to Photos app on iOS I don't have two of the same photo (one with edits and one without) and it will allow me to be able to revert the Lightroom edits and return to the original in case I wanted to do that.

With subtle edits, it can be very difficult to tell which photo is the edited photo and then delete the unedited one. This is very annoying and can easily be fixed by supporting writing edits to the original on iOS.

If you need an example of apps that do this, both snapseed and darkroom support this.
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Steve

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Posted 1 year ago

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Roelof Moorlag

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It's not a technical issue but a choice from Adobe to maintain Lightroom as non destructive to the original image. In my opinion it must be that way.
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Roelof Moorlag

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No, it's not. When you write back to an image than it's destructive. when you leave the image original and save the edits in a sidecar file or in the catalog then it's non destructive. Maybe read something about PIE ware to understand the concept.
http://www.dpbestflow.org/image-editing/parametric-image-editing
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Steve

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Sorry - I still have to disagree. Try using the other apps I mention. You'll see that they can write out the changes as adjustments that can be reverted later by the user within the photos app.

For example, shoot RAW on camera, import on iPad in photos.app, open snapseed, import that photo from camera roll, make edits, save "Save with changes you can undo". If you scroll through photos.app, you will see the photo with your edits from snapseed, you can easily go into edit and revert the changes from snapseed. Also, if you open Lightroom, the photo is still the original raw you can import and make other edits. Can't be impossible if it's already being done by other apps taking advantage of this awesome API.

Plus Lightroom is already not saving these images back to your camera roll as RAW so PIE is not so relevant. But that is completely besides the point.

Also - you can check out the documentation for Apple's APIs here: https://developer.apple.com/reference/photos

Under the section: Editing Asset Content
Use these classes in an app or extension to access asset data for editing and commit edits to the Photos library. Photos manages multiple versions of assets and adjustment data that describes each edit, so that your app or extension can allow a user to revert or continue working with edits made earlier, even on a different device.
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Steve

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I guess to best explain when you use Apple's APIs to do this correctly you're not "writing back to an image" you're saving your image as an edit to the original. It's the same concept as saving edits in the catalog, but Apple keeps the catalog information on it's end when you use the right APIs. They can know what edits were made by different editing apps on iOS. It's not like you're overwriting the image on disk.
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Roelof Moorlag

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Indeed, i'm not a developer so i don't understand quite what you are describing about Apple's API. Does it 'touch' the original file or doesn't it? For a file handling perspective, that is relevant. 
If you want edits saved in the file itself as metadata (so without compromising the RAW image data), adobe provides the DNF format.
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Steve

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Adobe already saves out the file to the camera roll as a jpg. Photos stores the original photo *always*. It has metadata to track any edits to it whether those edits are done in the photos app or in 3rd party apps. It can save all those changes as versions that can always be rolled back to the original. It will not overwrite the original, but rather add metadata and the new jpeg as an edit. So the user of the photos app can view the edit within the same item in their library. They can always revert the changes and get back to their original and more.

Don't think of these things as 'files' as they're a lot more complex than that. It's not like a file system where an image lives and if you 'touch' it the original file is gone/changed. The original file is never 'touched' or changed. You can just add more information to the object that represents that image.

Adobe mobile doesn't provide DNF back to photos. It only provides .jpg.