Lightroom Classic: Lens Profile always wrong with custom settings

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  • Updated 8 months ago
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I'm using Lightroom Classic, i've come across a problem with lens profiles.
If I copy settings from 1 image and paste it to another that was shot on a different lens it changes the profile as well.
As an example.
Image A shot on 24-70 lens. I want to change vignette in lens corrections so i do.
Copy settings
Image B shot on 135 lens, paste settings, lens corrections taken but lens is changed to 24-70.

Lens Profile corrections should never change the lens used. I don't see why this should ever be required.
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Peter Aylward

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Posted 8 months ago

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John MacLean

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Is this with raw or JPG files?
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Peter Aylward

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raw
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Tom Mickow

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What's the value of the "Setup" field in the file you're copying from?



If that's "Custom", you'll copy all those custom settings to the other image, including the lens profile.

If it's "Auto", Lr will look at the metadata of the other image and select the proper lens profile, if it's available.
(Edited)
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Peter Aylward

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Thats adding in a vignette or distortion after so its not natural as shot
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Tom Mickow

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Hmmm...every correction applied in Lr is coming after it's shot, so I'm afraid I don't understand what you're trying to say.

I think I've exhausted my ability to help with that panel, so I'll leave you be and let others chime in with any useful advice they may have.  Best of luck.
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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As Tom Mickow mentions lens profiles are not designed to be used for "creative" purposes. If you could explain in more detail exactly what you are trying to accomplish perhaps we can provide more suggestions.

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Peter Aylward

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Its not really a creative purpose. I don't want it to remove the distortion but i want to remove the vignette.

If you setting it this way and copy settings, paste to another image it changes the profile to whatever way copied. I don't see why you would ever want to copy the wrong lens profile onto an image.

The profile should be a seperate tick box to the vignette and distortion if you want to be able to copy the wrong profile onto an image
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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Its not really a creative purpose. I don't want it to remove the distortion but i want to remove the vignette.
As I see it this is a "creative" setting purpose. The problem with using the Lens Profile Vignetting setting is that every lens exhibits a different amount of vignetting based on its design and aperture setting. If you could do this currently the results would be different based on the actual vignetting amount and its placement (linear, non-linear) exhibited by each lens. So I have to ask again–What specifically are you trying to accomplish?

Vignetting and rectilinear distortion correction to make your digital camera images "100% perfect" is generally unnecessary and can even degrade the image quality. I have the Lens Profile default Distortion set to 0 Amount for all of my lenses. For Vignetting I use a default setting between 50 and 100 dependent on the lens. Ultrawide angle lenses with lots of vignetting are set to 50, wide to telephoto lenses with moderate vignetting to 75, and other lenses with very low vignetting (macro) to 100. I only change these settings when an individual images exhibits noticeable distortion or vignetting. Here's why:
Distortion Correction Cons

1)Crops the image to maintain straight image borders–You lose the image peripheral area that is corrected. Wide and ultra-wide zoom lenses generally have significant barrel distortion. Applying 100% correction"effectively" increase the focal length, which means that expensive12-24mm zoom lens may provide something closer to a 14-26mm lens. It also reduces the image resolution in those “stretched” areas due to upscaling interpolation of the image data.

2) Wide angle lenses generally exhibit barrel type distortion, which actually helps to reduce corner and edge"stretching." By correcting this distortion to make it 100%"geometrically correct" the elongation will become more noticeable.In fact there is software available that can apply "non-rectilinear correction" (volume anamorphosis) to wide angle images to remove some of the elongation. This "added distortion" can actually improve certain images (i.e.people pictures).

Vignetting Correction Cons

1) Most people are accustomed to seeing some vignetting in photographs and in fact vignetting is sometimes "added"to images to focus attention on the central subject.

2) Wide and ultra-wide angle lenses usually exhibit significant vignetting especially at wide apertures, which can be as much as -3EV. You will need to apply +3EV of exposure compensation in the extreme corners to achieve 100% vignetting correction. This will significantly raise shadow noise and can also reduce image quality due to lens defects such as astigmatism, and coma.
(Edited)