Lightroom Classic: over-sensitive scrubby sliders

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  • Updated 10 months ago
As of upgrading to Lightroom Classic CC all scrubby sliders are too fiddly and over-sensitive. They react with far to big changes made with very small movements either using a mouse or a Wacom pen tablet. I'm running macOS 10.13.1, Lr Classic CC build 1142117 and Wacom driver to 6.3.23-4.

Previously the white balance tool (1) changed in 50 K increments if you grabbed the number and dragged, now you have to enter it by keyboard if you like round numbers. In the same manner exposure compensation (2) changed in 0,10 increments if you grabbed the number and dragged. If it were standing at +0,05 a quick step took it to +0,15.

The histogram points (3) interaction feels altered as well. Previously they had a very linear feel to the drag, and now very little happens when you drag and all of a sudden it pops and I've gone to far. All precision is lost and replaced with a sluggish feel.

As I wrote this is not merely a Wacom issue as has been the case before, but also affects mouse actions. Basically a lot happens to fast. Could some sort of acceleration algoritm have been added? If so please remove it because I want the old solid performance back.

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Henrik Mjöberg

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Posted 10 months ago

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mark goldberg

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I agree. Sliders too sensitive. I want old performance back>
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Henrik Mjöberg

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Please like the idea (close to the top of the page and to the right) so Adobe notice our request.
(Edited)
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Jerry Syder

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Hey Henrik, I agree too that the increments are not particularly optimal, nor is the responsiveness. Try holding shift while pushing the sliders, it decreases the incrimants. Holding ALT in the tone curve also locks the adjustments vertically and in smaller increments, too.
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Henrik Mjöberg

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Thanks Jerry, good tips! It seems like Shift is a good button to keep pressed all the time, haha. For me Shift also locks previously placed points on the tone curve vertically. However if I press Alt the curves adjustment gets really weird. Pressing Alt while dragging a point up and down vigorously several times makes it travel horizontally towards the darker end a fair bit each time.

Although I'm still not quite satisfied. The Shift alternator doesn't seem to do anything for white-balance and for the other sliders I could do with the added Shift control all the time, and pressing shift could further enhance control resolotion (slowing things down) when using a pen tablet. I just don't like the accelerated feel and sudden jumps when it's supposed to be linear using a tablet.

Clicking keyboard up or down arrow moves current slider up or down 5 values at a time which is still nice. Adding Shift multiplies that correction by 4. This keyboard functionality has been around since 2015.
(Edited)
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Reinard Schmitz

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It's also with Black and White, Shadows and Lights. They make the areas in question flickering. This was not in LE6.
(Edited)
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Henrik Mjöberg

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Please like the idea (close to the top of the page and to the right) so Adobe notice our request.
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Tom de Jongh

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So many problems keep being reported by users yet little response from Adobe.  I have reinstalled Lightroom CC (2015) which is quite usable.  I will try Classic CC again after the inevitable update.  Hopefully sometime soon.....
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Rick Spaulding, Champion

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Hi Henrik,

I'm running the same configuration you are except for the Wacom tablet. I find the sliders to be very smooth and responsive.

I like to collapse the left hand panel and expand the right hand panel to it's maximum to get really precise control when grabbing sliders.

Most of the time I like to rest my cursor over the slider I'm using and use the up or down arrow keys to move in small, precise increments. Holding the shift key increases the increments in which they move. For example, the exposure slider will move in 1/10th stop increments normally or in 1/3 stop increments with the shift key. 

Resting your cursor over the Histogram or Tone Curve works the same way!

It took me a while to get used to doing it this way but now it's intuitive and it really speeds up my workflow. It may be that all my work is done on a laptop so I've become a keyboard shortcut addict!

Maybe you already knew these tricks but perhaps someone will benefit from them.

Cheers!

Rick
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Henrik Mjöberg

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Thanks Rick, good tips! I like using keyboard and shortcuts a lot, especially when working with Photoshop. However this keyboard functionality using up-down-arrow-keys has been around since 2015, and I'm still irked that I can't modify shortcut keystrokes like in Ps as I have a Swedish keyboard that for example lacks bracket keys, which in turn makes it impossible to rotate an image with the keyboard as I have to press Alt-( to get a [ and those strokes messes up the shortcut.

I can feel the added control by expanding the adjustments panel to the right using a Wacom tablet or mouse, and there's nothing wrong with hiding the left panel in the development module. A second thought is; that it's just too bad the tone curve adjustment box doesn't grow along with it compared to Ps. Though everything was working fine before and I had greater control then. I just don't like the accelerated feel and sudden jumps when it's supposed to be linear using a tablet.
(Edited)