Lightroom Desktop vs Lightroom Classic export resolution

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I use both Lightroom Classic and the newer Lightroom Desktop (cloud based) software, typically I have used the classic version due to the cloud based being more problematic and not having all the editing tools available, but it has been improving and it is nice to be able to review photos on the move sometimes.  However, yesterday I exported a series of photographs from the cloud based software to send to a print shop for printing, they contacted me today that the resolution on 1 was too low for the print size (30x80 print but picture is from a Sony a7RII and have printed similar from this camera before), so I started looking at all the exports.  I exported the same pictures tonight from Lightroom Classic and the files are almost 5-8 times larger.  These are the same files shared between the programs by sync.  They are both exported through the Lightroom export function as jpeg, full size, 100% quality.  But for example from Lightroom Desktop the file is 3.5MB for and Lightroom Classic it is 22.7MB.  The print shop caught one but 4 others went into printing already since they were 12x12 or 16x20 sizes and not as large of a discrepancy on file size.  Am I missing something with the cloud version of Lightroom that it will not export full resolution photos?  They show as being my original RAW files when editing them in Lightroom Desktop.  It doesn't indicate anywhere they are decreased resolution.  Do I just need to stay with Lightroom Classic for exporting?  This little glitch from Lightroom may end up costing me reprinting on 4 photos...
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Richard Inman

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Posted 6 months ago

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TangCanada

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Lightroom Desktop and Lightroom Classic is the same, as far as I am aware.... no?

The whole cloud based setup was sheer nonsense when I tested it about a year ago, fraught with confusion, inconsistencies, multiple copies of same files, dunno what is what, always syncing and resyncing, just sheer confusion.

IMO its just another way for Adobe to try get some more money from us buying storage.
I decided to have my own cloud... NAS drive, cost less than 200$ and I could access it from anywhere I have internet.
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Edmund Gall

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"Lightroom Desktop and Lightroom Classic is the same, as far as I am aware.... no?"

No. There are basically 3 different versions of Lightroom:
  1. Lightroom CC Desktop, or Lightroom Desktop for short, is the desktop version of the new, fully CreativeCloud-based Lightroom. It's nickname on this forum is Lightroom Cloudy.

  2. Lightroom CC is the mobile version of the fully CreativeCloud-based Lightroom that runs on your smartphone/tablet (some folks call it Lightroom Mobile here).

  3. Lightroom CC Classic, or Lightroom Classic for short, is the older/original Lightroom that runs on the desktop only (which is why it's confusing) but is based on the old code that is NOT fully CreativeCloud-based (but has some links to CreativeCloud).

For completeness, anything uploaded to Adobe CreativeCloud is also accesible via Lightroom for Web (the minimalistic browser-based portal). Hope that helps...
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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If you open the Info panel and look at the bottom, what size file does it say is available in the cloud? Original or smart preview? Or put another way, how are the photos getting into the cloudy app. Classic can only upload 2560px smart previews to the cloud, which would then limit the pixels available during cloudy export.
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Jim Wilde, Champion

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Although a "full size" export request will fail if there's only a smart preview in the cloud....

It would probably be helpful if the OP could tell us the comparable resolutions of the two test exports, one from Classic and the other from Cloudy. That would help us figure out what has happened here. Plus also knowing which of the Export options was used in Cloudy. Using the "Export Jpeg (Large)" preset should give the correctly-sized export, but the "Export Jpeg (Small)" obviously wouldn't. Using the main "Export" button, then setting all the options individually, the output file size would depend on what those individual settings are.
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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the resolution on 1 was too low for the print size 30x80 print but picture is from a Sony a7RII
In addition to what has already been stated a 30" x 80" print at 300 dpi requires an image file of 9000 x 24000 px. The Sony A7 RII full size image file is only 5304 x 7952 px. You will need to resize and apply output sharpening to the image file.

In LR Desktop to create a 30" x 80" print file use the below settings. Output Sharpening selection for printing is Matte or Glossy paper type. Color Space should be sRGB unless the printer specifically tells you they will accept wider gamut Adobe RGB or ProPhoto RGB files.


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Richard Inman

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Thanks everyone for your replies, I had a long 6 day stretch at work (photography is my hobby supported by my full time job), so just got back around to looking at these. 

Victoria, thanks for the information.  It was "smart preview" which as you pointed out is a decreased resolution file stored in the cloud, great for web browsing but not great for exporting for printing larger prints.  Kind of misleading in my opinion that Lightroom CC Desktop indicates it being a "full size" jpeg on export, but I guess it is full size, just "full size" of a "reduced size" stored in the cloud.  Lesson learned, will only rely on Lightroom Classic for exporting for prints.  I have only recently started using Lightroom Desktop because I have been playing with Portfolio some and I have found they integrate better, but it seems to have clouded  :-) the situation some (my experience is it is okay, it just isn't a Lightroom Classic replacement).

Todd, thanks for the reply, I had never gone through the calculations for this but it is very helpful to see how to do it and helps me know what to keep an eye on in the future.  Looking back the 30x80 I printed was a 5 picture panoramic stitch so was much larger than a single picture from my camera.  The picture I am using has very soft details, so am going to drop down to a 20x60 print (which might actually fit the space it is going in a bit better) and will be about 150dpi equivalent, which from what I have seen looking more into it is the minimum dpi that is considered "okay" for printing, but also okay for softer details.  I guess the question I have is if I apply the output sharpening on export for a 20x60 (so 3000x9000 or 9000 on long edge at 150dpi or 18000 on long edge at 300dpi) does it help avoid the "pixellation" effect on details?  I am not entirely clear on exactly what the output sharpening does.  I am okay with soft or slightly cloudy details (it is already a very soft sunset pic on the ocean) but would prefer not to have square pixelated details.  
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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I guess the question I have is if I apply the output sharpening on export for a 20x60 (so 3000x9000 or 9000 on long edge at 150dpi or 18000 on long edge at 300dpi) does it help avoid the "pixellation" effect on details?
1a) For best results you should export to the printer's native dpi. Epson inkjet printers are 360 dpi and Noritsu and other similar printers are 300 dpi. You'll need to ask the printer. Insert the appropriate 300 or 360 dpi value in the LR Export module Resolution field and the exact Long Edge value 60 in inches. The objective is to provide a file that doesn't need to be resized by the printer, which for a 20" x 60" print at 300 dpi is 6,000 x 18,000 px.

1b) Export Output Sharpening settings should be for the target paper type (Glossy or Matte) and Amount dependent on the subject type and sharpness of the original image file inside LR. You mention this image is soft so I would use Standard or High setting. The difference between Low, Standard, and High is subtle and Matte is slightly higher to compensate for the lower resolution paper type.

2) Having said all that if the original file resolution is less than the target output file size I suggest NOT resizing or applying output sharpening to the file. Instead send a full-size copy of the file to the printer with TIFF ProPhoto RGB file format the best choice. Again, you'll need to ask the printer as some require sRGB Profile JPEG files.

So if I assume you shot the panorama with the camera in landscape orientation then the panorama height should be 5304 px or slightly less for your Sony A7 RIII (5304 x 7952). 5304 px is less than the required 20" 300 dpi (6000 px.) or 360 dpi (7200 px.) resolution so go with #2 suggestion above. The printer's RIP engine will resize the image AND apply targeted sharpening for the paper type. They usually do a very good and you are correct that good results can be achieved using as low as 150 dpi resolution printer files. This is especially true for large print sizes that are viewed at a distance.
(Edited)
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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I am not entirely clear on exactly what the output sharpening does.
When an image is resized it loses edge definition. Images destined for screen viewing only should use the 'Screen' setting in the Output Sharpening panel. It applies a lower amount of sharpening than Glossy and Matte paper type setting. Full-size export images normally do not require output sharpening.

Jump to Stage 3:

https://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/image-sharpening.htm